Ancestor Bio – Ethel May Carr Newcomb (1885-1977)

52 Ancestors – Week 2018-09
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.Ethel May Carr was born, raised, and married in Somerville, Massachusetts. After marriage, she and her husband settled in Hingham, Massachusetts for several years. After their four children were born, she and her husband moved to Maine, first to Portland then out to Peak’s Island. She was widowed at the age of 71 and died 21 years later at the age of 92.

Blanchard Project 2018 – Ancestor BU11

List of Grandparents

  • Grandmother: Priscella May Newcomb
  • 1st Great-grandmother: Ethel May Carr
  • 2nd Great-grandfather: John Harvey Carr

Ethel May Carr Newcomb (1885-1977)

Ethel May Carr was born on 23 Sep 1885 in Somerville, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. She was one of 14 children of John Harvey and Mary Ann (O’Mara) Carr. I have not discovered information on three of Ethel’s siblings that died before 1900, but her other ten siblings are:

Name Born Died
Berlada Laura Carr [Newcomb]*[i] 1874 1959
James Joseph Carr 1875 1895
William Harvey Carr 1877
Peter E Carr 1880 1906
John C Carr 1882
Jennie L Carr 1882 1883
Arthur H Carr 1883
Charles F Carr 1888
George Putney Carr 1889 1889
Ralph S Carr 1891

Certainly, six siblings who died young would have had a significant impact on her life. Adding to that tragedy in her life was the death of her father, John Harvey Carr, sometime before 1900. Her mother is identified as a widow and head of household in the 1900 Census.


When she was 17, she married Horace Upton Newcomb, son of Alexander Newcomb and Amelia Jane Allen, on 07 Sep 1903 in Somerville, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. Geo. Whitaker, Minister of the Gospel, from Cambridge, MA, performed the ceremony.

Ethel and Horace were blessed with four children, namely:

  • Horace Arthur Newcomb
  • Priscilla May Newcomb
  • Theodore H Newcomb
  • Hugh Earl Newcomb

In contrast to her mother, Ethel only saw the death of one of her children; Hugh died in 1960 at the age of 50.

Shortly after their marriage Ethel and Horace moved to Hingham, MA. Sometime after 1910 and before 1918, Ethel and Horace moved to Maine. They lived at 14 North Street, Portland.

The 1920 Census indicates that they lived at 144 North Street. At first, I thought there might be a mistake in their address. However, I learned that the current 14 North Street was built in 1920. Today, 144 North Street is another much newer building, so I suspect they did live at both those addresses, but neither building still exist.

In 1927, Ethel and Horace acquired property on Peaks Island. The couple lived on Peaks Island until the death of Horace in 1956. After Horace’s death, Ethel moved to the mainland and in 1957 lived at 7 Avon Place in Portland.


Although Ethel was born in the United States, women who married aliens took on the citizenship of their spouse. So, the effect of marrying Horace was that she became a Canadian Citizen. She renounced and abjured allegiance to King Edward and became a citizen of the United States once again on 7 April 1936. Her husband became a citizen of the United States nine months later, on 5 January 1937.


Marker – Horace U & Ethel M Newcomb

Ethel died in Brunswick, Maine on 19 March 1977 at the age of 91. She was buried with Horace at Brooklawn Memorial Park in Portland.


  • 1900 Census (FS), Family Search, Mary Carr – Somerville, Middlesex, Massachusetts – ED 929, Sheet 10. “United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch ( : accessed 19 February 2018), Ralph S Carr in household of Mary Carr, Somerville city Ward 2, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 929, sheet 10B, family 208, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1972.); FHL microfilm 1,240,665.
  • 1910 Census (NARA), Family Search, Horace Newcomb – Hingham, Plymouth, Massachusetts. “United States Census, 1910,” database with images, FamilySearch ( : accessed 13 October 2017), Horace Newcomb, Hingham, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) ED 1217, sheet 18A, family 427, NARA microfilm publication T624 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1982), roll 612; FHL microfilm 1,374,625.
  • 1920 Census (NARA), Family Search, Horace W Newcomb – Portland, Cumberland, Maine, United States. “United States Census, 1920,” database with images, FamilySearch ( : accessed 13 October 2017), Horace W Newcomb, Portland Ward 1, Cumberland, Maine, United States; citing ED 28, sheet 3A, line 40, family 57, NARA microfilm publication T625 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1992), roll 639; FHL microfilm 1,820,639.
  • Find a Grave, Find A Grave, Ethyl May Carr Newcomb (1885-1977) – Memorial 132642017. Find A Grave, database and images ( : accessed 19 February 2018), memorial page for Ethel May Carr Newcomb (23 Sep 1885–19 Mar 1977), Find A Grave Memorial no. 132642017, citing Brooklawn Memorial Park, Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, USA ; Maintained by townsendburial (contributor 47629974).
  • Find a Grave, Find A Grave, Horace Upton Newcomb – Memorial #132641945.
  • Find a Grave, Find A Grave, Theodore H. Newcomb, Sr. (1907-1986). Find A Grave, database and images ( : accessed 16 December 2017), memorial page for Theodore H. Newcomb, Sr (1907–1986), Find A Grave Memorial no. 168925076, citing Melrose Cemetery, Brockton, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, USA ; Maintained by Jody Payne (contributor 47680228).
  • Maine, Federal Naturalization Records, 1787-1952, Ancestry, Ethel May Newcomb – Petition. Source Citation – National Archives at Boston; Waltham, Massachusetts; ARC Title: Petitions and Records of Naturalization, 1790 – 11/1945; Record Group Title: Records of District Courts of the United States, 1685-2009; Record Group Number: RG 21.
  • Maine, Federal Naturalization Records, 1787-1952, Ancestry, Horace Upton Newcomb – Petition. Source Citation National Archives at Boston; Waltham, Massachusetts; ARC Title: Petitions and Records of Naturalization, 1790 – 11/1945; Record Group Title: Records of District Courts of the United States, 1685-2009; Record Group Number: RG 21.
  • Massachusetts Births and Christenings, 1639-­1915, Priscilla May Newcomb. Citing this Record “Massachusetts Births and Christenings, 1639­1915,” database, FamilySearch (­CF8 : 4 December 2014), Priscilla May Newcomb, 06 Aug 1905; citing , 18­13; FHL microfilm 2,080,164.
  • Massachusetts Births, 1841-1915, Family Search, Horace Arthur Newcomb – 5 Dec 1903. “Massachusetts Births, 1841-1915,” database with images, FamilySearch : 1 March 2016), Horace V. Newcomb in entry for Horace Arthur Newcomb, 05 Dec 1903, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts; citing reference ID #p 309, Massachusetts Archives, Boston; FHL microfilm 2,057,436. http://(
  • Massachusetts Births, 1841-1915, Family Search, Hugh Earl Newcomb. “Massachusetts Births, 1841-1915,” database with images, FamilySearch ( : 9 August 2017), Hugh Earl Newcomb, 20 Dec 1909, , Hingham, Massachusetts, United States; citing reference ID #p 184 no77, Massachusetts Archives, Boston; FHL microfilm 2,315,253.
  • Massachusetts Births, 1841-1915, Family Search, Theodore Harvey Newcomb – 19 Aug 1907. “Massachusetts Births, 1841-1915,” database with images, FamilySearch ( : 1 March 2016), Theodore Harvey Newcomb, 19 Aug 1907, Hingham, , Massachusetts; citing reference ID #52, Massachusetts Archives, Boston; FHL microfilm 2,315,133.
  • Massachusetts Marriages, 1841-1915, Family Search, Horace Newcomb & Ethel May Carr. “Massachusetts Marriages, 1841-1915,” database with images, FamilySearch ( : 30 July 2017), Horace Allen Newcomb and Ethel May Carr, 07 Sep 1903; citing , Somerville, Massachusetts, United States, State Archives, Boston; FHL microfilm 2,057,588.
  • Social Security Death Index (SSA), Family Search, Ethel Newcomb [Carr] (1885-1977). Source Citation
Number: 004-64-6432; Issue State: Maine; Issue Date: 1973.
  • S. City Directories, 1822-1995, Ancestry, Portland, Maine – 1957 – Page 520 – Newcomb. Original data: Original sources vary according to directory. The title of the specific directory being viewed is listed at the top of the image viewer page. Check the directory title page image for full title and publication information.
  • United States World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918, Family Search, Horace Upton Newcomb – Portland, Cumberland, Maine.


[i] Interestingly enough, 11 years after Horace and Ethel were married, Horace’s brother, Hugh, and Ethel’s sister, Berlada, were married. It was Berlada’s second marriage.

Where my Ancestors were 100 years ago.

Mappy Monday
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.Randy Seaver in his blog, Genea-Musings suggested that we look at where our ancestors were 100 years ago. I thought I’d take a stab at it more from a location perspective. In October 1917, my ancestors were in Illinois, Indiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, and Minnesota. Just “I” and “M” states. My paternal side are the “I” states; the Roberts were in Illinois and the Scotts were in Indiana. My maternal side are the “M” states; the Browns were in Minnesota and the Montrans (Barbers) were in Michigan, except for my grandmother, Madonna (Donna) who lived in Massachusetts for a short time.

Map of my Ancestor locations in 1917.
My Ancestor Locations in 1917.

Paternal Side:

My paternal grandfather, Bert Allen Roberts, was 14 years old. His father had died in 1908 and he was living with his mother, step-father, brother and two sisters. It isn’t clear if they were living in Turman, Sullivan County, Indiana (1910) or in Hutsonville, Crawford County, Illinois (1920), but I think they were still in Indiana.

Bert’s 71-year-old grandmother, Patience Ann (Marshall) (Dean) Roberts was living in Sesser, Barren Township, Franklin County, Illinois.

Bert’s 34-year-old mother, Clora Dell (Scott) (Roberts) Adams was married to Hosea Adams. It is unclear if they were still in Turman, Sullivan, Indiana, or if they had relocated to Hutsonville, Crawford County, Illinois in 1917.

Clora’s father, Samuel Vaden Scott, had remarried Lavina Allmend after the death of Amanda Jane Haley. The 57-year old was living in Goode Township, Franklin County, Illinois.

My paternal grandmother, Essie Pansy Barnes, was 14 years old. She was living on the farm near Turman, Sullivan County, Indiana.

Essie’s father, Joel Clinton Barnes, was 60 years old and living on a farm near Graysville, Turman Township, Sullivan County, Indiana.

Essie’s mother, Marada A. (Lister) Barnes, was 50 years old and living with Joen on the farm near Graysville, Turman Township, Sullivan County, Indiana.


Maternal side

My maternal grandfather, Clifford D Brown, later known as Richard Earl Durand and even later as Richard Earl Brown, (Grandpa Dick) was also 14 years-old. He lived with his family in Backus, Cass County, Minnesota.

Clifford/Richard’s father, Arthur Durwood Brown, was 48-years-old and living in Backus, Cass County, Minnesota.

Clifford/Richard’s mother, Mary Elizabeth (Manning) Brown, was 39-years-old and living with her husband, Arthur, in Backus.

My maternal grandmother, Madonna Mae Montran, (later known as Donna) was married to Thomas Valentine Rooney (her second marriage). (It does not appear that she ever took his surname.) They were probably living in Wrentham, Norfolk County, Massachusetts, although they may have located to New York City about that time.  Madonna’s father died before 1900 and I have been unsuccessful in determining his parents.

Madonna’s (Donna’s) mother, Ida Mae (Barber) (Montran) (Fisher) (Holdsworth) Knight was living with her 4th husband, Harvey Knight in Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan.

Ida’s mother, Sarah H (Blackhurst) Barber was also living in Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan. Her husband, Frank Barber, died earlier in 1917.


Thirteen of my direct ancestors were alive in September 1917. That is all four of my grandparents, six of my great-grandparents, and three of my 14 known great-great-grandparents.

Based upon their locations in 1917, I can say my father’s line came from Illinois and Indiana and my mother’s line came from Michigan and Minnesota.  I have a birthplace chart that shows where my ancestors were born that tells a somewhat different story. Grandpa Dick was born in North Dakota but was in Minnesota in 1917. Similarly, my great-grandmother, Mary (Manning) Brown, was born in Kentucky but was in Minnesota in 1917.

My life locations provide some of greatest location distances of anyone I know. I was born in Portland, Oregon; I hail from Minnesota, having lived there during most of my youth and over 35 years total. Over the years, I have lived in Oregon, Minnesota, Michigan, Colorado, Montana, California, Virginia, Hawaii, Massachusetts, West Virginia, Georgia, and Maine. Now, I live about 3,200 miles away from my birth location of Portland, Oregon, in Portland, Maine.

Handy Genealogy Handbooks – “All You Need to Find Genealogy Resources FAST!”

Website Review – Lost Cousins

Tech Tuesday – Lost Cousin

Review by Don Taylor

I recently was listening to a podcast about the UK based service Lost Cousins. I had heard of it before, but I hadn’t given it a try nor had I looked at it for what it might be able to do to help folks in their genealogical research.

The primary purpose of LostCousins.Com is to help you find lost cousins so that you may better collaborate in your genealogical research. Most sites that connect you with other researchers do so based upon name and submitted tree information. This leads to many potential connections but few actual relatives. Consequently, many connections are unlikely to respond to your queries because they are too distant, often related by marriage, sometimes by multiple marriages. Lost Cousins does it a bit different; they focus on the quality of matches to other researchers rather than the quantity of matches. They use key census records as the key to finding cousins. You tag an ancestor in a particular census, on a specific page, with a relationship to you. Another person does the same thing. For example, in the 1880 Census, my 2nd Great-Grandfather is listed.  If the same person on the same page of the census is your ancestor too, then we are related.

Signing up is very easy to do. The site has a free level which doesn’t require you to provide a credit card nor detailed personal information.  You only need to subscribe (pay) if you find a lost cousin that you want to contact. (A subscriber may contact you, but you need to be a subscriber to initiate the first contact.) Even then, the service is very inexpensive (£10 per year).

Although Lost Cousins uses eight specific census records, the majority of users enter data into either the 1881 England & Wales Census or the 1880 US Census. The vast majority of my ancestors were in the United States in 1880, so I began entering my ancestors into the system.  For the 1880 Census, they ask you to enter the Roll / Film number, Page / Sheet number and letter, Surname, Forename, Age, and Relationship to you (typically, “blood relative” or “direct ancestor”).  In my case, into the 1880 US Census, I entered Roll 575, Page 374A, Surname Barber, Forename Frank, Age 40, and Direct Descendant. (Note: I entered “Frank” as he was entered into the census and not “Franklin” as was his actual name.) Then, I entered a second person, Asa Roberts and all was well. Neither of them had any cousin matches, but that was okay. I knew I have lots more ancestors to enter.

After only two entries, I ran into MY problem. I realized, particularly in some of my Family Tree Maker corrupted source entries (see Review and Rant), but also, some of my early entries didn’t have all of the information that I should have entered. Sure, I had enough information to find the record again, Name, Place, and Census Year is sufficient to search and find most entries, but it wasn’t the right information to enter into Lost Cousins. So, I need to go back and clean up some of my Census Record citations. That’s okay; I should clean them up regardless. I  entered other direct ancestors into the system, but so far no matches to cousins.

The eight censuses that Lost Cousins uses are:

  • 1841 England & Wales
  • 1880 United States
  • 1881 Canada
  • 1881 England & Wales
  • 1881 Scotland
  • 1911 England & Wales
  • 1911 Ireland
  • 1940 United States

In the two I entered, I did the “Search for Cousins.” No matches.  I’m not surprised. With only two entries in the 1880 US Census, Lost Cousins suggests I only have a match potential of 0.06%.

There are two ways for me to increase the likelihood of finding a lost cousin. First, I need to enter more of my ancestors from any of the above censuses into their system. Second, more cousins need to register and enter their ancestors into the system. I can take care of the first item, but I need you to help out by you to fulfill the second item. So, if you aren’t registered with Lost Cousins, I encourage you to register. Maybe, we are lost cousins, but if you don’t register we may never know.

The process doesn’t take long, and there is a potential for a big hit. Consequently, I think it is time well spent. The process of adding ancestors brought to my attention the need for me to clean up some of the census citations in my records.  Sigh….

Note:  Lost Cousins also produces a newsletter that registered individuals may subscribe to. Past newsletters are searchable, so registration may not only provide leads on lost cousins but may also provide leads regarding other websites and resources.

Reminder to Self:

  • Never take shortcuts in source citations!

My Future Actions:

  • Clean up my sources for the 1880 US Census, the 1881 England & Wales Census, and the 1881 Canadian Census.
  • Enter remaining ancestors with 1880 or 1881 census entries into Lost Cousins.

———- DISCLAIMER ———-

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Don’t avoid those Bright Shiny Objects.

Brown Research

Bright Shiny Objects - Photo by arbyreed - CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
Bright Shiney Objects

Photo by Arbyreed (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)


I’ll admit it; I get diverted from my goals by Bright Shiny Objects (BSOs).  I was working on a problem ancestor of mine, my third great-grandmother, Mary C. LNU (Last Name Unknown), about whom I know very little.

Bio – Mary C. (LNU) Brown (1823-?)

What I think I know:

  • She was born about 1824 in New York.[i]
  • She probably married Barney/Daney Brown about 1841.[ii]
  • In 1850, she was living with her apparent husband, Barney, and two children, William H and Myron O Brown in Saline, Washtenaw County, Michigan.[iii]
  • In 1860, she and her apparent husband, Daney, were living with four children, Henry W, Myron O, Alice C. and David V. Brown in Saline, Washtenaw County, Michigan.[iv]
  • In the 1870 census, it appears that she is living alone.[v] Her son, Henry, was married and making a life with his wife and two children nearby. Not sure where Myron, Alice, or David were. I can’t find them nor their father, Barney/Daney, in the 1870 census either. So, I figured he possibly died in the Civil War. Certainly, I have a lot more research to do to determine if one of the many Browns who fought for the Union was my Barney/Daney Brown.


After I had figured out that I had exhausted my many searching methods on Family Search, Ancestry, and Genealogy in Time (read Google) for Mary, Barney/Daney, and the children, I thought I’d see if there were any newspapers of the area. I like using The Ancestor Hunt to seek out newspapers. I research Michigan enough that I have a bookmark right to Kenneth Mark’s Michigan page in my browser. I click it, then do a {Control/f} to “find” type “Saline” and–Bang–there were three newspapers listed for Saline. One was 1958-2014, outside of my possible range. But two were in the 1800s, both at Central Michigan University. So, off I go (metaphorically speaking).

Digital Michigan Newspapers – It is a “Bright Shiny Object.”

I quickly figured out how to search only the Saline papers and found lots of articles about various Browns, but none that appeared to be about this family unit.  (It might be really helpful if I decide to do a locational surname study.)  But this is a nice site.  I’d just bet I can find some juicy bits of information there – It It looks like it is a BSO!

Newspaper Clipping - Obituary - Janette A. Arnold Wakefield Parsons
Obituary Janette A. Arnold Wakefield Parsons

I went back to my genealogy program (I use Heredis) and selected the people who had any event in Saline in my database – 45 people.  I’ll bet some of these people are in those papers. As I worked through the list, at first I didn’t find articles about lots of them, A tantalizing bit here and there, like Sarah Young had perfect attendance in school in 1881. Then, I hit some really important articles. My 4th great-grandfather, Chester Parsons’ personal property was auctioned off by the administrator of his estate. Awesome detail of what was going up for sale, “12 cows, 16 head young cattle, seven head horses, 52 acres wheat on the ground and a large quantity of farm implements. Eighty acres of timber land is also offered for sale at a bargain.”  Very interesting stuff. I even learned that someone named Daniel Reeves lived on Chester Parson’s farm for six years, including two years while Chester was still alive.[vi] Who was Daniel Reeves and why was he living on the Parson farm?  I also found the obituary for Chester Parson’s second wife, which provided the date he married her, her maiden and widowed names, and her daughter’s names.  Those names might be helpful when I find Chester Parsons’ probate records.

The bottom line is that in a couple hours of investigating this BSO, I learned a couple dozen facts, developed several new avenues of inquiry and had a lot of fun.  I know that I probably should have kept to my research goal: What was Mary C [Brown]’s maiden surname? I still don’t know the answer to that, but I do know lots of new things. So it is okay with me that I diverted to look at the BSOs. The information I found added texture to my understanding of the lives of several ancestors. So, I’m glad I didn’t toss aside that Bright Shiney Object once I knew it wouldn’t answer my research question. I hope you find BSOs you can have fun with also.

Future Actions:

  • Research Mary C. [Brown] and determine her maiden surname, place of birth, death, etc. (Again.)
  • Find the Probate Records for Chester Parsons (1799-1887) – Washtenaw County, Michigan.
  • Determine if Barney/Daney Brown served in the Civil War.
  • Determine if there is a relationship between Daniel Reeves and the Parsons family.
———-  DISCLAIMER  ———-
newspapers-com-234x60-2  newspapers-com-234x60-2


  • [i] The 1850, 1860, and 1870 census records for her are all consistent, 26, 36, and 46 years old respectively.
  • [ii] Their first child, William Henry Brown, was born about 1842 in Michigan.
  • [iii] United States Census, 1850,” database with images, FamilySearch ( : accessed 23 March 2016), Barney Brown, Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan, United States; citing family 185, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • [iv] “United States Census, 1860”, database with images, FamilySearch ( : accessed 23 March 2016), Daney Brown, 1860.
  • [v] Year: 1870; Census Place: Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan; Roll: M593_708; Page: 315B; Image: 166772; Family History Library Film: 552207 1870 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.
  • [vi] Saline Observer (Saline, MI) – 1891-12-10, Pg 5, Column 2 (last paragraph) – via Digital Michigan Newspapers; Central Michigan University

newspapers-com-234x60-2 newspapers-com-234x60-2

A brief look at my wife’s aunt’s grandfather – Nicholas Edward Drexl

 Darling/Drexl Line

In May, I was visiting family in Michigan and had the opportunity to get to know my wife’s aunt much better. While I was there, we chatted about genealogy (surprise, surprise) and I learned she didn’t know much about her maternal grand-grandfather, Nicholas Edward Drexl. (She and my wife’s mother share a common father but different mothers.) My wife’s aunt knew her grandfather was born in Germany, lived in Saint Paul, MN and Saint Louis, MO, and died before she was born. While I was there, I helped her learn a few more things, thanks to the Ancestry App, but, I knew I really wanted to help her learn a lot more.

After I returned home and had a chance take the time to research Nicholas’s life, I quickly learned that he was born in Germany and came to the US as a child. As is so often the case, one fact leads to two new questions. In this case, I knew he immigrated and was naturalized; the questions arose in my mind, exactly when and on what ship did he immigrate. I did learn that his naturalization was the result of his being a minor when his father became a citizen, but, I’ve been unsuccessful proving when and where that occurred. (Naturalization records often provide detailed birth information, so I might learn exactly where in Germany the family came from.)

I’ve searched, and searched, and searched to no avail. So, those questions are still out there and I’m sure I’ll find the answer someplace, but it will just have to wait until I have more time. I did learn a lot about Nick Drexl’s life though.

Nicholas E. Drexl (1880-1939)

Nicholas E. Drexl was born in Germany on 29 November 1880[1] to Frank Xaver and Ursula (Eggert) Drexl. He is the oldest of the known children of Frank and Ursula. However, it is possible that he had one older sibling. The 1900 Census provides clues to many facts. First of all, it identifies that Ursula had had 12 children, 8 of whom were living. It also indicates that they had been married for 20 years. If that is the case his parents were married between June 1879 and June 1, 1880. That would have left a 17 to 29-month gap between his parent’s marriage and his birth; enough time for there to have been an older sibling who died as a child.

Looking at the children of Ursula, there were two large gaps where children could have been born and could have died before the 1900 census was enumerated.

Place Born
29 Nov 1880
17 Months to Christina
Apr 1882
52 Months – One certainly, two likely.
Aug 1886
22 Months to Katie
Oct 1888
25 Months to Mary
Mary (Marie)
Nov 1890
26 Months to Joseph
22 Jan 1893
St. Paul, MN
34 Months – One likely
Nov 1895
St. Paul, MN
46 Months – One likely, two possible
16 September 1899
St. Paul, MN
Census 8 months later
Not applicable
* Minnesota Census of 1895 indicates Charles was six months old, (born Nov 1894) however, the 1900 Census indicates Charles was born in Nov 1895.

In any event, when Nickolas was about three-years-old (1884), he, his parents, and his sister immigrated to the United States[2]. Childhood must have been difficult. His parents were Germany speaking immigrants that were constantly on the move. We know he lived in the following locations as a child:

1884 – Germany
1886 – Illinois
1888 – Kansas
1890 – Kansas
1892 – Minnesota
1895 – Minnesota (St. Paul)
1900 – Minnesota

In 1900, his father was a cabinet maker and his mother was a jeweler[3]. It was probably during his childhood that he learned jewelry making from his mother, because he would be a jeweler during the rest of his life.

On 17 May 1904, Nick married Hedwig Frances Stoeger, who was also a German immigrant. Hattie, as she was known, had immigrated with her parents in 1885. They were married by Rev. Peter Schuririer, a Roman Catholic priest. The marriage was witnessed by George Bleckhinger and Frances Drexl (probably Nick’s sister Francis).

Their first child, Clarence T. was born eight and a half months later, on 31 January 1905.

Raymond F was born on 15 May, 1908.

595 Stryker Avenue, Saint Paul – Today
Photo via Google Maps

The 1910 Census shows the young family living at 595 Stryker Ave., Saint Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota. Living with Nick and Hattie is a 17-year-old niece of Nick’s. Her name was Marie T Markert. I haven’t determined exactly how she is related yet. Further research needs to be done on Nick and Hattie’s siblings to determine.Their daughter, Mary (possibly Marie), was probably born in 1917.

Sometime before 1918, the family moved to 604 Winslow Ave., Saint Paul. While there, Nick worked as a jeweler at E. Schmalz & Sons, 87 E. 6th St., Saint Paul. His draft registration card indicates that he was tall, medium build, gray eyes, and light hair.

In April, 1920, another daughter, Florence, was born.

The 1920 census-taker found the family still living at 604 Winslow Ave and Nick still working as a jeweler[4].

In 1926, the family moved to Saint Louis, Missouri.

Marker: Nicholas & Hedwig Drexl
Source: Find-a-Grave Memorial 50475159

The 1930 Census finds the Drexl family living at 2425 Coleman Street, Saint Louis. Living with Nick and Hattie is their son Clarence, Clarence’s wife (Ruth), and Clarence’s son, Donald. Also in the household is thirteen-year-old Marie and ten-year-old Florence.[5]

Nicholas Edward Drexl died on 13 October 1939[6]. He was buried on 17 October at Section 25, Lot 2212 in Calvary Cemetery and Mausoleum, Saint Louis, MO[7].

Further Actions:

Determine Immigration and Naturalization facts for Nick & family.
Search for records regarding unknown siblings of Nick.
Research the siblings of Nick and Hattie and determine the relationship of Marie T Markert who is a niece of Nick.

List of Greats

Frank Xaver Drexl


If you are related to Nicholas Edward Drexl, or anyone else in this Drexl line, my wife’s aunt and I would love to hear from you. Please contact us using the contact form below.


[1]; U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918; Nick Edward Drexel (Drexl).
[2] The 1900 Census indicates 1884; the 1910 Census indicates 1888; the 1920 census indicates 1886.
[3] Family Search; 1900 Census; Frank Drexl;
[4]; 1920 Census; Nicholas Drexl – St Paul Ward 6, Ramsey, Minnesota, United States;
[5] Family Search; 1930 Census; Nick (Nicholas) Drexl;
[6]; U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007; Nicholas Drexl

[7] Find a Grave; Nicholas E Drexl – Memorial# 50475159;;

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