Donna Darling Collection – Part 18

Also, The Ancestor Hunt and Old Fulton Postcards

Treasure Chest Thursday

By Don Taylor

For this week’s Treasure Chest Tuesday, I’m looking at three clippings from the Donna Darling Collection. One as an ad for her playing at the Binghamton Theater, next is an article which mentions Donna playing at the Binghamton Theater, and finally is a playbill showing Donna Darling and Boys playing January 26, 27, and 28 at the Binghamton Theater. I have cropped and resized the photos for the web.

Ad showing Donna Darling & Boys

Ad – Binghamton Theater – Donna Darling and Boys.

Key features:

  • The venue is the Binghamton Theater.
  • The show is Donna Darling and Boys in “Oh! Boy, Don’t Miss This One!
  • The date was January 26, 27, 28, 1922.
  • This was a new venue and date for a Donna Darling show for me.

Analysis

This was a clear event, but I wondered, what other information might there be for this show at this location. I went to my favorite newspaper site, The Ancestor Hunt to see what I could find. I searched for Binghamton and found several entries. The New York Online Historical Newspapers Summary looked like a great starting place. I did a <Command-F> to do a find and searched for Binghamton. There were seven entries. Three under “Old Fulton New York Postcards.”  One of those was the Binghamton Press from 1904 to 1969. None of the other entries covered 1922.

At the bottom of the Ancestor Hunt Summary page are links to four paid sites, Ancestry, Genealogy Bank, Newspapers, and Newspaper Archive. None of which provided additional newspapers in Binghamton during the time period I was interested in.

I went to the Old Fulton New York Post Cards site and did a search for the exact phrase, “Donna Darling and Boys” – Success. There were 10 results and two were from Binghamton papers. I added them to my collection.

I then looked at the other articles identified on Old Fulton Postcards. They provided information that Donna Darling and Boys played at

  • February 1922 at The Majestic Theater in Elmira, NY.
  • December 1922 at The Majestic Theater in Paterson, NJ.
  • September 1923 at Layfayette Theater in Buffalo, NY.
  • February, 1924 at The Majestic Theater in Hornell, NY

This was really great for a couple reasons. First, the Donna Darling Collection has many clippings for the Majestic that aren’t identified as to date or location. By matching those Majestic clippings to these articles looking for the exact play bill, I may be able to identify those clippings exactly.

Second, all four of these dates and venues were new to my list and will provide additional research opportunities.

Thanks again to The Ancestor Hunt and to Old Fulton New York Post Cards for being there. Both are great resources.

Actions

I’ve added all five venues and dates to my listing of shows and will research and write about them in the future.

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Sometimes the Census Taker is Wrong & Andrew Martin Darling

Sometimes the Census Taker is Wrong

By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.I’ve been having many roadblocks in my Abner Darling (1780-1839) research. Enough so that I decided to take a step back and look at Abner Darling’s descendants much more closely. The first of these that I am examining is Andrew M Darling, the oldest brother of Rufus Holton Darling (1816-1857). Rufus left New York for Kalamazoo, Michigan about 1844. Andrew left New York in the 1840s also and settled in Utica, Wisconsin. Then about 1859 Andrew moved west again, this time to Alexandria, Minnesota. Andrew died in 1864. I looked and looked and looked and couldn’t find Andrew in the 1860 census.  Finally, I searched for everyone named Andrew in Douglas County, Minnesota. There I found an Andrew Martin, whose apparent wife was Antoinette, and three children, Sarah, Olive, and Abram who matched the ages of Andrew Darling’s Wife Antoinette, and three children, Sarah, Olive, and Abner. I have little doubt that I found the family. Now my suspicion is that Martin was Andrew’s middle name, the “M.” I’ve known about for quite some time. The census taker just got the name wrong, a simple mistake. The Darlings were new in the area and the census taker probably didn’t know them yet.

Howell-Darling 2017 Research

List of Grandparents

Grandfather: Robert Harry Darling (1907-1969)
1st Great-grandfather: Rufus Harry Darling (1857-1917)
2nd Great-grandfather: Rufus Holton Darling (1816-1857)
2nd Great-grand Uncle: Andrew M. [Martin?] Darling (1805-1864)

 

Andrew Martin Darling (1805-1864)

Andrew M. Darling was born in 1805 or 1806 in New York, probably on the Beekman Patent in Dutchess County to Abner and Sally Ann (Munsell) Darling.

SOS Online BackupAndrew grew up with 7 siblings. They were

  • Diadema Darling
  • Sally Ann Darling
  • Abner Darling
  • Rufus Holton Darling(1816-1857)
  • Henry W Darling
  • Hannah Darling
  • Franklin C Darling

Abner moved his family west, first to Paris, Oneida County, New York (before 1820) and again to Clarkson, Monroe County, New York.

Sometime before 1835 Andrew moved west, apparently by himself, to Medina, Ohio. There he married Esther Antoinette Doolittle on October 8th, 1835 in a ceremony performed by Joel Goodell, a Minister of the Gospel. Andrew and Antoinette appear to have had four children.

Children of Andrew M. Darling and Esther Antoinette Doolittle

Child Name Born Married Death
Sarah Antoinette Darling c. 1844 1863 – James Dicken 1901
Alice Darling c. 1846 Before 1860
Abner M Darling 1851 Ella [LNU]* Unknown
Olive Blanche Darling 1854 c. 1869 – George McQuillen 1902

I have not found Andrew in the 1840 Census. All four of the children above were born in Wisconsin, so it is clear that Andrew and Antoinette located to Utica, Winnebago County, Wisconsin before 1844.

The 1850 Census shows a three generation household. With Andrew is his wife, Antonette and their daughters, Sarah and Alice.  This census record provides the only mention of Alice that I have found. Also living with Andrew is his mother, Sally A [Munsell] Darling, and his two youngest siblings, 25-year-old Hannah and 22-year-old Franklin.

The 1855 Wisconsin Census shows the family still in Utica, WI with a household consisting of 3 males. (Most likely Andrew, his son Abner, and his brother Franklin.) The household also has four females. (Most likely Esther Antoinette, Sarah, and Olive. Additionally, either Alice was still alive in 1855 and Hannah moved on, or Alice had died by 1855 and Hannah was still there. Further research is needed to discern what occurred.

Map showing Darling Homestead

Part of Douglan County, MN – Click map to see larger image

The family moved west again, this time, in 1859, to Douglas County, Minnesota. The 1860 Census shows the family with the surname “Martin.” Clearly a mistake.  Living with Andrew is his wife, 44-year-old Antoinette; his 16-year-old daughter, Sarah; his twelve-year-old daughter, Olive; and his eight-year-old son, Abner (listed as Abram).

It appears that Andrew died in September 1864 in Phelps County, Missouri. However, his family continued to prosper in Douglas County. He was said to have been an “exceptionally successful farmer.[i]” His wife Antoinette received a patent in 1873 for 149.1 acres of land they settled on the south shore of Lake Darling (near Alexandria, Minnesota)[ii]. Lake Darling was named for Andrew Darling[iii].

Further Actions / Follow-up

  • Determine if the three males in the 1855 Wisconsin Census includes Andrew’s brother Franklin or if there is an unknown child of Andrew.
  • Determine if the four females in the 1855 Wisconsin Census includes Alice or if the 4th female is Hannah. Was Alice was still alive in 1855 and Hannah moved on, or Alice had died by 1855 and Hannah was still there.

Sources

  • 1850 Census (FS), 1850 Census – A M Darling – Utica, Winnebago, Wisconsin. “United States Census, 1850,” database with images, Family Search – 12 April 2016), Am Darling, Utica, Winnebago, Wisconsin, United States; citing family 1092, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.). https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4DT-3L6.
  • 1855 WI Census, Family Search, 1855 – A. M. Darling – Utica, Winnebago, Wisconsin. “Wisconsin State Census, 1855,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MMM5-5DV 14 November 2014), A. M. Darling, Utica, Winnebago, Wisconsin; citing line 12, State Historical Society, Madison; FHL microfilm 1,032,689.
  • 1860 Census, Family Search, 1860 – Andrew M Martin [Darling] – Alexandria, Douglas, Minnesota. “United States Census, 1860”, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4LG-PBH – 26 July 2017), Andrew M Martin, 1860.
  • Martin, William Albert, and Lou Ella Johnson Martin, Dennis Darling: of Braintree and Mendon and some of his descendants 1662-1800 – Page 461.
  • Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013 , Family Search, Andrews Darling & Antoinett Doolittle – Marriage. “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” database with images, FamilySearch  27 September 2017, Andrews M. Darling and Antoineth Doolittle, 08 Oct 1835; citing Medina, Ohio, United States, reference 132; county courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 423,817. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XZ5X-M24.
  • Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013 , Family Search, Andrews Darling & Antoinette Doolittle – Intended Marriage. “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” database with images, FamilySearch ( : 27 September 2017), Andrews W. Darling and Antoinett Doolittle, 25 Sep 1835; citing Medina, Ohio, United States, reference 83; county courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 423,817. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XZ5X-GTR.
  • Wisconsin, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1820-1890, Ancestry, WI 1855 State Census Index – A. M. Darling – No Image Winnebago County, Utica Township, 1855

 Endnotes & Additional Sources

[i] Upham, Warren (1920). Minnesota Geographic Names: Their Origin and Historic Significance. Minnesota Historical Society. p. 180.

[ii] Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior, Accession MN0950.303 – Darling, Antoinette 11/15/1873. https://glorecords.blm.gov/details/patent/default.aspx?accession=MN0950__.303&docClass=STA&sid=swuujfdu.p5v.

[iii] Upham, Warren (1920). Minnesota Geographic Names: Their Origin and Historic Significance. Minnesota Historical Society. p. 180.

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Mitochondrial DNA and Minerva Ann (Tolliver) Mannin

By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.One of the great controversies in my genealogical efforts is in my Brown/Manning ancestors and relates to the parentage of Minerva Ann (Tolliver) Mannin. I know quite a bit about Minerva. She was born in Carter County, Kentucky in 1821. She married Enoch Mannin on October 15, 1843. Her husband Enoch led a group of 9 families (including her) to move to Minnesota in September 1882. At first, Enoch and Minerva settled in Stearns County but relocated to Cass County about 1888. Minerva died in May Township, Cass County, Minnesota on 24 Oct 1902.

I wrote about Minerva and her life in 2014 (See: Minerva Ann Tolliver (1821-1902)). The controversy revolves around her be Native American. Many researchers believe she was Native American. Indeed, she might have been, but I don’t think so. One bit of evidence is that she was never identified as “Indian” in any of the census records nor any other document I have seen. The other is that neither my mother nor my aunt have any segments that indicate a Native American lineage.  Surprisingly, both have segments on their X chromosome that indicate Sub-Saharan African. Their matching X-chromosome would have come from their common father, Richard. He would have received his X-chromosome as a recombinant X from his mother, Mary Elizabeth (Manning) Brown. She would have received one of her X-chromosomes as a replica of her father’s (John William Manning) X-chromosome. And he would have received his X as a recombinant X from his mother, Minerva Ann (Toliver) Mannin. It is also interesting to note that the percentage of Sub-Saharan African DNA on my mother’s and my aunt’s test results is consistent with the percentage of DNA that I would expect to be Sub-Saharan African if Minerva were 50% black. I wrote about this, also in 2014 in an article, “DNA, the X Chromosome & Minerva Tolliver Manning.”

It may be that mitochondrial DNA may be the answer.  Your mitochondrial DNA came from your mother, who got hers from her mother, who got hers from her mother and so forth. If a female line descendant of Minerva were tested and the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) showed ancestry from North America/Asia that would be convincing evidence that Minerva was Native American.  If the results showed ancestry from sub-Saharan Africa, that would be compelling evidence that Minerva was of African Descent.  If a mtDNA descendant were of European ancestry, we’d have no joy and have nothing to prove one way or another.

I would love to have a mtDNA descendant of Minerva take a mtDNA test and learn of the results. If you are such a descendant, please contact me.

Minerva Ann Tolliver had five daughters. The following chart shows the female descendants that I know about.  I know it is not complete, so If you have information that connects you to any of these individuals that information would help me further understand this family line. Minerva’s daughters were:

  1. Nancy Ann Mannin. Nancy married Jessie Monroe Barnett and had five daughters
    1. Frances M Barnett (1870-?) – I have no further information.
    2. Emma Nettie Barnett (1874-?) – I have no further information.
    3. Flarra Belle Barnett Flarra married George Wesley Horn and had two daughters.
      1. Helen Elvira Horn. Helen married Harold Anderson – I have no further information
      2. Dorothy Ellen Horn. No Issue.
    4. Sarah A Barnett (1883-?) – I have no further information.
    5. Sadie Barnett – I have no further information.
  2. Sarah Jane Mannin. Sarah married Joseph Hatfield Bryant and had four daughters
    1. Nancy Ellen Bryant. Nancy married John M Horn and had one daughter (that I know about).
      1. Mary A Horn (1903-?)
    2. Alice May Bryant. Alice married Sherman Morgan and Charles Lemmon and had three daughters
      1. Della Morgan
      2. Esther Lemmon
      3. Mary Etta Lemmon
    3. Hattie Ellen Bryant. Hattie married William Berry and had one known daughter.
      1. Dawn (Harvey) Berry
    4. Clara K Bryant. Clara married Oscar Harvey and had three known children.
      1. Evelyn Harvey
      2. Lois Harvey
      3. Dawn Harvey (Could this be the same Dawn as Hattie’s child?)
    5. Adella Mamie Bryant. Adella married Elmer Boaz Knowles They had five daughters.
      1. Elsie Lillian Knowles. Essie married Vernon Smalley – No further information.
      2. Alice May Knowles – No further information
      3. Clara Lavina Knowles – Married Luther Elbert Parker. They had two daughters that I know of. Both of them appear to be living.
        1. Daughter 1 Living
        2. Daughter 2 Living
      4. Lorraine Grace Knowles – Married Richard Markham Taylor. They had three daughters. Two of them appear to be Living.
        1. Daughter 1 Living
        2. Evelyn Joyce Taylor (1937-1984)
        3. Daughter 3 Living
      5. Bessie Katherine Knowles. Bessie married Albert Dickerman. They appear to have had one daughter
        1. Lillian Katherine (Dickerman) Breyer 1942-1990.
  3. Mary Ermaine Mannin – Married George Washington Gates in 1899 – No further information.
  4. Gresella Mannin (1856-1897) – No further Information.
  5. Prudence Mannin – Prudence married Frank P Bare – No further information.

Although this chart only shows female descendants that I know about. If you are male and your mother or your mother’s mother is any of these individuals, you too carry the mtDNA of Minerva. If you have information that connects you to any of these individuals, I would love to receive that information to help make my records more accurate.

Once again, if you are a descendant of Minerva (Tolliver) Mannin and carry her mtDNA, I am extremely interested in hearing from you. Please use the form below.  Thank you.

My public tree is on Ancestry.Com. Please see it for further details on this tree.

Further Action

  • Expand upon the Lorraine Grace Knowles & Richard Markham Taylor family unit and contact any mtDNA testing candidates.
  • Expand upon the Bessie Katherine Knowles & Albert Dickerman family unit and contact any mtDNA testing candidates.
  • Further research the descendants of Nancy Ann Mannin.
  • Further research the descendants of Sarah Jane Mannin.
  • Further research the descendants of Mary Ermaine Mannin.
  • Further research the descendants of Gresella Mannin.
  • Further research the descendants of Prudence Mannin.
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Elizabeth Hall Elementary – 6th Grade

Schools I’ve Attended

My Life
Those Places Thursday
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.My mother married Budgar (Edgar J. Matson) on 8 December 1961 in Webster, South Dakota. We celebrated the following Christmas at the Spring Lake Park house. I remember Budgar’s two daughters from his previous marriage being there. They received a bunch of Barbie stuff. It might be when things started to become difficult between Budgar and myself.  He made me play a board game, “Barbie Queen of the Prom,” with his two daughters, Janna and Heidi.  I was not amused.

Shortly after Christmas, we moved from the small house on Monroe Street in Spring Lake Park to a much larger home in North Minneapolis.  We rented the upstairs of a fairly large duplex at 1502 Fremont Avenue North. Fremont was a very busy street.  It was a multi-lane one-way street that commuters used to go into the city in the morning. The owners of the house lived downstairs and we rented the upstairs.

Photo of tront of 1502 Fremont Ave N, Minneapolis

1502 Fremont – Front

I have no photos of the house from the time we lived there; however, in 2013 I visited the neighborhood and took a couple photos of the house. The house, built in 1900, has fared well over the years and it looks better now than it did in 1962. I’m pretty sure we moved in there the first few days of January 1962.

It was a very rough part of town. I had lived in the country and in the suburbs before that and Fremont Ave. was my first experience living in the inner city. The three and a half block walk to school was dangerous. There were kids that would beat you up and take your lunch money. Some would beat you up just because they could. I quickly learned to take a route to school that avoided the Franklin Junior High kids, who were the older kids most likely to beat you up. It wasn’t too bad in the dead of winter, but as the year warmed up the likelihood of being accosted on your way to school increased exponentially. Not much could be done; parents in those days didn’t drive their kids to school. Besides which, Budgar thought it built character to be beaten up occasionally.

Elizabeth L. Hall Elementary

Photo of Elizabeth L. Hall Elementary c. 1960

Elizabeth L. Hall Elementary (from the back) circa 1960. (This was the view I saw when walking to school.) Photo Courtesy: Minneapolis Public Schools.

Elizabeth L. Hall Elementary was built in 1960 as a K-6 school. There were ten classrooms, a kindergarten area, lunchroom, and gymnasium. It was a four block walk to school and I had to cross Emerson, a fast running one-way heading North that carried much of the commuting traffic. If I remember correctly, my teacher’s name was Mr. Malmburg. He was the first male teacher I had in school. He did an excellent job of keeping control of the class. I think the school worked hard at developing the social skills of the students rather than focusing on academic skills. About a week before the end of the school year, Mr. Malmburg left the school for a job in Germany. A substitute came in for the final week and the class went utterly out of control, especially the last couple days. On the last day of school, and for us sixth-graders the last day of elementary school, many of us boys were so disruptive that we spent our last couple hours in the assistant principal’s office. My mother had to leave work and come to school to take custody of me and my report card. The school detained me because I jammed a screwdriver into an electrical outlet blowing a breaker thus plunging several classrooms into darkness. I have no doubt we would have been suspended if it wasn’t our last day.  That poor substitute teacher.  I feel sorry for her today. She probably never wanted to come back to Elizabeth Hall school ever again. I didn’t either.

An addition of another six classrooms was added the following year, in 1963. Today, Elizabeth Hall is a “magnet school” supporting K-5. According to Trulia and Realtor, it is graded as a 1 on the scale of 1 to 10. Its academics don’t seem to have improved much.

That summer, we moved again, about a mile away to Bryant Ave. so, I begin Junior High School at Jordan JHS, which is another story.

Sources

Internet: Minneapolis Public Schools History // Schools and Facilities // Elementary Schools // Elementary Schools D – H // Hall // Planning for the Future

Image Source: Internet: Minneapolis Public Schools History // Schools and Facilities // Elementary Schools // Elementary Schools D – H // Hall // Slideshow

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The name is different but the same.

Darling/Huber/Trumpi Line
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.The mother of great-grand uncle Ernest Lorraine Trumpy [Trümpi] has long been a question. His father, Bernard Trümpi has long been known, but his mother has been something of a mystery. You see, family oral history said that Bernard’s first wife’s name was Bertha, and his second wife’s name was also named Bertha. And to great-grandmother Bertha Barbara Trumpi I had ascribed the surname of Koch to the mother of Bertha Barbara (Trumpi) Huber and “unknown” as the surname for her step-mother, Bertha.

Detail of Ernest Trumpi’s death certificate

Then, cousin Carl sent me a copy of the death certificate of Ernest L. Trumpy. It showed the name of his mother as Bertha Cook. The informant was Ernest’s sister, so I was confident she would know Ernest’s mother’s surname.  My initial thought was, “Wow – I finally have the names.”  Bertha Barbara’s (the oldest child in the family) mother was Bertha Koch and Ernest’s (the youngest child in the family) mother was Bertha Cook. Got it.

Something was niggling at me though.  Maybe it was my subconscious, maybe it was intuition, in any event I decided to look up “Cook” in Google Translate.  Sure enough, it came back, “cook” in English is “Koch” in German. The same name was just translated by Frieda. That tells me that Bertha Barbara’s mother’s surname is unknown and her stepmother’s surname is Koch/Cook, not the other way around.

Thanks to cousin Carl I have a better idea of the family relationships.

List of Grandparents

  • 1st Great-grandmother: Bertha Barbara Trumpi [Trümpi]
    • 2nd Great-grandfather: Bernard Trümpi
    • 2nd Great-grandmother: Bertha [Trümpi]
      • 2nd Step great-grandmother: Bertha Koch/Cook
  • Great Grand Uncle Ernest Lorraine Trumpy [Trumpi] (Bertha Barbara’s brother)

Sources:

Indiana Death Certificates (Illinois State Board of Health), Indiana Death Certificate – Ernest L Trumpy.

 

 

 

 

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Abner Darling in the 1800 Census.

Darling Line
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.I’ve felt pretty solid that Abner Darling (b. 1780)’s father was Abner Darling (b. 1747). A little less so that his father was Ebenezer. On the other side of the tree, I am confident that Benjamin and Mehitable Darling had a son, Ebenezer.[i] But I’m not so confident that Ebenezer, the father of Abner, is the same person as Ebenezer, the son of Benjamin and Mehitable. This relationship is one of those times where I don’t know what is wrong, but something just doesn’t feel right.

Again, I’m confident that 24.  Rufus Holton Darling’s (1816-1857) father is #48.  Abner Darling (b. 1780-1839). And I’m convinced that 192. Ebenezer Darling (1718-1790) and 193. Mary Hakes had a son #96 Abner Darling (1747-c. 1800).Where I’m not confident is that Abner Darling’s (b. 1780-1839) father was 96. Abner Darling (1747-c. 1800) and not another Abner Darling.  That probably sounds confusing, and it is, but the bottom line is I need to go back and do more research on Abner Darling  (1780-1839) and confirm everything and make sure the connection between #48 and #96 is correct.

As I began researching, the first thing I noticed is that it was not my Abner Darling who lived Whitestown, Oneida County, New York during the 1800 Census[ii] and died sometime after that.  That record indicated:

Abner Darling  —  3  1  0  1  0  ||  2  0  0  1  0

The adults fit with what I think is the family unit at that time, but none of the children fit. My Abner’s children were born between 1779 and 1789 so none of them would be under 10 in the 1800 census.

Searching further, I found a Hannah Darling who was the head of a household in Bethlehem, Albany County, New York in the 1800 Census.[iii] In census records before 1850, I try to ascribe all of the family members to census record entries and see if it makes sense. If something is inconsistent, I seek a likely scenario that would make the record fit. In this case:

Detail of 1800 Census Record for Hannah Darling

1800 Census – Hannah Darling – — 0  1  3  1  0  ||  0 1 3  0  1

Males

Under 10            0
10-16                1          Alanson, Age 13.
16-26                3          Thomas, 25; Abner, 20; Reid, 17
26-45                1          First name unknown Darling, Age 28.
Over 45’ –           0

Note: The first boy named Thomas died in 1776.

Females

Under 10            0
10-16                1          Hannah or Deidame, ages 11 and 13. One is missing.
16-26                3          Luana, Age 15, Lucinda, Age 15, Esther, 22.
26-45                0
Over 45’            1          Hannah, Age 53

Hannah and her children line up very nicely to this 1800 Census record.

Sylvia age 27, Lucy age 29, and Mary age 30 all appear to be missing in this record as I would expect. I will need to follow their marriage information or death information to confirm this.

That Luana and Lucinda were identified as being 16 when they were only 15 is easy for me to accept. I believe this is the correct family unit. For Hannah to have been enumerated in the 1800 census as the head of household, her husband Abner must have passed (or vanished) before the enumeration date of 4 August 1800. That shifts my death date for Abner from after 4 Aug 1800 to before 4 Aug 1800.

I suspect that either Hannah, the younger, or Deidame had died before 1800 leaving only one daughter in the 10 to 16 age range.

Future Actions:

  • Find record for Abner’s death between 1790 and 1800.
  • Find a record for Hannah’s death, marriage, or census enumeration from 1800 to 1810.
  • Trace what happened to Abner & Hannah’s other children.

Endnotes/Sources

[i] Massachusetts Births and Christenings, 1639-1915, Family Search, Ebenezer Darling – 1718. “Massachusetts Births and Christenings, 1639-1915,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F458-7ZZ; 4 December 2014), Ebenezer Darling, 25 Aug 1718; citing Mendon, Worcester, Massachusetts, 56; FHL microfilm 855,377. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F458-7ZZ.

[ii] “United States Census, 1800,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XH5Y-F7Z; accessed 3 November 2017), Abner Darling, Whitestown, Oneida, New York, United States; citing p. 172, NARA microfilm publication M32, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 23; FHL microfilm 193,711.

[iii] “United States Census, 1800,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHRC-RQF; accessed 5 November 2017), Hannah Darling, Bethlehem, Albany, New York, United States; citing p. 107, NARA microfilm publication M32, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 22; FHL microfilm 193,710.

 

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Ancestor Bio – Dennis F. Murphy (c. 1845-1890)

By Don Taylor

Born of Irish immigrants, Dennis Murphy had a rough childhood. He enlisted and went to war at a young age. He returned from the war and worked.  He married at about 40 years old, had three children, two of whom died as children. He died at age 45 leaving a wife and a four-year-old daughter.

Whitten Project 2017 – Ancestor #10

List of Grandparents

  • Grandmother: Francis Florence Murphy
  • 1st Great-grandfather: Dennis F. Murphy
  • 2nd Great-grandfather: John Murphy

Dennis F. Murphy (c. 1845-1890)

Dennis Murphy was born sometime in 1845 or 1846 in Calais, Washington County, Maine. His father was John Murphy, an immigrant from Ireland. His mother is not clear. The 1850 Census indicates that John married Joanna Murphy within the year. So, it is not clear if John was a widower or if he and Joanna were together before that and married later.

Childhood

Photo of State School for Boys, South Portland, ca. 1920

The State Reform School in Cape Elizabeth was first built in 1850. In 1898, part of Cape Elizabeth became part of South Portland. This photo is circa 1920 after it became the State School for Boys. in South Portland. The photo is courtesy of the Maine Historical Society via the Maine Memory Network.

Shortly after his birth, the young family moved to Biddeford, Maine, and his sister Mary was born in 1850.

Certainly, Dennis’ childhood was difficult.  The 1860 Census finds the family split up.  Dennis’ parents are living in Biddeford as is his sister, Mary. He, however, is at the State Reform School in Cape Elizabeth for larceny. His age is given as 13, a year younger than the 1850 Census suggests.

 

Military

In 1861, when he was 16 years-old, he enlisted in in the 5th Maine Volunteer Infantry, First Regiment, Company A.  He indicated that he was 18 years-old at the time.  The 5-foot, 4½-inch young man was described as having a florid complexion, blue eyes, and dark hair.  His was a three-year enlistment. Although he enlisted in Biddeford, he mustered in two days later in Augusta, Maine, 72 miles away.

During his three years with the Fifth, he would have seen action at Bull RunSouth Mountain, Antietam, FredericksburgChancellorsvilleMaryes Heights, Salem Heights, Banks’ Ford, Gettysburg, Hagerstown, Mine Run, North Anna, TotopotomoyCold Harbor, Petersburg and many other skirmishes before he was transferred to the 6th Maine Infantry on 23 June 1864. Today the 5th Maine Volunteer Infantry’s memory is preserved at the Fifth Maine Regiment Community Center on Peaks Island, Maine.

In September 1864, he was transferred to the 1st Regiment of the Maine Veteran Infantry. There he would have participated at the Battle of Cedar Creek. He was honorably discharged on 6 December 1864.

Adulthood

The 1870 Census finds the 24-year-old Dennis living with his father, mother, and sister in Biddeford. He and his father both work in a machine shop.

The 1880 Census still finds Dennis living with his father and mother in Biddeford. He and his father are both machinists. None of the family can read or write.

Marriage

Dennis married Margaret Alice Maloney (possibly Mahoney) probably sometime in 1885. They had three children:

Name Born Marriage Death
Frances Florence Murphy 11 Apr 1886 1911 – Herbert Winfield Whitten 1952
John Walter Murphy 20 Aug 1887 n/a 22 Aug 1887
Joanna Josephine Murphy 28 May 1890 n/a Before 1900

Dennis was living on Gooch Street when his son, John Walter Murphy, died in 1887 at the age of two days. It is not clear when Joanna died, but certainly before 1900.

The Biddeford directory of 1890 indicates that Dennis is a machinist at the Saco Water Power Machine Shop and lived at 51 Gooch Street.

On 7 July 1890, Dennis applied for a military pension.

Death

Marker – Dennis F Murphy – Photo by Steve (#46835300) via Find a Grave.

Dennis F. Murphy died at 45 years of age on November 18, 1890. Dennis was buried at Saint Mary’s Cemetery, Biddeford, York County, Maine.

Further Actions / Follow-up

  • Visit the Fifth Maine Regiment Community Center at 45 Seashore Avenue on Peaks Island, Maine and learn more about the service of Dennis F. Murphy and the actions of the Fifth Maine Volunteer Infantry.
  • Visit McArthur Library and review the Murphy’s in the Biddeford Directories.
  • Order Margaret Murphy’s Pension Application #499,630 from the National Archives ($80). It should also contain the information from Dennis Pension application also.

Sources

  • 1850 Census, Family Search, 1850 Census – John Murphy – Biddeford, York, Maine. “United States Census, 1850,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M6VD-8Q6 : 12 April 2016), Dennis Murphey in household of John Murphey, Biddeford, York, Maine, United States; citing family 1066, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • 1860 Census, Family Search, Dennis Murphy – Cape Elizabeth, Cumberland, Maine [See Page 4 of images – Key] Page 82  (State Reform School) – Line 34″ United States Census, 1860″, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MDHY-13V : 26 July 2017), Dennis Murphy, 1860.
  • 1870 Census, 1870 Census – John Murphy – Biddeford, York, Maine. “United States Census, 1870,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M6DH-DKR : 12 April 2016), John Murphy, Maine, United States; citing p. 94, family 646, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 552,063.
  • 1880 Census (A), John Murphy – Biddeford, York, Maine. com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1880 United States Federal Census[database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2010. 1880 U.S. Census Index provided by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints © Copyright 1999 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. All use is subject to the limited use license and other terms and conditions applicable to this site. Original data: Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. (NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.
  • 1900 Census (A), com, Margaret Murphy. Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.
  • Biddeford, Maine Directory, 1890-1891, com, Dennis F Murphy – No Image. Original data: Biddeford, ME, 1890. W. A. Greenouch & Co., 1890.
  • Find a Grave, Dennis F Murphy – Memorial 151088087. Find a Grave Memorial Created by Steve – Record added: Aug 22, 2015, Find A Grave Memorial# 151088087. https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=151088087.
  • Maine, Marriage Records, 1713-1937, com, Herbert Winfield Whitten & Francis Florence Murphy. Maine State Archives; Augusta, Maine, USA; 1908-1922 Vital Records; Roll #: 60. http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=MaineMarriageRe&h=1028162&indiv=try.
  • Maine, State Archive Collections, 1718-1957, Family Search, Dennis Murphy – Military Service. “Maine, State Archive Collections, 1718-1957,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:246V-9LL : 4 December 2014), Dennis Murphy, 20 Nov 1861; citing Military Service, State Archives, Augusta.
  • United States Civil War and Later Pension Index, 1861-1917, Family Search, Dennis F. Murphy – Pension App. 794,293; Cert. 518,106. “The United States Civil War and Later Pension Index, 1861-1917”, database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N4J6-M44 : 24 March 2016), Dennis F. Murphy, 1890.
  • Maine, Birth Records, 1715-1922, com, Francis Florence Murphy. Maine State Archives; Cultural Building.
  • Maine, Birth Records, 1715-1922, com, John Walter Murphy – Aug 20, 1887. Maine State Archives; Cultural Building, 84 State House Station, Augusta, ME 04333-0084; Pre 1892 Delayed Returns; Roll Number: 79.
  • Biddeford Daily Journal ((Biddeford, ME), ), Newspaper Archives, 1887-08-23 – Page 3, Column 1 – Biddeford & Saco. https://newspaperarchive.com/biddeford-daily-journal-aug-23-1887-p-3/.
  • Maine, Birth Records, 1715-1922, com, Johanna Josephine Murphy – 28 May 1890. Maine State Archives; Cultural Building, 84 State House Station, Augusta, ME 04333-0084; Pre 1892 Delayed Returns; Roll Number: 79.
  • Wikipedia: “5th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/5th_Maine_Volunteer_Infantry_Regiment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Death of a Child Provides Clue to Grandparents.

Whitten Project
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.One of the most difficult “brick walls” I see is when several people about the same age are living in the same place. I had been struggling with Dennis Murphy, who was married to Margaret (or Marguerite) Maloney and lived in Biddeford, Maine. Dennis and Margaret were probably married sometime about 1885 because their first child was born on 11 April 1886. They had three children, two of whom died before the 1900 Census. Margaret is listed as a widow in the 1900 Census, so it appeared that Dennis died before 1900. Also, their youngest child was born on 28 May 1890, so it is reasonable to suggest that Dennis died after August 1889.

I could find birth records for the three children. A marriage record for the daughter indicated that Dennis was born in Calais, Maine, but none of the records I could find provided Dennis’ date of birth. I could not find any facts regarding this Dennis that would differentiate him from the other Dennis Murphys. I decided to try and follow the two children who had died and see if a newspaper might have carried the story. I got excited when I found that NewspaperArchives.com had “The Biddeford Journal” and was saddened that the issues available online contained many issues from 1888 but then they jumped to 1920. I searched anyway looking for Dennis Murphy, Dennis F Murphy, and lots of other combinations. Then success. The August 23, 1887, issue of the “Biddeford Daily Journal,” page 3, Column 2 had an article for Biddeford and Saco news.  It has a one line article: “A five day-old son of Dennis F. Murphy, of Gooch street, died last night.” His middle child, John Walter Murphy was born on 20 Aug 1887. If he died on 22 August, he would have been two-days-old instead of five-days-old, but sure looks like the right child – On Gooch street – Hummm…

Image of The Saco and Petlee Machine Shop c. 1910, Biddeford , Maine

Saco and Petlee Machine Shop c. 1910.
The Saco Water Power Machine Shop later became the Saco and Pettee Machine Shop, and finally the Saco-Lowell Machine Shop.
Photo courtesy McArthur Public Library via Maine Historical Society.

The 1890 Biddeford, Maine, city directory shows Dennis F. Murphy working at The Saco Water Power Machine Shop and living at 51 Gooch St.

Looking again at the 1880 Census and focusing on Biddeford, I quickly found a John Murphy, with wife Joana and son, Dennis, living at the “rear of Gooch Street.” And the names fit as well.  Dennis named his son “John” and one of his daughters “Joanna,” apparently to honor his parents. Dennis was also born in Maine and his parents were born in Ireland.

I’m confident that the Dennis Murphy who lived on Gooch street in Biddeford is the correct ancestor.  I am also convinced that Dennis’ father was John Murphy and his mother was Joana. The 1880 Census also indicates that there were two households living in the same dwelling. Besides John & Family, there was a Jeramiah McIntire with his wife Susan. They were in their 70s and could easily be related.  Could these people be Joana’s parents? I will find out when I research John and Susan’s lives.

Follow-up

Continue researching Dennis Murphy’s life.


Sources:

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Ancestor Bio – Nimrod Lister (c. 1826-c. 1890)

Roberts Line
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.I always feel frustrated when I am unable to find an ancestor in all of the census records. Such is the case with Nimrod Lister.  I found him in the 1860, 1870, and 1880 Census records but have been unable to find him in the 1830, 1840, or 1850 Census Records.  I also feel frustrated when I can’t find a source for death information on an individual. The 1900 Census indicates that his wife, Malinda, was a widow. The questions that arises in my mind: Was she actually a widow? Did she say she was a widow after Nimrod ran off for one reason or another?  Unfortunately, the 1890 Census is largely missing and searches of available online newspapers and other sources have been unsuccessful in my finding him after the 1880 Census.

Research Family 2017 – Ancestor #96

List of Grandparents

  • Grandmother: Essie Pansy Barnes (1903-1982)
  • 1st Great-grandmother: Marada Mae Lister (1867-1932)
  • 2nd Great-grandfather: Nimrod Lister (c. 1826-c. 1890)
  • 3rd Great-grandfather: William Lister (c. 1802- ? )

Nimrod Lister (c. 1826-c. 1890)

It is not clear when Nimrod was born. The 1860 Census indicates he was 34 years old; the 1870 Census indicates he was 43 years old and the 1880 Census indicates he was 55 years old. Suggesting he was born sometime between 1824 and 1827. I have settled on 1826 as my preferred date because it is most consistent with the earlier censuses. It appears that he was born in Pickaway County, Ohio. His father possibly was William Lister and the name of his mother is still unknown.

Childhood

Other researchers indicate that he had at least three younger siblings, Sarah, William, and James. I have not been able to confirm that information.  Also, I have not been successful in identifying him in the 1830, 1840, or 1850 Censuses. I hope to determine his earlier life better when I research William Lister.

Marriage

Nimrod married Malinda Evans on 17 March 1854 in Pickaway County, Ohio, in a ceremony performed by James Roland, a minister of the Gospel.[i] Nimrod and Malinda had eight children.

Name Born Married Died
James M Lister Bet. 1853-1855, Ohio
Nancy A Lister Bet. 1855-1857, Ohio
Charles C Lister Bet. Nov 1859-Jan 1860 Mary Compton – 1882
Eliza J Lister May 1862 Albert Hopewell – 1896
Mary Charlotte Lister Bet. 02 Jun-26 Nov 1865 Joseph E Crooks – 1882
Marada Alice Lister[ii] 27 Feb 1867 Joel C. Barnes – 1893 03 May 1932
William Lemuel Lister 15 Aug 1869 Laura Robertson – 1892 20 Oct 1935
Sarah F Lister Abt. 1872 William Correll – 1892

In the 1900 Census, Malinda indicates that she had eight children, seven of whom were living, so either James, Nancy, Charles, Eliza, Mary, or Sarah died before 1900 but the other children were still living.

Adult

Nimrod and Malinda moved from Ohio to Sullivan County, Indiana in the fall of 1859. Thomas Wolfe mentions that in his book, A History of Sullivan County, Indiana.[iii] Additionally, their son Charles was born in Sullivan County. Other records indicate he was born sometime between November 1859 and January 1860.

The 1860 Census finds the family in Indiana, Turman Township, Sulivan County, using the Graysville Post Office.  The family consisted of Nimrod and Malinda with their three oldest children, James, Nancy, and Charles. Nimrod is a farm laborer and six-year-old James was attending school.  The census records their surname as Lustre.[iv]

The 1870 Census finds the family still in Turman Township with seven of their children. Nimrod was a Farmer and owned real estate valued at $660.  Malinda was keeping house. James both worked on a farm and attended school. Nancy, Charles, and Eliza were attending school while Charlotte, Marandy and William were too young to attend school.[v]

The 1880 Census again finds Nimrod and Melinda. Nimrod is a Farmer, and Melinda is keeping house. Twenty-five-year-old James is a Huxter. Meranda, William, and Sarah are at home and attending school.[vi]

Death

Melinda (Evans) Lister is widowed before the 1900 Census. So, I believe that Nimrod died sometime between 1880 and 1900. I use circa 1890 as his death date as it fits between 1880 and 1900. I have not been successful in finding his death date nor his burial location.

Further Actions / Follow-up

  • Further Research Nimrod’s birth.
  • Research Nimrod’s early life through researching his parents.
  • Research Nimrod’s later life through researching his children.

ENDNOTES

[i] Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013, Family Search, Nimrod Lister & Malinda Evans. Pickaway, Marriage Records 1839-1855 Vol 4, Page 282. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XZ28-JL9.

[ii] 1880 Census (FS), Nimrod Lister – Indiana, Sullivan, Gill Township, ED 329, Page 5, Line 18. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MHSF-ZKC.

[iii] Wolfe, Thomas J., History of Sullivan County, Indiana, A, Files (Personal), Pages 234-236. A history of Sullivan County, Indiana, closing of the first century’s history of the county, and showing the growth of its people, institutions, industries and wealth. New York: The Lewis Pub. Co.

[iv] 1860 Census (FS) (NARA), Family Search, 1860 Census – Nimrod Lustre [Lister] – Turman Township, Sullivan, Indiana – Page 140, Line 36. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4NV-DFM.

[v] 1870 Census (FS) (NARA), Family Search, 1870 – Nimrod Lister – Indiana, Sullivan, Turman, Page 12, Line 24. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MX6Z-4N3.

[vi] 1880 Census (FS), Nimrod Lister – Indiana, Sullivan, Gill Township, ED 329, Page 5, Line 18. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MHSF-ZKC.

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Donna Montran – Metropolitan Opera House, Minneapolis, MN – 1 Feb 1920

Donna: “Best vocal offering of the performance”

Vaudeville – “Chin Chin”
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.We know that “Chin Chin” played at the Walker Theatre in Winnipeg on January 19-24, but I still haven’t determined where the show was from the 25th to the 31st.  That is a full week still unaccounted for.  It is likely that during that week the show played somewhere in the North Dakota or northern Minnesota.  In any event, the “Chin Chin” cast arrived in Minneapolis and opened on February 1st for a full week at the Metropolitan Opera House (aka Metropolitan Theatre).

The Minneapolis Sunday Tribune had a wonderful spread about the show in their “On Stage and Screen” section of the paper. There was a cute photo of the Quartet of Dancing Dolls from [the] “Chin Chin” Chorus as well as one of the better pre-show articles that I’ve seen. Donna was not part of this chorus but she is mentioned in the article.

 

Image of Minneapolis Sunday Tribune - On Stage and Screen - Chin Chin - 1 Feb 1920

Minneapolis Sunday Tribune – On Stage and Screen – Chin Chin – 1 Feb 1920

METROPOLITAN

CHARLES DILLINGHAM’S production of “Chin Chin,” a musical extravaganza of enduring popularity because of its delightful melodies, comes to the Metropolitan for the week, opening tonight. “Chin Chin” will be remembered as the last play in which the versatile Fred Stone and the late Dave Montgomery appeared as co-stars, a vehicle in which these comedians enjoyed a phenomenal success on Broadway and later on tour. In it they appeared together in Minneapolis for the last time in 1917.

Easily, the chief asset of “Chin Chin,” considered solely as a dramatic composition, is the excellent music which Ivan Caryell provided for the piece. There is practically no plot to the variegated performance, merely a string of incidents strung together on the thin thread of the idea of Aladdin and his wonderful, taken from old Arabian Nights tale. but the music is something to recall with genuine pleasure long after one has forgotten plot and principals. “Love Moon,” “Good-bye, Girls,” and “Ragtime Temple Bells” are airs which hold an irresistible appeal, which one hums over reminiscently, dances to and probably adds to his collection of favorite phonograph records to perpetuate. “Chin Chin” is blessed with perhaps the best music of any musical comedy which has appeared in many seasons.

Starting in a quaint Oriental toy bazaar, the action passes rapidly to a tea shop where a New Year’s celebration is in progress, on to a palace and winds up in a real circus. The pseudo-plot is built about the properties of a magical lamp which has the power to grant any wish of its possessor. A charming American girl and Aladdin, the young here, are in search of this lamp but encounter difficulties in the person of Abannbar, a wily Chinese villain who finally is ordered off the stage to permit the play to end happily.

Chin Hop Hi and Chin Hop Low, the slaves of the lamp, provide the chief fun of the piece. These will be played by Walter Wills and Roy Binder, two comedians who come well recommended for their drollery and clever dancing.

Other principals with this production are: Ethel Lawrence, Donna Montran,[i] Irene McKay, Carrie Dale, Nora Sieler, Neva Larry, Irene Burka, Victoria Burka, Louise Robinson, Starr Dunham, Joseph Robinson, English Orly, Richard Bosch, Edward Klement and George Phelps. There is also a large chorus of pretty girls.

Entertainments

Image of Minneapolis Sunday Tribune Article

Minneapolis Sunday Tribune (Minneapolis, MN),  Feb 2, 1920, Page 6

METROPOLITAN

Replete with the elaborate costuming and scenery that characterize a Dillingham production, “Chin Chin” opened a week’s engagement at the Metropolitan last night. It is the tuneful, rollicking, gloom-dispelling farce of other days when Fred Stone and the late Dave Montgomery utilized it as one of their most successful vehicles. Like many modern musical comedies, “Chin Chin” is unembarrassed by a plot, though this feature in no wise detracts from one’s enjoyment of the performance. It is merely a series of incidents strung together on the thread of the idea of Aladdin and his wonderful lame, the old Arabian Nights lame which as the magical property of granting, through it charming goddess and versatile slaves, the every wish of its possessor. Obviously, with a real villain included, and the magical lamp frequently changing hands, there are complications aplenty.

Walter Wills and Roy Binder are two ambitious, hard-working comedians who do not spare themselves in providing a wide variety of fun. They are clever dancers, sing together in an amusing manner, and Mr. Wills, especially, is a droll mimic of more than ordinary talents. While much of their comedy is patterned on that of Montgomery and Stone, they do not hesitate to introduce amusing innovations of their own conception, a fact which stamps their work with a certain individuality rather than as mere imitation of their predecessors in the roles. Mr. Wills’ facial contortions in singing and an adroitness in assuming ridiculous poses never fails to win appreciate applause. His eccentric dancing with Irene McKay is perhaps his best work.

Donna Montran is a stately “Goddess of the Lamp” who has a pleasing voice, her singing of “Violet” being the best vocal offering of the performance.[ii] Starr Dunham is an acceptable “Aladdin” and the “Abanazar” of Joseph Robinson pictures a real villain. Joseph Boyle and Arch Bennett supply good comedy as “Frisco” and the horse in the circus scene.

Tom Brown’s saxophone sextile won a generous share of last night’s applause and proved one of the best hosts of the present presentation of “Chin Chin.”

Owatonna?

This exact same article also appeared in the Daily People’s Press (Owatonna, MN) on February 8th. An accompanying photograph showed the “Girls in ‘Chin Chin.’” The photo and the article mention that the show begins next Monday evening, February 9th. Clearly, a mistaken article in the Press as “Chin Chin” was only scheduled be at the Metropolitan Theatre for the week. I haven’t determined where “Chin Chin” played from February 8th through February 11th, but it played at the Grand Theatre in Eau Claire, Wisconsin on February 12th.

The Metropolitan Theatre

Julius Cahn Theater Guide for 1913-1914 indicates the Metropolitan Theatre had a seating capacity of 1767 — 592 on the main floor, 675 in the balcony, and 500 in the Gallery.  The stage opening was large, 40×30 feet.[iii]

History of the Metropolitan Opera House

Image of the Metropolitan Theatre

Metropolitan Theatre – Image courtesy Chris1962 via Cinema Treasurers.Org

The Opera House opened on March 24, 1894, as the New People’s Theater. It was located at 320 First Avenue South in Minneapolis. First Avenue is now named Marquette Avenue. In 1898, the theater was renamed the Metropolitan Opera House by new owner Jacob Litt.  It operated as legitimate theater until the mid-1920s, when the theater turned to movies exclusively. In 1937, after only 43 years of operation, it was closed and demolished shortly afterward.

The former site of the Metropolitan Opera House is across Marquette Avenue from the Hennepin County Family Court building. The entire block was a large parking lot for many years. Today, the site is under construction and well on its way to being a new Opus Group 30-story multipurpose building, which will include luxury apartments, fine dining, and retail spaces. It is scheduled to open in August 2018 as 365 Nicollet Avenue. There is a fun-to-see time-lapse video of the building being built on the Opus Group website.[iv] 


Endnotes

[i] [Emphasis is mine.]
[ii] [Emphasis is mine.]
[iii] The Julius Cahn Gus Hill Theatrical Guide 1913-1914 – Page 327 – Metropolitan Opera House.
[iv] Internet: Opus Group – Work – Residential – 365 Nicollet Luxury Multifamily – Accessed 21 October 2017.

Additional Sources

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