William Hunt Scott (1834-1903)

Ancestor Sketch
Roberts-Scott Line
By Don Taylor

Roberts Research 2019 – Ancestor #36

List of Grandparents

  1. – Grandfather: Bert Allen Roberts (1903-1949)
  2. – 1st Great-grandmother: Clora Dell Scott Roberts Adams (1883-1945)
  3. – 2nd Great-grandfather: Samuel Vaden Scott(1862-1931) & More
  4. – 3rd Great-grandfather: William Hunter Scott (c. 1834-1903)
  5. – 4th Great-grandfather: Samuel Kinkade Scott (1809-?)[1]
  6. – 5th Great-Grandfather: John Scott (1784-1856)
  7. – 6th Great-Grandfather: William Jarvis Scott (? – ?)
  8. – 7th Great-Grandfather: James Scott (1719-1783)

William Hunt Scott (c.1834-1903)

Birth

William Hunt Scott was born in Turkey Hill, St. Clair County Illinois about 1834. His father, John Scott, came to Illinois with his father in s1797 and along with five brothers and one brother-in-law established the “Turkey Hill” colony in present-day St. Clair County. This was the first American settlement in the county.

In other news of the times, The Black Hawk War had ended only two years before his birth. John Reynolds resigned as Governor of Illinois to become a Representative to the US Congress. William Lee Ewing took his place as governor for about three weeks until newly elected Joseph Duncan became the sixth governor of Illinois, and the first, and only, Whig to that office.

Childhood

William grew up as the oldest of six children.  His five siblings included:

Name Born
Sarah 1836
Mary 1839
Francis/Franklin 1840
Emily 1845
Rachel 1849

All were born in St. Clair County.

The 1840 Census indicates the Samuel Scott family of St Clair, Illinois consists of himself, apparently his wife and three children including William. The other two are presumed to be Sarah and Mary.

The 1850 Census indicates the Samuel K Scott family of Turkey Hill, St. Clair, Illinois consists of Samuel, apparently his wife and six children. The 16-year-old William is farming, and four of his younger siblings (Sarah, Mary, Francis, and Emily) are attending school.

Marriage to Emily Hendricks.

Sometime between 1850 and 1860 (probably between 1850 and 1856), William located to Washington County, Illinois.

There, in 1856, when he was about 22 years old, William married Emily Maples Hendricks.

They had four children together.

Name Born Location
Viola 1860 Washington Co.
Samuel Vaden 1863 Washington Co.
Francis Perry 1870 St. Clair Co.
William Alonzo 1871 St. Clair Co.

Adult

The 1860 Census indicates they lived in Township 3S, Range 4W. Today that township is now known as Elkton Township. The towns of Elkton and Oakdale (Ayers Point Post Office) lie within it. Both are about 5 miles southwest of Nashville, Illinois. The family consisted of William, Emily, and their oldest child, Viola. William was a farmer.

I have not found evidence, yet, regarding William and the Civil War. I would expect a 27-year-old of the time to have served. There are hundreds of “William Scott’s” who served in Illinois and determining if this William Scott served is a future project for me.

The 1870 Census showed the family back in St. Clair County and enumerated in Freeburg. The family consists of William, Emily, and three of the children, Viola, Sam, and 3-month-old Francis. William is working as a “Wagon Maker.” Viola and Sam are attending school.

On 27 October 1878 Emily died.  What happened to William after that is mostly unknown. Samuel married Amanda Jane Haley in May 1879. Viola married Charles Monroe Kansas Galloway two months later, in July 1879. I have been unsuccessful finding William in the 1880 Census. It appears that the other children may have been scattered as I’ve been unable to find them either.

Marriage to Matilda T (Cooper) Elkins

Several researchers indicate that William Hunt Scott married Matilda T. Elkins (nee Cooper) on Dec 16, 1885, in Franklin County, IL. That seems likely, but I haven’t found compelling evidence that the William Scott that married Matilda was this William Scott.

I’ve been unable to find William or Matilda in the 1900 Census.

Death & Burial

Finally, some researchers indicate that William H Scott died 13 May 1903 in Farmington, St. Francois County, Missouri. Again, I’ve been unable to verify that this William H Scott is my William Hunt Scott. There is a William Scott buried at the Glenda Cemetery, buried at Glenda Cemetery in Farmington. If you have evidence indicating this William Scott is the same one as above, I would love to hear from you.

Further Actions / Follow-up

  • Do a Family Study looking for William’s children post 1878.
  • Do a Family Study looking at William’s siblings.

————–  Disclaimer  ————–

 


 Sources

William Hunt Scott is person LYQC-SF4 on FamilySearch.

  • “United States Census, 1840,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHBJ­5WZ : 15 August 2017), Samuel Scott, St Clair, Illinois, United States; citing p. 280, NARA microfilm publication M704, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 70; FHL microfilm 7,644.
  • “United States Census, 1850,” Census Place: Turkey Hill, St Clair, Illinois; Roll: M432_126; Page: 359A; Image: 360
  • “United States Census, 1860,” Census Place: Township 3 S Range 4 W, Washington, Illinois; Roll: M653_235; Page: 942; Family History Library Film: 803235
  • “United States Census, 1870,”
(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M6WN­2W2 : 17 October 2014), Sam Scott in household of Willin Scott, Illinois, United States; citing p. 18, family 122, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 545,778.
  • Chris H. Baily, The Jehu Scott Family (Eustis, FL, Chris H. Baily), Files (Personal), Person 10 – William Hunt Scott. Bailey, Chris, “The Jehu Scott Family” dated 7/16/16.
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 27 January 2019), memorial page for William H. Scott (unknown–13 May 1903), Find A Grave Memorial no. 13568645, citing Glenda Cemetery, Farmington, St. Francois County, Missouri, USA; Maintained by Clara & Terry L. Luster, Sr. (contributor 46485785) .
  • “Illinois, County Marriages, 1810-1940,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KFKW-85D : 3 March 2016), Samuel V. Scott and Amanda J. Haley, 24 May 1879; citing Franklin, Illinois, United States, county offices, Illinois; FHL microfilm 1,005,307.
  • “Illinois, County Marriages, 1810-1940,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KFKW-26N : 5 November 2017), Patience Marshall in an entry for Francis P. Scott and Florence E. Roberts, 24 Mar 1901; citing Franklin, Illinois, United States, county offices, Illinois; FHL microfilm 1,005,307.

Endnotes

[1] I have not independantly confirmed the ancestors of Samuel Kinkade. I am, however, confident that Samuel was William Hunt Scott’s father.

World Beard Day

World Beard Day Logo1 September 2018
by Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.Today, in recognition of World Beard Day, I’m recognizing some of my ancestral beards. I’ve had a beard most of my life. I didn’t have a beard for the first few years in the Navy, but while Admiral Zumwalt was the Chief of Naval Operations and beards were allowed, I too had one. I grew a full beard again after I got out of the service.  I shaved it off for a short time while I ran for City Council in Coon Rapids, Minnesota, but promptly grew it back after I failed to win. My wife has never seen me without a beard except in photos and we’ve been together since 1991. She says shaving it off would be grounds for separation.

My Maternal Side – Mannin & Parsons

Photo of Enoch Mannin
Enoch Mannin

My 3rd great-grandfather, Enoch Mannin had the most amazing chin-curtains ever. I find chin-curtains to be beards without the benefit of not shaving. Chin-curtains require daily shaving of the face. Mustache area, cheeks, and chin are all shaved daily. Only the area under the jawline is left to grow. I find shaving under the jawline and shaving the neck to be the easiest part of shaving, so leaving that natural and shaving the more difficult areas seems odd to me.

Image of Chester Parsons
Chester Parsons

My 4th great-grandfather, Chester Parsons also had interesting chin-curtains as well. In The History of Washtenaw County, Michigan, Page 437, a drawing of Chester Parsons shows his chin-curtains were gray in the center under his chin and dark on the sides.

 

My Paternal Side –

Samuel Vaden Scott
Samuel Vaden Scott

Although he was clearly a working man, my 2nd great-grandfather, Samuel Vaden Scott, had a nice, well-groomed beard (at least when the photo was taken).

 

 

 

Photo of William Hunter Scott
William Hunter Scott

His father, my 3rd great-grandfather, William Hunter Scott had a full beard. The photo I have of him shows a beard much like mine was several years ago – white on the sides with salt & pepper on the chin and mustache. He had an interesting face.

Others

Photo of Henry Conn
Henry Conn

Although not related directly to me Henry Conn, Sr., the 3rd great-grandfather of my nephews Mike & Luke, had wild hair, a full beard, and a twisted bar mustache. He was an Oregon pioneer.

———-

Some years ago, I worked for a military organization as a civilian. Some of the leadership there were active duty officers. When one of the majors came on board and was introduced to the employees. When he was introduced to me the first words he had for me weren’t, “Hello, nice to meet you” or anything similar. Rather his first words were, “When are you going to get a shave and a haircut?” A couple weeks later, I was in the cafeteria with a couple other bearded employees. I saw that Major A. was coming over to our table. Upon his arrival, I segued the conversation to beards. I asked the table if they knew how shaving became popular in Western Culture. When no one knew the answer, I said it came from “the Greeks, some of whom wanted to keep their boyish appearance for their men lovers.” Major A. never again suggested I shave.

Today, on World Beard Day, I remember all my ancestors who had beards.


 

Ancestor Bio – Ethel May Carr Newcomb (1885-1977)

52 Ancestors – Week 2018-09
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.Ethel May Carr was born, raised, and married in Somerville, Massachusetts. After marriage, she and her husband settled in Hingham, Massachusetts for several years. After their four children were born, she and her husband moved to Maine, first to Portland then out to Peak’s Island. She was widowed at the age of 71 and died 21 years later at the age of 92.

Blanchard Project 2018 – Ancestor BU11

List of Grandparents

  • Grandmother: Priscella May Newcomb
  • 1st Great-grandmother: Ethel May Carr
  • 2nd Great-grandfather: John Harvey Carr

Ethel May Carr Newcomb (1885-1977)

Ethel May Carr was born on 23 Sep 1885 in Somerville, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. She was one of 14 children of John Harvey and Mary Ann (O’Mara) Carr. I have not discovered information on three of Ethel’s siblings that died before 1900, but her other ten siblings are:

Name Born Died
Berlada Laura Carr [Newcomb]*[i] 1874 1959
James Joseph Carr 1875 1895
William Harvey Carr 1877
Peter E Carr 1880 1906
John C Carr 1882
Jennie L Carr 1882 1883
Arthur H Carr 1883
Charles F Carr 1888
George Putney Carr 1889 1889
Ralph S Carr 1891

Certainly, six siblings who died young would have had a significant impact on her life. Adding to that tragedy in her life was the death of her father, John Harvey Carr, sometime before 1900. Her mother is identified as a widow and head of household in the 1900 Census.

Marriage

When she was 17, she married Horace Upton Newcomb, son of Alexander Newcomb and Amelia Jane Allen, on 07 Sep 1903 in Somerville, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. Geo. Whitaker, Minister of the Gospel, from Cambridge, MA, performed the ceremony.

Ethel and Horace were blessed with four children, namely:

  • Horace Arthur Newcomb
  • Priscilla May Newcomb
  • Theodore H Newcomb
  • Hugh Earl Newcomb

In contrast to her mother, Ethel only saw the death of one of her children; Hugh died in 1960 at the age of 50.

Shortly after their marriage Ethel and Horace moved to Hingham, MA. Sometime after 1910 and before 1918, Ethel and Horace moved to Maine. They lived at 14 North Street, Portland.

The 1920 Census indicates that they lived at 144 North Street. At first, I thought there might be a mistake in their address. However, I learned that the current 14 North Street was built in 1920. Today, 144 North Street is another much newer building, so I suspect they did live at both those addresses, but neither building still exist.

In 1927, Ethel and Horace acquired property on Peaks Island. The couple lived on Peaks Island until the death of Horace in 1956. After Horace’s death, Ethel moved to the mainland and in 1957 lived at 7 Avon Place in Portland.

Story

Although Ethel was born in the United States, women who married aliens took on the citizenship of their spouse. So, the effect of marrying Horace was that she became a Canadian Citizen. She renounced and abjured allegiance to King Edward and became a citizen of the United States once again on 7 April 1936. Her husband became a citizen of the United States nine months later, on 5 January 1937.

Death

Marker – Horace U & Ethel M Newcomb

Ethel died in Brunswick, Maine on 19 March 1977 at the age of 91. She was buried with Horace at Brooklawn Memorial Park in Portland.



Sources:

  • 1900 Census (FS), Family Search, Mary Carr – Somerville, Middlesex, Massachusetts – ED 929, Sheet 10. “United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M9TX-8KW : accessed 19 February 2018), Ralph S Carr in household of Mary Carr, Somerville city Ward 2, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 929, sheet 10B, family 208, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1972.); FHL microfilm 1,240,665. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M9TX-8KW.
  • 1910 Census (NARA), Family Search, Horace Newcomb – Hingham, Plymouth, Massachusetts. “United States Census, 1910,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M2K8-RN7 : accessed 13 October 2017), Horace Newcomb, Hingham, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) ED 1217, sheet 18A, family 427, NARA microfilm publication T624 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1982), roll 612; FHL microfilm 1,374,625.
  • 1920 Census (NARA), Family Search, Horace W Newcomb – Portland, Cumberland, Maine, United States. “United States Census, 1920,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MFZ8-CSZ : accessed 13 October 2017), Horace W Newcomb, Portland Ward 1, Cumberland, Maine, United States; citing ED 28, sheet 3A, line 40, family 57, NARA microfilm publication T625 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1992), roll 639; FHL microfilm 1,820,639.
  • Find a Grave, Find A Grave, Ethyl May Carr Newcomb (1885-1977) – Memorial 132642017. Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 19 February 2018), memorial page for Ethel May Carr Newcomb (23 Sep 1885–19 Mar 1977), Find A Grave Memorial no. 132642017, citing Brooklawn Memorial Park, Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, USA ; Maintained by townsendburial (contributor 47629974). https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/132642017#.
  • Find a Grave, Find A Grave, Horace Upton Newcomb – Memorial #132641945. https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=132641945.
  • Find a Grave, Find A Grave, Theodore H. Newcomb, Sr. (1907-1986). Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 16 December 2017), memorial page for Theodore H. Newcomb, Sr (1907–1986), Find A Grave Memorial no. 168925076, citing Melrose Cemetery, Brockton, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, USA ; Maintained by Jody Payne (contributor 47680228). https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/168925076/theodore-h.-newcomb.
  • Maine, Federal Naturalization Records, 1787-1952, Ancestry, Ethel May Newcomb – Petition. Source Citation – National Archives at Boston; Waltham, Massachusetts; ARC Title: Petitions and Records of Naturalization, 1790 – 11/1945; Record Group Title: Records of District Courts of the United States, 1685-2009; Record Group Number: RG 21. https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?viewrecord=1&r=an&db=MENaturalizationRecordsOrigs&indiv=try&h=1081569.
  • Maine, Federal Naturalization Records, 1787-1952, Ancestry, Horace Upton Newcomb – Petition. Source Citation National Archives at Boston; Waltham, Massachusetts; ARC Title: Petitions and Records of Naturalization, 1790 – 11/1945; Record Group Title: Records of District Courts of the United States, 1685-2009; Record Group Number: RG 21. https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?viewrecord=1&r=an&db=MENaturalizationRecordsOrigs&indiv=try&h=1081569.
  • Massachusetts Births and Christenings, 1639-­1915, Priscilla May Newcomb. Citing this Record “Massachusetts Births and Christenings, 1639­1915,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F429­CF8 : 4 December 2014), Priscilla May Newcomb, 06 Aug 1905; citing , 18­13; FHL microfilm 2,080,164.
  • Massachusetts Births, 1841-1915, Family Search, Horace Arthur Newcomb – 5 Dec 1903. “Massachusetts Births, 1841-1915,” database with images, FamilySearch : 1 March 2016), Horace V. Newcomb in entry for Horace Arthur Newcomb, 05 Dec 1903, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts; citing reference ID #p 309, Massachusetts Archives, Boston; FHL microfilm 2,057,436. http://(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FXFK-CG6.
  • Massachusetts Births, 1841-1915, Family Search, Hugh Earl Newcomb. “Massachusetts Births, 1841-1915,” database with images, FamilySearch ( : 9 August 2017), Hugh Earl Newcomb, 20 Dec 1909, , Hingham, Massachusetts, United States; citing reference ID #p 184 no77, Massachusetts Archives, Boston; FHL microfilm 2,315,253. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FXJN-V2N.
  • Massachusetts Births, 1841-1915, Family Search, Theodore Harvey Newcomb – 19 Aug 1907. “Massachusetts Births, 1841-1915,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FXJQ-PNN : 1 March 2016), Theodore Harvey Newcomb, 19 Aug 1907, Hingham, , Massachusetts; citing reference ID #52, Massachusetts Archives, Boston; FHL microfilm 2,315,133.
  • Massachusetts Marriages, 1841-1915, Family Search, Horace Newcomb & Ethel May Carr. “Massachusetts Marriages, 1841-1915,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N44B-531 : 30 July 2017), Horace Allen Newcomb and Ethel May Carr, 07 Sep 1903; citing , Somerville, Massachusetts, United States, State Archives, Boston; FHL microfilm 2,057,588.
  • Social Security Death Index (SSA), Family Search, Ethel Newcomb [Carr] (1885-1977). Source Citation
Number: 004-64-6432; Issue State: Maine; Issue Date: 1973. http://Ancestry.com.
  • S. City Directories, 1822-1995, Ancestry, Portland, Maine – 1957 – Page 520 – Newcomb. Original data: Original sources vary according to directory. The title of the specific directory being viewed is listed at the top of the image viewer page. Check the directory title page image for full title and publication information. https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?viewrecord=1&r=an&db=USDirectories&indiv=try&h=901185029.
  • United States World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918, Family Search, Horace Upton Newcomb – Portland, Cumberland, Maine. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KZFY-G9Z.

Endnotes

[i] Interestingly enough, 11 years after Horace and Ethel were married, Horace’s brother, Hugh, and Ethel’s sister, Berlada, were married. It was Berlada’s second marriage.

Where my Ancestors were 100 years ago.

Mappy Monday
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.Randy Seaver in his blog, Genea-Musings suggested that we look at where our ancestors were 100 years ago. I thought I’d take a stab at it more from a location perspective. In October 1917, my ancestors were in Illinois, Indiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, and Minnesota. Just “I” and “M” states. My paternal side are the “I” states; the Roberts were in Illinois and the Scotts were in Indiana. My maternal side are the “M” states; the Browns were in Minnesota and the Montrans (Barbers) were in Michigan, except for my grandmother, Madonna (Donna) who lived in Massachusetts for a short time.

Map of my Ancestor locations in 1917.
My Ancestor Locations in 1917.

Paternal Side:

My paternal grandfather, Bert Allen Roberts, was 14 years old. His father had died in 1908 and he was living with his mother, step-father, brother and two sisters. It isn’t clear if they were living in Turman, Sullivan County, Indiana (1910) or in Hutsonville, Crawford County, Illinois (1920), but I think they were still in Indiana.

Bert’s 71-year-old grandmother, Patience Ann (Marshall) (Dean) Roberts was living in Sesser, Barren Township, Franklin County, Illinois.

Bert’s 34-year-old mother, Clora Dell (Scott) (Roberts) Adams was married to Hosea Adams. It is unclear if they were still in Turman, Sullivan, Indiana, or if they had relocated to Hutsonville, Crawford County, Illinois in 1917.

Clora’s father, Samuel Vaden Scott, had remarried Lavina Allmend after the death of Amanda Jane Haley. The 57-year old was living in Goode Township, Franklin County, Illinois.

My paternal grandmother, Essie Pansy Barnes, was 14 years old. She was living on the farm near Turman, Sullivan County, Indiana.

Essie’s father, Joel Clinton Barnes, was 60 years old and living on a farm near Graysville, Turman Township, Sullivan County, Indiana.

Essie’s mother, Marada A. (Lister) Barnes, was 50 years old and living with Joen on the farm near Graysville, Turman Township, Sullivan County, Indiana.

 

Maternal side

My maternal grandfather, Clifford D Brown, later known as Richard Earl Durand and even later as Richard Earl Brown, (Grandpa Dick) was also 14 years-old. He lived with his family in Backus, Cass County, Minnesota.

Clifford/Richard’s father, Arthur Durwood Brown, was 48-years-old and living in Backus, Cass County, Minnesota.

Clifford/Richard’s mother, Mary Elizabeth (Manning) Brown, was 39-years-old and living with her husband, Arthur, in Backus.

My maternal grandmother, Madonna Mae Montran, (later known as Donna) was married to Thomas Valentine Rooney (her second marriage). (It does not appear that she ever took his surname.) They were probably living in Wrentham, Norfolk County, Massachusetts, although they may have located to New York City about that time.  Madonna’s father died before 1900 and I have been unsuccessful in determining his parents.

Madonna’s (Donna’s) mother, Ida Mae (Barber) (Montran) (Fisher) (Holdsworth) Knight was living with her 4th husband, Harvey Knight in Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan.

Ida’s mother, Sarah H (Blackhurst) Barber was also living in Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan. Her husband, Frank Barber, died earlier in 1917.

Thoughts

Thirteen of my direct ancestors were alive in September 1917. That is all four of my grandparents, six of my great-grandparents, and three of my 14 known great-great-grandparents.

Based upon their locations in 1917, I can say my father’s line came from Illinois and Indiana and my mother’s line came from Michigan and Minnesota.  I have a birthplace chart that shows where my ancestors were born that tells a somewhat different story. Grandpa Dick was born in North Dakota but was in Minnesota in 1917. Similarly, my great-grandmother, Mary (Manning) Brown, was born in Kentucky but was in Minnesota in 1917.

My life locations provide some of greatest location distances of anyone I know. I was born in Portland, Oregon; I hail from Minnesota, having lived there during most of my youth and over 35 years total. Over the years, I have lived in Oregon, Minnesota, Michigan, Colorado, Montana, California, Virginia, Hawaii, Massachusetts, West Virginia, Georgia, and Maine. Now, I live about 3,200 miles away from my birth location of Portland, Oregon, in Portland, Maine.


Handy Genealogy Handbooks – “All You Need to Find Genealogy Resources FAST!”

Website Review – Lost Cousins

Tech Tuesday – Lost Cousin

Review by Don Taylor

I recently was listening to a podcast about the UK based service Lost Cousins. I had heard of it before, but I hadn’t given it a try nor had I looked at it for what it might be able to do to help folks in their genealogical research.

The primary purpose of LostCousins.Com is to help you find lost cousins so that you may better collaborate in your genealogical research. Most sites that connect you with other researchers do so based upon name and submitted tree information. This leads to many potential connections but few actual relatives. Consequently, many connections are unlikely to respond to your queries because they are too distant, often related by marriage, sometimes by multiple marriages. Lost Cousins does it a bit different; they focus on the quality of matches to other researchers rather than the quantity of matches. They use key census records as the key to finding cousins. You tag an ancestor in a particular census, on a specific page, with a relationship to you. Another person does the same thing. For example, in the 1880 Census, my 2nd Great-Grandfather is listed.  If the same person on the same page of the census is your ancestor too, then we are related.

Signing up is very easy to do. The site has a free level which doesn’t require you to provide a credit card nor detailed personal information.  You only need to subscribe (pay) if you find a lost cousin that you want to contact. (A subscriber may contact you, but you need to be a subscriber to initiate the first contact.) Even then, the service is very inexpensive (£10 per year).

Although Lost Cousins uses eight specific census records, the majority of users enter data into either the 1881 England & Wales Census or the 1880 US Census. The vast majority of my ancestors were in the United States in 1880, so I began entering my ancestors into the system.  For the 1880 Census, they ask you to enter the Roll / Film number, Page / Sheet number and letter, Surname, Forename, Age, and Relationship to you (typically, “blood relative” or “direct ancestor”).  In my case, into the 1880 US Census, I entered Roll 575, Page 374A, Surname Barber, Forename Frank, Age 40, and Direct Descendant. (Note: I entered “Frank” as he was entered into the census and not “Franklin” as was his actual name.) Then, I entered a second person, Asa Roberts and all was well. Neither of them had any cousin matches, but that was okay. I knew I have lots more ancestors to enter.

After only two entries, I ran into MY problem. I realized, particularly in some of my Family Tree Maker corrupted source entries (see Review and Rant), but also, some of my early entries didn’t have all of the information that I should have entered. Sure, I had enough information to find the record again, Name, Place, and Census Year is sufficient to search and find most entries, but it wasn’t the right information to enter into Lost Cousins. So, I need to go back and clean up some of my Census Record citations. That’s okay; I should clean them up regardless. I  entered other direct ancestors into the system, but so far no matches to cousins.

The eight censuses that Lost Cousins uses are:

  • 1841 England & Wales
  • 1880 United States
  • 1881 Canada
  • 1881 England & Wales
  • 1881 Scotland
  • 1911 England & Wales
  • 1911 Ireland
  • 1940 United States

In the two I entered, I did the “Search for Cousins.” No matches.  I’m not surprised. With only two entries in the 1880 US Census, Lost Cousins suggests I only have a match potential of 0.06%.

There are two ways for me to increase the likelihood of finding a lost cousin. First, I need to enter more of my ancestors from any of the above censuses into their system. Second, more cousins need to register and enter their ancestors into the system. I can take care of the first item, but I need you to help out by you to fulfill the second item. So, if you aren’t registered with Lost Cousins, I encourage you to register. Maybe, we are lost cousins, but if you don’t register we may never know.

The process doesn’t take long, and there is a potential for a big hit. Consequently, I think it is time well spent. The process of adding ancestors brought to my attention the need for me to clean up some of the census citations in my records.  Sigh….

Note:  Lost Cousins also produces a newsletter that registered individuals may subscribe to. Past newsletters are searchable, so registration may not only provide leads on lost cousins but may also provide leads regarding other websites and resources.

Reminder to Self:

  • Never take shortcuts in source citations!

My Future Actions:

  • Clean up my sources for the 1880 US Census, the 1881 England & Wales Census, and the 1881 Canadian Census.
  • Enter remaining ancestors with 1880 or 1881 census entries into Lost Cousins.

———- DISCLAIMER ———-

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