Donna Darling Collection – Part 58

Orpheum Theatre – (August?) 1925 – Donna Darling’s Revue

Treasure Chest Thursday
By Don Taylor

For this week’s Treasure Chest Tuesday, I’m looking at a clipping from the Donna Darling Collection. I only found an ad and not an associated article.

display ad for Donna Darling's Review playing at the Orpheum TheatreOrpheum Theatre
Vaudeville Tonight | Friday | Saturday

Donna Darling’s Revue

See Dance of “Evolution” | The Charleston” | A Fast Colorful | Dancing Revue | Pretty Girls

PLENTY OF SINGING AND DANCING

Key features:

  • The venue is the Orpheum Theatre. There is no mention of date or location.
  • The show is “Donna Darling’s Revue.”
  • Also on bill
    • Meyers & Nolan – Comedy-Singing – The man with lots of avoirdupois
    • Tom Calloway – Comedian – In a Specialty Act | Full of Fun
    • Constance Talmadge in “Her Sister From Paris” on the Screen Tonight and Friday.

Analysis

The silent movie, “Her Sister from Paris” starring Constance Talmadge was released on August 2, 1925[i]. That fact is the only item that provides a potential date.

I searched at length[ii] for Donna playing at an Orpheum theater with Meyers & Nolan without success.

The known schedule that I have for Donna includes virtually no known venues for August 1925. She played in Buffalo, NY from July 27th to August 2nd. She also played in Oklahoma City from September 6th through the 9th. So, her playing at an Orpheum Theatre could be almost anywhere. (Cinematreasures.org indicates there are some 335 Orpheum Theaters in the United States.

Conclusion

(Probably August)  1925 – Unknown Location – Orpheum Theatre – Donna Darling’s Review (on stage with Meyers & Nolan and Tom Calloway). I’ll need to wait until more newspapers are digitized to determine when and where Donna played the Orpheum Theatre.

Endnotes:

[i] “List Of First National Pictures Films”. 2019. En.Wikipedia.Org. Accessed December 3 2019. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_First_N

[ii] My typical search of this type includes Newspapers.Com, Genealogy Bank, Newspaper Archives, Elephind, Don’t List, and Fulton Postcards.

———— DISCLAIMER ————

Ancestor Sketch – Emily S. Earle (1850-1926)

Bradley-Hingston Project
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.As I get to know an ancestor, it is my practice to look at an individual’s life in several passes. The first pass is, “Just the basics.” That is to say, determine the birth, marriage, and death of the individual. I expect to find the individual in each of the censuses during their lifetime.  As I do this first pass, I expect that I’ll learn many of the basic facts regarding the individual’s parents, siblings, spouses, and children. In most cases, I can find out all of these basic facts using Family Search and Ancestry alone. Occasionally, I’ll confirm a fact with another source, for example, an address not included in a census record which might be easily findable in a city directory. Additionally, I try to document any “odd” things that might need further research to understand.

Bradley/Earle – Ancestor #9

List of Grandparents

4.  Grandfather: Arthur Wilson Bradley(1887-1938)
9.  1st Great-grandmother: Emily S. Earle (1850-1926)
18.  2nd Great-grandfather: John H. Earle (1799-____)

Birth

Emma S. Earle was born on 6 June 1850 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She was possibly the tenth child of John H and Agnes (Cooper) Earle. John and Agnes had 11 children living with them over the years. I have not confirmed each of them, but I am reasonably sure of the relationships. Also, there were seven years between two of the children and another twelve-year gap between the last two, which suggests further research needs to be done on this family unit. Her father was a tailor; his shop was at 60 Walnut and they lived at 369 Cedar. Both parents were immigrants from England and all of the children were born in Pennsylvania.

The known siblings of Emily include:

Sibling Birth
Agnes 1825
Henry c. 1827
Ann c. 1828
John c. 1830
William c. 1832
Ellen Between 1839-1841
Catharine “Kate” c. 1842
Elizabeth c. 1843
Martha c. 1846
Emily S. 6 June 1850
Frances c. 1862

1850 Census

  • Although Emily was born after the official enumeration date for the 1850 Census, she was enumerated when the census taker visited on the 1st of August. The 1850 Census doesn’t provide for relationships between individuals in a household. In this census, it appears to be parents and 10 children from 25 years old down to Emily, aged “3/12.”
  • Twenty-three-year-old, Henry is an engraver, 20-year-old John is a carpenter, and 18-year-old William is also an engraver. Martha (12), Ellen (10), and Elizabeth (7) are all attending school.

1860 Census

  • Emily’s father, John H. Earle is still a tailor and his property is worth about $3,000. His personal property is worth about $600. Her mother, Agnes, is keeping house. Both her parents were born in England.
  • It appears that Emily’s (apparent) oldest sister, Agnes, and oldest brother, Henry, are no longer a part of the household. Thirty-year-old Ann (Annie) is still there as are William, Martha, Ellen, Kate (Catharine), and Elizabeth. Elizabeth and Emily are attending school.

1870 Census

The 1870 Census finds the family mostly intact. Ann, Martha, Emily, and Elizabeth are still in the household. There is another child, Frances, age 8, who appears to be a child of Agnes. It needs to be researched further to validate that as Agnes would have been 46 when Frances was born. It is possible that Frances has another relationship with the family that needs to be explored.

Finally, it appears that Kate (Catherine) married a “Becksby” and moved back to her parents with her two-year-old. That marriage, birth, and relationship needs confirmation.

Historically, shortly before Emily turned 21, Kaiser Wilhelm I and Otto von Bismark proclaimed the 2nd German Empire and Jesse James and his gang robbed the Obocock Bank in Corydon, Iowa.

Marriage

Emily married William C. Bradley on 6 June 1872 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The image relating to the marriage is available at a Family Search Affiliate Library. That image may tell us who married the couple and possibly infer their religion.

Ten months after their marriage, the first of their six children was born.

Child’s Birth Name Birth Date Death Date
William Earl Bradly 06 Apr 1873 27 Dec 1923*
David Cameron Bradley 17 Mar 1875 31 May 1913*
Marion Bradley 27 Nov 1877 05 Feb 1960
Walter Cooper Bradley Apr 1879 13 Feb 1913*
Emma Bradley 11 Jun 1885 Probably before 1900
Arthur Wilson Bradley 23 May 1887 05 Jan 1938

Sadly, Emily saw the deaths of four of her six children. A fifth child was admitted to a state hospital at the age of 25 and was an inmate until her death, 58 years later.

1880 Census

William and Emily did well for themselves The 1880 Census finds William and Emily living with four of their children on Prospect Avenue, in Philadelphia. William is a clerk and Emily is keeping house.  They also had two servants living with them. Seven-year-old William was attending school, but the other three were too young to have started school.

1900 Census

Sometime before 1900, the family moved to 608 North 17th Street. The current home at that location was built in 1925, so we can’t easily determine what the house was like in 1900. The family only had one servant but living with them was William’s sister Emma and Emily’s (Emma’s) sister Martha. William Bradley’s wife’s name was both Emma and Emily is evidenced by William and Emma(Emily) had been married for 28 years during the 1900 Census.

1901 – Death of William.

On August 6, 1901, Emily’s husband William died at home of a heart attack, “Angina Pectoris.” He was buried at Section H, Lot 251, at Woodland Cemetery, Philadelphia. Emily acted as executrix during his probate. The following year, Marion was committed to a state hospital.

1910 Census

By 1908, Emily had moved to 4073 Powelton Ave and is living there during the 1910 Census. Two of her sons, William & Arthur are living there. William is an Electrical Engineer for a Patent Attorney and Arthur is a linotype operator for the newspaper.  Emily’s sister-in-law Emma and her Daughter-in-law (Arthur’s wife) are living with her. Additionally, there is still one servant, Mary Rowan, an immigrant from Ireland.

1913

Nineteen Thirteen was a bad year. Her son David died at the age of 38 from Pneumonia and her son Walter committed suicide at the age of 33.

1920 Census

Sometime after 1913 and before the 1920 census, Emily moved from Philadelphia to 67 West Greenwood Ave., Lansdowne, Delaware County, Pennsylvania. Emily is living there with her 81-year-old sister Martha and her 69-year-old sister-in-law, Emma.

Deaths

Emily’s sister, Martha, died in 1922 and Emily died on April 3, 1926. She was buried with her husband William at Section H, Plot 251, at Woodlands Cemetery in Philadelphia.

Events by Location

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania – Birth, 1850, 1860, and 1870 censuses, marriage, 1880, 1900, and 1910 censuses.

Landsdowne, Pennsylvania (about 6 miles west of downtown Philadelphia) – 1920 census and death.

Further Actions / Follow-up

  • Determine the Church or Religion. Was Emily baptized or confirmed?
  • Confirm the relationship of Frances to John & Agnes.
  • Confirm the marriage of Catherine to a “Becksby” and the birth of her child.
  • Get a copy of the marriage record for Emily and William via an Affiliate Library.
  • Determine the death date of Emma Bradley (born 1885).
  • Learn about the reason for Marion’s hospitalization.
  • Review Emily’s death for probate.

————– Disclaimer  ————–

Continue reading “Ancestor Sketch – Emily S. Earle (1850-1926)”

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The use of these links will provide a small referral fee from FamilySearchDNA that I use to help pay for this website. For further information, disclaimer page. Thank you for your support of Don Taylor Genealogy.

I think I’ll get an mtDNA test for my wife – Don’t tell her though. It’s a Christmas present.

The Revolutionary Rose Family of Halifax County, North Carolina

Howell
by Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.One of my wife’s third great-grandmothers was Elizabeth (Rose) Vincent.

I have been unsuccessful in discovering a document that provides evidence for Elizabeth’s parents. Looking at other individual’s trees about 75% of other researchers suggest that her parents were William Rose (1759-1801) and Sarah Crawley (1752-1863).  Twenty percent suggest that Elizabeth’s parents were Elisha Rose Sr. (1753-1795) and Hannah Sellers (1758-1812). The final 5% suggest her parents were Elisha Rose and Pheroby Powell. A quick look at these other researcher’s trees failed to reveal a document that would provide evidence regarding Elizabeth’s parents. I’ll take a look at these possible parents for Elizabeth and try to determine what I believe to be correct. But first, I need to confirm what I think I know.

The 1850 Census finds Elizabeth Vincent as the 64-year-old head of household in Halifax, North Carolina. Living with her is her 25-year-old daughter, Nancy. Next door is John, one of her sons.

The 1840 Census shows Burkett Vincent as the head of the household. In the household is a female from 50 to 59 years old who I assume to be Elizabeth.

Likewise, the 1830 Census shows Burkett Vincent as the head of the household. In the household is a female aged 40 to 49 years old who I assume to be Elizabeth.

The 1820 Census Census shows “Perkit” (Burkett) Vincent as the head of the household consisting of a female age 45 and over. Elizabeth should have been about 34 years old, so I believe that Burkett had a first wife, who was the mother of his children enumerated in the 1820 Census.  This included

  • Two males under 10,
  • Two females under 10,
  • One female between 10 and 15 years old.

Other records indicate that Burkett had three boys born before 1920, William, John, and James.

That plus three previously unknown girls in the family suggest to me that Burkett had a first wife.

The Roses of Halifax County

The 1790 Census[i] All four reside in Edgecombe, Halifax, North Carolina.

  • Elisha Rose                 2 2 5-0-8
  • Wormley Rose           1-1-2-0-5
  • William Rose              1-2-3-0-6
  • Thomas Rose              1-1-2-0-0

The third number in the 1790 Census is, “Free white females including heads of families.” In 1790 Elizabeth Rose would have been about 4 years old. So, she would have fit into any of these four rose families.

During November 1786, Wormly Rose was charged with “begetting a baseborn child on the body of Francis Tyar.” Wormly was ordered to pay Francis the sum of 7 pounds “for the lying in expenses” and 5 pounds per year for the next 7 years.[ii]

Is it possible that this child was born in 1785 and was named Elizabeth?

The 1784 listing of Halifax County Taxables[iii] indicates there were 3 property owners with the Rose surname in Halifax County.

Name                          Acres

  • Elisha Rose                 230
  • Wm. Rose                   230
  • Wm. Rose Junr.          248

Next, it appears that the Rose family of Halifax County, North Carolina, was very involved with the Revolutionary War. There were at least seven involved according to

Revolutionary Pay Vouchers.[iv]

Name Date of Voucher DAR Connection
Amos Rose 23 Aug 1784 Not in DAR
Ann Rose 4 Sep 1781 Not in DAR
Elisha Rose 6 Oct 1785 Not in DAR
Samuel Rose 4 Sep 1781 Not in DAR
Samuel Rose 18 Sep 1781 Not in DAR
Samuel Rose Mar 1782 Not in DAR
Samuel Rose 18 Sep 1782 Not in DAR
Samuel Rose 4 Aug 1783 Not in DAR
Thomas Rose 16 June 1783 Not in DAR
William Rose 15 Feb 1781 A206765
William Rose 5 Oct 1781 A206187
William Rose 5 Oct 1781 Duplicate
William Rose 4 Aug 1783 Duplicate?

Whenever I see someone with a connection to the Revolutionary War, I immediately think of the Daughters of the American Revolution.  Searching the DAR Database for the surname “Rose” and North Carolina yielded nine matches.  Four of the matches related to four William Roses. Two of those had notes. Both indicated that the line couldn’t be used for DAR purposes due to problems in the line or with the service of the individual. That left two William Roses, one Junior and one Senior.

William Rose, Sr. DAR Ancestor #A206765

  • Birth Ante 1733
  • Death: Post 1785 – Halifax Co., North Carolina
  • CLARK, STATE RECS OF NC, VOL 15, PP 493, 664; PENSION OF ISAAC CARPENTER, *S8168; NC REV WAR PAY VOUCHERS ##180, 2506, #8424, ROLL #S.115.121
  • Service Description:    1) WAGON MASTER
  • 2) REIMBURSED FOR SERVICES RENDERED

William Rose, Jr. DAR Ancestor A206187

  • Birth Ante 1759
    Death Ante 2-13-1801 Warren Co. Georgia
  • Service Source: NC REV WAR PAY VOUCHERS #2507, ROLL #S.115.121
  • Service Description:    1) PAID FOR SERVICES RENDERED
  • 1st wife Sarah Crowley b. ____; d 2 June 1808 at Warren Co. GA

I was very surprised to not see the other five people I found in revolutionary pay vouchers not a patriot in the DAR database.

That said, the DAR Database gave me hints and suggestions regarding 13 individuals, some of whom were potential parents for Elizabeth. However, nothing in the DAR trees provided clear parentage for Elizabeth. From what I’ve found, her parents could still be any of the three suspected parental sets.

  • William Rose (1759-1801) and Sarah Crawley (1775-1863),
  • Elisha Rose Sr. (1753-1795) and Hannah Sellers (1758-1812), or
  • Elisha Rose and Pheroby Powell (died 1794).

Followup

Next time I’ll search for other aspects of the 18th Century Rose Family of Halifax County, North Carolina. Continue reading “The Revolutionary Rose Family of Halifax County, North Carolina”

S. F. Auto Death – 23 Dec 1919

Montrans in the News – S. F. Auto Death – December 23, 1919

Montran Monday
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.

 

This week’s entry for Montran Monday is from the Stockton Daily Evening Record (Stockton, CA) dated 23 December 1919.

 

              S. F. AUTO DEATH
                          —–
SAN FRANCISCO, Dec. 23.—One man was killed and four others suffered severe injuries in an automobile accident today near the Hunter’s Point dry dock. E. W. Montran, 45, was killed. Antone G. Garra and J. Mintus are seriously injured. W. W. Parker suffered a fractured skull and internal injuries.

The automobile skidded on a wet place in the street and overturned according to reports received by police. 

Discover you family history through historical newspapers at Newspapers.comNone of my records saw an E.W. Montran previously. So, I was able to add him to my records. E. W. Montran, born about 1874, died 23 Dec 1919 in San Francisco, California. A quick look at City Directories for San Francisco and Stockton for 1919 did not find any Montrans.

In the “California, Death Index, 1905-1939,” via Ancestry.Com, I learned that an Ernest W. Mottram died in San Francisco on 23 December 1919.

Further searches for E. W. Montran found one during the 1910 Census in Missouri and nothing after that. Additionally, the search for Ernest W. Mottram didn’t find anything of interest. So, I’m not sure if this is a Montran or a Mottram. Certainly, further, more in-depth, research should be considered for the future.


Source:

Stockton Daily Evening Record (Stockton, California) · Tue, Dec 23, 1919 · Page 2. “S. F. Auto Death” via Newspapers.Com.

Future Actions:

Determine if the person who died on 23 December 1919 in San Francisco, CA, was E. W. Montran or Ernest W. Mottram.

Endnotes:

[i] Montran Monday – My grandmother’s father was John Montran. She used the surname, as a young child and again when she began in show business. The name is uncommon and most of the Montrans I see in the newspapers are my grandmother during her early vaudeville career. However, with the constant flow of newly digitized material, I often learn of new articles which contain the Montran name. I pay attention to the finding and try to determine a possible relationship of any Montrans to Donna’s father, John Montran.