Where my Ancestors were 100 years ago.

Mappy Monday
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.Randy Seaver in his blog, Genea-Musings suggested that we look at where our ancestors were 100 years ago. I thought I’d take a stab at it more from a location perspective. In October 1917, my ancestors were in Illinois, Indiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, and Minnesota. Just “I” and “M” states. My paternal side are the “I” states; the Roberts were in Illinois and the Scotts were in Indiana. My maternal side are the “M” states; the Browns were in Minnesota and the Montrans (Barbers) were in Michigan, except for my grandmother, Madonna (Donna) who lived in Massachusetts for a short time.

Map of my Ancestor locations in 1917.
My Ancestor Locations in 1917.

Paternal Side:

My paternal grandfather, Bert Allen Roberts, was 14 years old. His father had died in 1908 and he was living with his mother, step-father, brother and two sisters. It isn’t clear if they were living in Turman, Sullivan County, Indiana (1910) or in Hutsonville, Crawford County, Illinois (1920), but I think they were still in Indiana.

Bert’s 71-year-old grandmother, Patience Ann (Marshall) (Dean) Roberts was living in Sesser, Barren Township, Franklin County, Illinois.

Bert’s 34-year-old mother, Clora Dell (Scott) (Roberts) Adams was married to Hosea Adams. It is unclear if they were still in Turman, Sullivan, Indiana, or if they had relocated to Hutsonville, Crawford County, Illinois in 1917.

Clora’s father, Samuel Vaden Scott, had remarried Lavina Allmend after the death of Amanda Jane Haley. The 57-year old was living in Goode Township, Franklin County, Illinois.

My paternal grandmother, Essie Pansy Barnes, was 14 years old. She was living on the farm near Turman, Sullivan County, Indiana.

Essie’s father, Joel Clinton Barnes, was 60 years old and living on a farm near Graysville, Turman Township, Sullivan County, Indiana.

Essie’s mother, Marada A. (Lister) Barnes, was 50 years old and living with Joen on the farm near Graysville, Turman Township, Sullivan County, Indiana.

 

Maternal side

My maternal grandfather, Clifford D Brown, later known as Richard Earl Durand and even later as Richard Earl Brown, (Grandpa Dick) was also 14 years-old. He lived with his family in Backus, Cass County, Minnesota.

Clifford/Richard’s father, Arthur Durwood Brown, was 48-years-old and living in Backus, Cass County, Minnesota.

Clifford/Richard’s mother, Mary Elizabeth (Manning) Brown, was 39-years-old and living with her husband, Arthur, in Backus.

My maternal grandmother, Madonna Mae Montran, (later known as Donna) was married to Thomas Valentine Rooney (her second marriage). (It does not appear that she ever took his surname.) They were probably living in Wrentham, Norfolk County, Massachusetts, although they may have located to New York City about that time.  Madonna’s father died before 1900 and I have been unsuccessful in determining his parents.

Madonna’s (Donna’s) mother, Ida Mae (Barber) (Montran) (Fisher) (Holdsworth) Knight was living with her 4th husband, Harvey Knight in Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan.

Ida’s mother, Sarah H (Blackhurst) Barber was also living in Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan. Her husband, Frank Barber, died earlier in 1917.

Thoughts

Thirteen of my direct ancestors were alive in September 1917. That is all four of my grandparents, six of my great-grandparents, and three of my 14 known great-great-grandparents.

Based upon their locations in 1917, I can say my father’s line came from Illinois and Indiana and my mother’s line came from Michigan and Minnesota.  I have a birthplace chart that shows where my ancestors were born that tells a somewhat different story. Grandpa Dick was born in North Dakota but was in Minnesota in 1917. Similarly, my great-grandmother, Mary (Manning) Brown, was born in Kentucky but was in Minnesota in 1917.

My life locations provide some of greatest location distances of anyone I know. I was born in Portland, Oregon; I hail from Minnesota, having lived there during most of my youth and over 35 years total. Over the years, I have lived in Oregon, Minnesota, Michigan, Colorado, Montana, California, Virginia, Hawaii, Massachusetts, West Virginia, Georgia, and Maine. Now, I live about 3,200 miles away from my birth location of Portland, Oregon, in Portland, Maine.


Handy Genealogy Handbooks – “All You Need to Find Genealogy Resources FAST!”

Ancestor Biography – Stephen Blackhurst (1801-1869)

 [Brown]/Montran/Barber/Blackhurst Line
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.As I have begun to get to know my Blackhurst heritage, I am amazed. It is an incredible group of people descended from 19th century English immigrants, Stephen and Fannie (Taylor) Blackhurst. Fifty years after Stephen’s death family reunions began. Their descendants include many community leaders including a superintendent of schools for St. Charles, Missouri. It is more amazing because until I began investigating this family line I had not hear of any Blackhurst ancestors.  It was a name neither my mother nor her brother recalled ever hearing. They both remembered hearing about their great-grandmother Sarah Barber, who died when my uncle was only one year old, but neither recalled hearing Sarah’s maiden name.

Of course, I wonder what caused my line to appear to have become estranged from the remainder of Blackhursts.  I have my suspicions, but need to do a lot more research to prove them. In any event, in introduce you to my third great-grandfather, Stephen Blackhurst.

Roberts-Brown-2017 – Ancestor #62

List of Grandparents

  1. Grand Parent: Madonna Montran
  2. 1st Great: Ida Barber
  3. 2nd Great: Sarah H Blackhurst
  4. 3rd Great: Stephen Blackhurst
  5. 4th Great: Stephen Blackhurst

Stephen Blackhurst (1801-1869)

Birth

Birth years are often contentious and Stephen’s birth year is no exception. He was certainly born sometime between 1799 and 1804.

  • 1799 – His death in 1869 at the age of 70 suggests that he was born in 1799.
  • 1800 – The 1860 Census indicates his age as 60, suggesting a birth year of 1800.
  • 1801 – His marker displays 1801. Because there is no definitive source for his birth year, 1801 is the year I prefer to use.
  • 1802 – The 1841 England Census indicates his age of 39, suggesting a birth year of 1802.
  • 1804 – The 1850 US Census indicates his age as 46, suggesting a birth year of 1804.

Other records indicate he was born in Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England.

Childhood

I believe Stephen was the child of Stephen Blackhurst and Lydia Ellen Cochran. I know nothing of Stephen’s childhood nor of his siblings.

Marriage

Relationship of Sheffield and Rotherham in South Yorkshire

Stephen and Fanny Taylor married on 26 Dec 1825 in Rotherham, South Yorkshire, England. Rotherham is the district immediately east of Sheffield.

Adulthood

It appears that the couple may have moved between Sheffield and Kingston upon Hull. Records indicate that their first child, Ellen, was born in Kingston upon Hull and five of the other children were born in Sheffield. There are two children that I don’t have any details on their birth locations and, of course, Ellen’s birth location is single sourced and may be incorrect.

In any event, by 1841 the Blackhursts had located to Kingston upon Hull (known as Hull today), Yorkshire, England.

Coming to America

The 1855 New York Census indicates that Stephen had come to America seven years earlier (1848) while his wife and three of his children had come to America five years earlier (1850). The family, Stephen and Fannie, with six of the children (Elizabeth, Mary, William, Eleazer, Ann, and Sarah) were settled in Auburn, Cayuga County, New York during the 1850 Census. Their oldest daughter, Ellen, married on 4 July 1850 and the census enumeration occurred on the 8th of August. The 1855 New York Census still shows the family in Auburn.

Move to Michigan

It appears that the Blackhursts came to Michigan in 1859. The 1860 Census shows Stephen and  Fanny along with the three youngest children, William, Louise, and Sarah living in Sheridan Township, Calhoun County, Michigan. The Blackhurst farm appears to be about four miles north of Albion. So, over the ensuing years various documents indicate they live in Albion and Sheridan (Township).  There were some apparent conflicts in the 1860 Census that I addressed here.

Death

Marker = Stephen Blackhurst
1801-1869

Stephen Blackhurst died on 24 December 1869 of “Dropsy of the Bowels” (Ascites) in Albion, Calhoun County, Michigan. He is buried at Riverside Cemetery in Albion.

Story

54 years after Stephen Blackhurst’s death, his descendants got together for a family reunion at a park in nearby Jackson, Michigan. See: Blackhurst Family Reunion – 1923 for details.

Children:

Stephen Blackhurst and Fanny Taylor had the following children:

  1. Ellen Blackhurst was born on 19 Oct 1829 in Kingston upon Hull, Yorkshire, England. She died on 17 Feb 1905 in Sheridan Township, Calhoun County, Michigan. She married Henry Clough on 04 Jul 1850 in Auburn, Cayuga, New York.
  2. Elizabeth Blackhurst was born on 21 Oct 1831 in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England. She died on 14 Feb 1915 in Calhoun, Michigan.
  3. Mary Blackhurst was born on 20 Dec 1833 in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England. She died on 14 Feb 1900 in Springport, Jackson, Michigan. She married Royal Baldwin on 11 Jan 1857 in Calhoun County, Michigan.
  4. William Stephen Blackhurst was born on 13 May 1835 in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England. He died on 10 Mar 1914 in Avalon, Livingston, Missouri. He married Emily M Vase on 05 Sep 186417 in Calhoun County, Michigan,Usa. He married Sarah Elizabeth Hinkley sometime between 1875-1886.
  5. Louise Blackhurst (aka “Eleazer” and possibly “Louisa”) was born on 14 Aug 1840 in England. She died on 17 Mar 1927 in Albion, Calhoun, Michigan at the age of 88 Years, 7 Months, 3 Days.
    1. She married Samuel Sanders about 1862.
    2. She married Champion Eslow on 03 Sep 1872 in Albion, Calhoun, Michigan.
    3. She married Francis Magennis on 15 Aug 1882 in Albion, Calhoun, Michigan.
    4. She married Charles Henry Peck19 on 21 Dec 1898 in Albion, Calhoun, Michigan. It was the 4th marriage for Louise and the 2nd marriage for Charles.
  6. Phoebe Anna Blackhurst was born on 15 May 1842 in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England. She died on 17 Aug 1929 in Chicago, Cook, Illinois.
  7. Sarah H Blackhurst was born on 29 Dec 1847 in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England. She died on 08 Aug 1928 at home at 1456 Lawndale, Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan. Stephen White, Justice of the Peace, performed the marriage ceremony for Sarah and Franklin E Barber on 08 Nov 1869 in Sheridan Township, Calhoun County, Michigan.

Sources

Further Actions / Follow-up

  • Trace Stephen Blackhurst’s life in England before his coming to the United States.

Mitochondrial DNA Ancestors – Sarah H Blackhurst Barber (1847-1929)

Mitochondrial DNA ancestors

By – Don Taylor 

Sarah Blackhurst Barber is a particularly special ancestor for me. First, she is my most recent immigrant ancestor.  Second, she is a mitochondrial ancestor. That is to say, I carry her mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Mitochondrial DNA is passed from mother to child.  As such, I received my mtDNA from my mother, who received it from her mother (Madonna Montran), who received it from her mother (Ida Barber), who received it from her mother (Sarah Blackhurst).  I have not done a mtDNA Test yet, but I should do one so that I have some experience with the test and its results.

There are very few of us with Sarah’s mtDNA. Sarah had two children, Ida and Eva. Eva died with no children. Ida had one daughter, Madonna.  Madonna only had one daughter and a son.  Her son is still living and carried her mtDNA but his children, of course, do not. Madonna’s daughter (my mother) had two boys. He and I carry it.  She also had two girls; one of them only had boys, they have the same mtDNA, but won’t pass it on to future generations.  The other daughter of my mother had two boys and a girl. Again, the two boys have the mtDNA but won’t pass it on. That leaves her daughter, the only descendant of Sarah’s with the potential of passing Sarah’s mitochondrial DNA on to a future generation (she doesn’t have any children yet).

My mtDNA Sources
• My mother (living)
• Madonna Montran
• Ida Barber
• Sarah Blackhurst
• Fanny Taylor

That said, Sarah did have five sisters.  I haven’t had a chance to trace any of their descendants. Hopefully, there are other descendants that her mtDNA has been passed along to.

Bio – Sarah H Blackhurst Barber (1847-1929)

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 08

Sarah H Blackhurst was born in December 1847 in England, probably Sheffield, Yorkshire, England. She was the seventh child of Stephen and Fanny (Taylor) Blackhurst.

Her older siblings include:
• Ellen (1829-1905)
• Elizabeth (~1831-1910)
• Mary (1833-1900)
• William Stephen (~1835-1917)
• Louisa (1838-1927) [1]
• Phoebe Anna (~1842-1929)

Auburn – State St. from Genesee St. c. 1910
Via Wikipedia [Public Domain]

Shortly after her birth, in 1848, her father left for the United States and settled in Auburn, Cayuga County, New York establishing himself as a shoe maker.  It was two years later that the family arrived. Ellen was not with them, but the rest of the family was enumerated in Auburn during the 1850 Census. [2][3]

The family was together during the New York 1855 Census. I have been unable to find the family in the 1860 Census.

On 8 October 1869, Sarah married Franklin E Barber in Sheridan Township, Calhoun County, Michigan. One very interesting aspect of their marriage is that he marriage occurred before the license was taken out.  The date of their license was 22 Jan 1870 and the the date of their marriage was 8 Nov 1969, seventy-five days earlier. None of the other entries on that page in the marriage registration logbook have similar confusing entries. Sarah’s sister “Louisee” (Louisa Sanders) was one of the witnesses. The other witness was James Hickey also of Sheridan Township. (His relationship is unknown.) Officiating the rite was Stephen White, a Justice of the Peace.[4]

In 1874, their first child, Ida, was born.

In December, 1877, their second child, another girl was born. They named her Eva.

In 1880, the young family is living in Albion, Calhoun County, Michigan. Frank was a painter, who had been unemployed four of the previous twelve months. Sarah was keeping house for her two children, Ida, age 6 and Eva, age 2.[5]

In 1900, Sarah and 22-year-old daughter, Eva are living at 250 Fifth, Detroit, Michigan. Husband Frank is living at the Soldier’s Home in Grand Rapids.[6]

Woodward Avenue, Detroit, MI c.1910
By Detroit Publishing Co. [Public domain],
via Wikimedia Commons

In 1910, the 62-year-old Sarah was living with her older daughter Ida in Detroit. Ida had divorced her third husband, Joseph Holdsworth. Sarah is listed in the 1910 Census as widowed;[7] however, her husband is till living at the Soldier’s home in Grand Rapids.  He is also identified as widowed.

1917 was a very bad year.  Her husband’s dying on April 7th may have been anti-climatic, but her youngest daughter, Eva, Sarah’s died on November 8th at the age of 33.

In 1920, Sarah was living in New York City at 134 Lawrence Street, Manhattan. This is now 126th Street and appears to be a parking ramp today.  The Census indicates that her granddaughter Madonna Montran was living with her. However, in January of 1920, when the Census was taken, Donna was on the road with the “Chin Chin” production.  Living with the 70-year-old Sarah is a boarder named Charles Smith. Charles was a 26-year-old German music composer.[8]

Limited Time Only: Save up to 30% on easy, affordable computer backup. Buy Now! Today, 125th Street is perceived to be the heart of Harlem. But in 1920, the black neighborhood started a few blocks north, at 130th Street.[9] There was an IRT station three blocks away at 125th and one at 130th. The IRT (Interborough Rapid Transit) was originally an elevated cable car system but converted to electric in 1903.  The line was closed in 1940.[10]

I believe that Sarah died on 6 September 1929, in Brooklyn, Kings County, New York.[11]  I have ordered a copy of a death certificate for a person who I believe is our Sarah Barber.  When I receive it, it should confirm the death date and provide clues to burial information.

Further Actions: 

Await receipt of Death Certificate to confirm death date and a clue to her burial location.
Find Blackhurst Family in the 1860 Census. Location unknown (New York to Michigan).
Find the Barber Family in the 1870 Census. They should be in Calhoun County, MI.
Take a mtDNA Test to document Sarah’s mtDNA.

List of Greats
1. Ida May Barber [Montran] [Fisher] [Holdsworth] [Knight]
2. Sarah H Blackhurst [Barber]
3.     Fanny Taylor [Blackhurst]

ENDNOTES

[1] “Eleazer” in the 1850 Census is believe to be an alternative name for Louisa.

[2] 1920 Census; Sarah Barber Head – Manhattan Assembly District 13, New York, New York; Roll: T625_1209; Page: 24A; Enumeration District: 958; “Arrival 1850”.

[3] New York, State Census, 1855; Stephen Blackhurst – New York, Cayuga, Sheet 37, Line 21, Note: All family members except for Stephen had been in City or town for 5 years.

[4] Michigan, Calhoun, Certified Copy of a Marriage Record; Barber-Blackhurst – 1869; Repository: Don Taylor personal files.

[5] 1880 Census; Frank Barber Head – Albion, Calhoun, Michigan, ED 062, Page No 13.

[6] 1900 Census; Sarah Barber Head – Detroit, Michigan, ED 36, Sheet 13B

[7] 1910 Census; Ida Holdsworth Head – Detroit, Wayne, Michigan

[8] 1920 Census; Sarah Barber Head – Manhattan Assembly District 13, New York, New York; Roll: T625_1209; Page: 24A; Enumeration District: 958.
[9] Internet: Digital Harlem Blog –“Harlem in the 1920s

[10] Internet: Wikipedia – “125th Street (IRT Ninth Avenue Line)”

[11] New York, New York, Death Index, 1862-1948; Sarah Barber

———- DISCLAIMER ———-

  

Searching for the death records for Frank Barber

Franklin E Barber (1836-1917)

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 4
By Don Taylor

Intro

Sometimes learning a key bit of information about an ancestor can be complicated.  In the 1910 Census, Franklin’s wife, Sarah, indicates that she is a widow. Also, their 1869 marriage record indicates that Frank was born between 1940 and 1842, depending upon how you read the record.  Those “facts” had me searching and searching to no avail. Sometimes you need to go back to the beginning and grind through the documents and do a lot more analysis.  It isn’t always about finding the obvious “low hanging fruit,” but rather, doing your due diligence and analysis of what you do find.

Birth

The 1869 marriage record when Franklin Barber married Sarah H Blackhurst indicated that Frank was 28 years old and was born in Sheridan, Michigan.[i] Because the marriage occurred before the license was gotten, it is unclear of the age of 28 was at the time of marriage or at the time of the license. Considering both possibilities, he would have been born between Nov 1840 and Jan 1842 by this record.
The 1880 Census, shows Frank E Barber as 40 years old, indicating a birth between 2 June 1839 and 1 June 1840. It also says he was born in Ohio.[ii]
It is interesting to note that the 1917 death certificate for Frank’s daughter, Eva Louisa (Barber) Goff, indicates that her father, Frank was born in Pennsylvania.
It is also interesting to note that the 1930 Census record for Ida Mae (Barber) Knight indicates that her father, Frank was born in Spain.[iii]
Franklin (Frank) E Barber was born between 2 Jun 1839 and Jan 1842 in Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Spain or possibly even France.

Military Service

Photo courtesy of Trip Advisor
According to the 1890 Census [iv] Frank Barber enlisted in Union Army in April of 1864 and was discharged in 1865. It appears he served in Company I, Sixth Michigan Heavy Artillery. He lived in Albion Village in Calhoun County when he enlisted and was discharged at Jackson, Michigan.
The Sixth Michigan Heavy Artillery mostly saw garrison duty in Louisiana, Alabama, Arkansas, and Mississippi.  However, the unit, while Frank was a part of it, was involved in the “Mobile Campaign,” including the siege and taking of Spanish Fort.[v]

Marriage

Franklin Barber and Sarah H Blackhurst were married on 8 Nov 1869 by Justice of the Peace, Stephen White, in Sheridan Township, Calhoun County, Michigan. Franklin, Sarah, both witnesses, James Hickey and Louisee Sanders, and the Justice were all from Sheridan. The village of Albion is within Sheridan Township. The record also shows that the couple didn’t get their marriage license until a couple months later, on 22 Jan 1870.
1870 – Unable to find Frank/Franklin Barber/Barbour in the 1870 Census.
1874 – The birth of their first child, a daughter Ida Mae Barber, my Great Grandmother, occurred on 24 March 1874.
1877 – The birth of their second child, another daughter, Eva Louisa Barber, occurred on 5 Dec 1877.
1880 – Frank is married to Sarah and living in Albion Village, with his wife and two girls. His occupation was a painter, but he had been unemployed for four months during the previous census year.  This Census indicates his father was born in New York and his mother was born in Vermont.[vi]
1890 – It is rare to find a person in the 1890 Census. Luckily there was a Schedule “Union Veterans and Widows of the Civil War” that indicated that Frank was living in Albion.[vii] That census record also confirms the information regarding his Civil War service.
1900 – This is where the records really go awry.
Sarah, Frank’s wife, is living, as the head of the household, in in Detroit with her 22-year-old daughter, Eva. The record is legible and it indicates that Sarah is 42 years old but was born in December of 1867. If she was really born in December of 1867, she would be only 32 years old. So it is clearly an error in the census record. It also indicates that she has been married for 27 years, which indicates she was married about 1872-1873. [viii]
By 1900, Ida is on her second marriage and living in Manistee with her husband Max Fisher. The census indicates Ida was 25 years old and had been married to Max for seven years. Max was only 23. Madonna was going by the surname of Fisher and was seven years old. The freaky part of this census is that the census indicates that Ida’s father (Frank) was born in France.[ix]
Main Building, Soldier’s Home, Grand Rapids, MI
Photo by Tichnor Brothers, Publisher
[Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

But where is Frank in 1900?

I can’t find Frank in Calhoun County in the 1900 Census. With Ida heading up her own household, I figured that Frank abandoned her.  Then I found a Frank Barber in the Soldier’s Home in Grand Rapids, Michigan (about 100 miles away).[x] I had seen this record before and have vacillated between believing that the Frank Barber at the Soldier’s Home is Frank Barber of Albion and not believing it to be the case.

Comparison of Frank Barber of Albion & Frank Barber of Soldier’s Home

Our Frank
Soldier’s Home Frank
Birth
1840-1842
Oct 1836
Married
1869
1861 – 39 years
Born
Ohio
Ohio
Father Born
New York
New York
Mother Born
Vermont
New York
Occupation
Painter
Painter
There are definitely enough points of convergence to make me think it might be the same Frank Barber and enough differences to make me think they are different Frank Barbers. So, I got to thinking. In the 1910 Census, Sarah indicates she is a widow. Could I find Frank in the 1910 Census?
1910 – Ida (now Holdsworth) is now the head of the household in Detroit with her daughter, Madonna, and her mother, Sarah, living with her. Sarah is identified as a widow, which implies that her husband, Frank, has passed. Ida reports her father (Frank) was born in Ohio.[xi]
The 74-year-old Frank Barber was enumerated in the 1910 Census. He was identified as being born in the United States, serving in the Civil War for the Union, and was widowed.[xii] [Great – hear the sarcastic tone in that “Great.”] It is certainly possible that both Frank and Sarah wanted to consider the other one dead and reported themselves as widowed. But it is not a position I felt confident with.
Returning to the National Park Service’s Search for Soldiers, (By the way, a really great and useful site – http://www.nps.gov.) I looked for Frank Barbers who fought for the Union in the Civil War. The database reported 16 individuals.

National Park Service – Results of search for Union Soldiers named Frank Barber

Name
Battle Unit Name
Comments
Franklin E Barber
10th Reg., Ohio Cavalry
Our Frank had located to Michigan before the war – Unlikely but possible.
Frank Barber
9th Reg., Mass. Infantry
Massachusetts
Frank Barber
81st Reg., US Colored Inf.
Colored
Frank W. Barber
91st Reg., Illinois Inf.
Middle initial is wrong and our Frank has no history of Illinois.
Frank Barber
2nd Reg., Minnesota Cav.
Minnesota
Franklin F Barber
2nd Reg., Illinois Cav.
Middle initial is wrong and our Frank has no history of Illinois.
Frank Barber
6th Reg, Mich Heavy Artillery
Enlisted in Albion. Definitely our Frank.
Franklin A Barber
1st Reg., Mich Light Artillery
Middle initial wrong – But Possible.
Franklin H Barber
1st Reg., Mich Light Artillery
Middle initial wrong – But Possible.
Frank W Barber
49th Reg., New York Inf.
New York
Franklin Barber
7th Reg., Wisconsin Inf.
Wisconsin
Frank Barber
Ind. Battery… Colored Inf.
Colored
Frank Barber
62nd Reg., US Colored
Colored
Frank Barber
79th Reg. US Colored
Colored
Frank J Barber
4th Reg., Wisconsin Cav.
Wisconsin
Frank Barber
193rd Reg. New York Inf.
New York
So, which of these sixteen potential Frank Barbers is the one in the Soldier’s Home in Grand Rapids, Michigan in 1900 and 1910? Further looking at the Soldier Details on the NPS database revealed that Franklin A Barber was originally filed under Franklin H Barber, so it appears they are one individual.
The record that swayed me to back into believing that Frank Barber of Albion and Frank Barber of Soldier’s Home are the same person was in the Civil War Draft Registrations Records. This record shows that the Frank Barber of Albion was born in Ohio and was 26 years old on 1 July 1863. That puts his birthdate between 2 Jul 1836 and 1 Jul 1836.[xiii] Now, the 1900 Census entry indicating Frank of the Soldier’s home is consistent with Frank of Albion.
Our Frank
Soldier’s Home Frank
Birth
2 Jul 1836-1 Jul 1837
Oct 1836
Married
1869
1861 – 39 years
Born
Ohio
Ohio
Father Born
New York
New York
Mother Born
Vermont
New York
Occupation
Painter
Painter
As I said before, I have been vacillating between Frank of Albion and Frank of the Soldier’s Home being the same person. I can live with the discrepancy of his mother’s birth location, particularly because it is the same as his father’s birth location.  The discrepancy in marriage information concerns me somewhat; eight years seems like a lot.
Frank Barber, Co. I, 6 Mich Heavy Artillery
Photo via Find-a-Grave.
However, one last find totally convinced me that Frank Barber of Albion and Frank of Soldier’s Home is the same person. MIGenWeb (Michigan Genealogy on the Web) has a section regarding Michigan in the Civil War. A search for Frank Barber found the Frank Barber buried at Soldier’s Home in Grand Rapids was part of the 6th Infantry, Company I.[xiv] (The 6th Infantry was renamed the 6th Heavy Artillery.)
Knowing Frank was buried at Soldier’s Home made it easy to find a Find-a-Grave record for him. According to Find-a-Grave, Frank Barber died on 7 April 1917 and is buried at Grand Rapids Veterans Home Cemetery, (Soldier’s Home Cemetery) Grand Rapids, Kent County, Michigan at lot 7, Row 10, Grave 13.[xv]
Certainly, the idea that Frank went into the Soldier’s home in his early sixties and his wife and children moved on without him is disturbing.  That both he and his wife thought of themselves as widowed in 1910 is also saddening. We may never know how or why Frank went into the home but it is worth pursuing.

Further research needed:

Find Franklin Barber in the 1870, 1860, 1850, and 1840 Censuses.
Determine Franklin Barber’s parents’ names.
Learn more about Frank Barber’s Civil War Experience.
Determine why Frank went into the Soldier’s home at such an early age.

Endnotes

[Note: The bold numbers refer to my source database.]
[i] 481. “Michigan, Calhoun, Certified Copy of a Marriage Record,” Don Taylor, Maine, Don Taylor
[ii] 609. “1880 Census,” Sheridan, Calhoun, Michigan, USA, 13, Frank E Barber (Line 48), 1 Jun 1880, Digital Image, Image from Ancestry.Com, 3/7/14.
[iii] 269. “1930 Census,” Ancestry, http://www.Ancestry.com.
[iv] 612. “1890 Census of Union Veterans and Widows of the Civil War,” Albion, Calhoun, Michigan, 10 of 146, Frank Barber (Line 16), 1 June 1890, Digital Image, Family Search, 15 Jan 2016.
[v] 613. National Park Service, “Union Michigan Volunteers,” 6th Regiment, Michigan Heavy Artillery, http://www.nps.gov/civilwar/search-battle-units-detail.htm?battleUnitCode=UMI0006RAH, 15 Jan 2016.
[vi] 609. “1880 Census,” Sheridan, Calhoun, Michigan, USA, 13, Frank E Barber (Line 48), 1 Jun 1880, Digital Image, Image from Ancestry.Com, 3/7/14.
[vii] 612. “1890 Census of Union Veterans and Widows of the Civil War,” Albion, Calhoun, Michigan, 10 of 146, Frank Barber (Line 16), 1 June 1890, Digital Image, Family Search, 15 Jan 2016.
[viii] 610. “1900 Census,” Detroit Ward 4, Wayne, Michigan, Roll 748, Page 13B, ED 0036, Sarah Barber, 1 Jun 1900, Digital Image, Ancestry.com, 15 Jan 2015.
[ix] 614. “1900 Census,” Manistee Ward 6, Manistee, Michigan, Sheet 4A, Max Fisher, 1 Jun 1900, Digital Image, Ancestry, 14 Sep 2010.
[x] 611. “1900 Census,” Grand Rapids, Kent, Michigan, Frank Barber,  Roll: 723; Page: 4A; Enumeration District: 0148; FHL microfilm: 1240723, 1 Jun 1900, Digital Image, Ancestry, 15 Jan 2016.
[xi] 615. “1910 Census,” Detroit Ward 7, Wayne, Michigan, Roll: T624_683; Page: 8A, Ida Holdsworth, 15 Apr 1910, Digital Image, Ancestry, 13 Sep 1910.
[xii] 616. “1910 Census,” Grand Rapids, Kent, Michigan, Roll: T624_655; Page: 10A, Frank Barber, 15 Apr 1910, Digital Image, Ancestry, 16 Jan 2016.
[xiii] 617. “U.S., Civil War Draft Registrations Records, 1863-1865,” Franklin Barber, NAI: 4213514; Archive Volume Number: 1 of 3.
[xiv] 618. “Michigan Veterans of the Civil War, Buried at Soldiers Home, Grand Rapids, MI,” Frank Barber, http://www.migenweb.org/michiganinthewar/gravesites/soldiershome.htm, MIGenWeb (Michigan Genealogy of the Web), Don Harvey.
[xv] 619. “Find a Grave,” Frank Barber – Memorial #14714632, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=14714632.
———- DISCLAIMER ———-

My DNA Projects – 1 October 2014

Where I am at with my various DNA Projects, October 1st, 2014.

Ancestry.Com

I was mightily disappointed when Ancestry quit support for their Y-DNA testing. I was surprised to see that my results and other information was still on Ancestry, but, of course, there were no new matches. 
My Y-DNA Lineage from Ancestry.Com
My plan to follow my closest DNA match from Ancestry up five generations and back down five generations didn’t yield any potential candidates for the “baby daddy.”  So, without any further Y-DNA matches possible through Ancestry it appears that further looking into that line is not going to be fruitful.

My Wife’s Y-DNA – Ancestry

My wife’s brother’s Ancestry Y-DNA test results are in the same state. No new matches because Ancestry has stopped supporting Y-DNA.  Another promising tool that has ended in a dead end.  
I definitely feel that I wasted some money with Ancestry on their Y-DNA tests.  As such, I will probably never recommend Ancestry DNA Testing of any kind because of my bad experience with due to their decision to stop support of  Y-DNA testing.  

Family Tree DNA

My haplogroup’s (R1b) migration from Family Tree DNA
My closest hit to my DNA (89% likelihood a common ancestor in 8 generations) still hasn’t answered. So, I emailed him again.  I did do a search for him on line and found a person with his name died a couple years ago.  Not looking good for the home team.  The email address for him in Family Tree DNA is pointing to another person, so it is still possible that I will be able to connect with a relative of his and possibly share information.  We will see. 
Again, no new connections on Family Tree DNA.
I did not do an  upgrade kit for my brother-in-law so there is nothing about any connections to him in Family Tree DNA.

My Friend T-Roy
I’ve been helping a friend, T-Roy, with his genealogy.  In particular his paternal side is lost.  We know precious little regarding his grandfather and nothing before that. A search for his great grandparents has yielded several potential candidates, however, none are clear.  I suggested that a Y-DNA test might help us find someone who is related and then be able to connect the dots from the potential candidates.  We’ll see.

My Autosomal Results

Ancestry.Com

There was a new “3rd” cousin identified on Ancestry.  Because Ancestry doesn’t tell you anything about the match I have no idea if the match is on my mother’s line or my unknown paternal line. The individual, who is now my closest atDNA match didn’t relate their DNA to a tree so I have no idea about potential surnames.  I emailed the individual and hopefully she will share her tree and other information. There were several other new matches, however, they were all 4th cousin and greater.  I looked at any family trees that they have and didn’t see anything of interest.

23 & Me

23 and Me has been my most
successful DNA testing company that I have used so far. There are several
reasons for that. First, and foremost, I had both my mother and my DNA Tests
submitted to 23 & Me. That is a big help in determining where matches come
from. My initial plan was to use the tests to be able to discriminate matches
from my unknown father’s side from my known mother’s side of the family.

My mother’s matches:

Looking at my mother’s matches,
the closest match (excluding me) is Ronald M. with 2.3% Shared and 11 segments
in common. I was able to contact the individual and after comparing trees,
found that my mother and Ronald are second cousins, once removed. They share common
ancestors with my mom’s great grandparents (Henry & Marian (Sanford)
Brown).
The next closest match to my
mother is Rick C. He and my mom share 1.61% and 10 segments. He responded to
some queries and we quickly determined his is a 1st cousin, twice
removed, from my mother. Their common ancestors are my mom’s grandparents
(Arthur D & Mary (Manning) Brown).
The 3rd closest match
is to M. C. this match was really great as it expanded our understand of a line
and broke through a “brick wall.” A review of M. C.’s tree yielded a surname
match on Blackhurst. Further investigation showed that M. C.’s ancestor, William
Stephen Blackhurst, had a sibling named Sarah who was born about the same date
as my mother’s grandmother. Another of the siblings and the father of William
and Sarah died in the same city, Albion, MI, that our Sarah lived. Further
correlation showed me that their William was, indeed, the sibling of our Sarah
and that through this connection we were able to extend the line back another
generation to our common ancestors, Stephen and Fanny (Taylor) Blackhurst. 
My Ancestry Composition per 23 and Me

My matches:

On my paternal side, matches to me and not my
mother, are much less interesting. The closest match is a male with whom I
share only four segments (.91%). I sent him an introduction but he hasn’t
responded. I’ve sent a few other individuals introductions and received no
responses from most of them. The few that have responded I have looked at their
trees, but haven’t found anything of particular interest. When less than 1%
matches, investing much time isn’t very helpful.

My Aunt:

I recently sent a DNA kit to my half aunt (my
mother’s half sister). In a phone call last week, she indicated that she
received the kit and registered it. She said she’d have it in the mail later in
the week. They take several weeks to process so that should be interesting. With
some luck, she will have received some different segment from my mother and we
can those differences to potentially find other relatives.

GEDMatch.Com

As I write this GEDMatch.com website is
down.  This free site has a lot of
potential and is the only place that I know if that allows you to submit your
DNA results from multiple sites.  It is
an unaffiliated, volunteer, website and is in need of donations to maintain its
operation.  If you use it, please donate
to them so they can keep the site in operation.
  
They give instructions on how to export your
autosomal DNA test results from Ancestry.ComFamily Tree DNA, and 23&Me and
you import the results into their system. Although their takes a while to process
your data and populate into their system, don’t complain about the speed.  Again, did I say donate? 

The X Chromosome

I’ve recently been hearing a lot about X
chromosome matching.  This has really
gotten me excited and rejuvenated regarding using DNA as a method to find
ancestors.
I’m looking forward to using the GEDMatch
system to look at the X chromosome matches for my mom and my aunt (when her
results are received).  Because one of
the X chromosomes comes  from the mother
and one from the father, having both my mother and her half sister’s X results
will yield a clear look at their father’s (Clifford) X marker.  My mother and my aunt should match the X
completely because the X chromosome is passed down from a person’s father
relatively unchanged.  Thus, by testing
two females with the same father we can basically jump a generation.  Their father, Clifford, received his X from
his mother, Mary Elizabeth Manning which is a mix of her parents, approximately
50% from each.  Mary received her two X
chromosomes from each parent so Clifford has a 50-50 chance to have received
his X from his grandfather (John William Manning) and 50-50 chance from his
grandmother (Eliza Fannin). His grandfather received his X from his great
grandmother (Minerva Tolliver Mannin). If, as family legend says, Minerva was full-blooded
Cherokee, Because Clifford whould have received about 50% of his X DNA from
Minerva, we should be able to see some markers that are in common with Cherokee
people if she was, in fact, Cherokee. The other great thing about this test is
that Clifford should have also received about 25% of his X from Eliza’s parents
both of whom are unknown. It certainly has the potential to open up a whole new
area of investigation.
Using the X isn’t as clearly defining as using
the Y chromosome but it clearly can yield more definitive results than the other
22 chromosomes typically do. I am very excited about pursuing this direction. One of the really cool things about your X Chromosome inheritance is that the potential surnames follow a really clear pattern. In my case the surnames of interest are:

Brown, 
Montran, 
Mannin(g), 
Barber, 
Fannin, 
Blackhurst, 
Toliver, 
Taylor, 
Cochron. 

Conclusion

DNA is a helpful tool. It has the potential to break down some brick walls, as it did for my Blackhurst tree. However, it is not likely to magically solve a problem or give answers to difficult questions.
There are a number of utilities that can help understand the matches I’ll look at them in a future blog posting. In the meantime, I’ll continue my searching in this area.

————Disclaimer ————-