Ancestor Sketch – Emily Maples Hendricks Scott

Roberts-Scott-Hendricks
By Don Taylor

My research into Emily Hendricks was able to provide the names of her parents, Vaden Hendricks and his wife Sylvania Brown, whom I’ve added to my Roberts-Barnes tree. Now we know where 2nd great-grandfather, Samuel Vaden Scott, got his middle name. Tracing Emily through the 1850 and back to the 1840 Census records was a bit difficult (See Emily Hendricks in the 1840 & 1850 Censuses), but I made it through.

As is common with families at this time, the spelling of the surname is fluid. I prefer Hendricks; however, Hendrix is occasionally used. I typically use the surname as written in the record I am using/citing.

Roberts-Barnes – Ancestor #37

List of Grandparents

  • Grandfather: Bert Allen Roberts(1903-1949)
  • 1st Great-grandmother: Clora Dell ScottRoberts Adams (1883-1945)
  • 2nd Great-grandfather: Samuel Vaden Scott(1862-1931)
  • 3rd Great-grandmother: Emily Maples Hendricks (1836-1878)
  • 4th Great-grandfather: Vaden Hendricks (c. 1805-bef. Jun 1850)

Emily Maples Hendricks Scott (1836-1878)

Birth

TUBS [CC BY-SA 3.0)
Emily Maples Hendricks was born on 22 October 1836 in Kentucky. She was the second of four children of Vaden and Sylvania (Brown) Hendricks. Nineteen Thirty-Six was same year that Arkansas became a state and the Alamo fell in the siege of Mexican forces lead by General Antonio López de Santa Anna.

Childhood

She apparently had two older brothers. One, whose name is still unknown appears in the 1840 Census as a male aged 10 to 15. He doesn’t appear with the family in the 1850 Census and is presumed to have had a family of his own.

Her older brother, Willian, was about five years older than her.

Her first younger sister, Nancy, was born about 1839 in Kentucky.

About 1839 or 1840, the Hendricks family moved from Kentucky to St. Clair County, Illinois.

St. Clair County was growing by leaps and bounds. Between 1830 and 1840, the county nearly doubled in population.

1840

1840 Census – Baden Hendrix Household

<5 5-10 10-15 15-20 20-30 30-40 40 to >100
Males 1 1 1 All Blank
Females 2 1 All Blank

One more sister, Mary, was born in 1841, after the family moved to St Clair County, Illinois.[i]

1850

The 1850 Census suggests that her father has died or has abandoned the family. Her mother, Sylvania, is the only adult in the household in Washington Co., Illinois. Living with them are Emily’s two younger sisters and one of her older brothers, William.

Household                          Sex  Age  Birthplace
Sylvania Hendricks             F       42     Kentucky
William Hendricks              M      19     Kentucky
Emily Hendricks                  F        15     Kentucky
Nancy E Hendricks             F        11      Kentucky
Mary J Hendricks                F        9       Illinois

Marriage

I believe that Emily married William Hunt Scott on 12 September 1856 in Washington County, Illinois.

Children of William and Emily (Hendricks) Scott

Child Birthdate Birthplace (all Illinois)
Viola S Scott Feb or Mar 1860 Washington Co.
Samuel Vaden Scott 23 Aug 1863 Washington Co.
Francis Perry Scott 25 Mar 1870 St. Clair Co.
William Alonzo Scott 03 Oct 1871 St. Clair Co.

Adulthood

The 1860 Census shows William and Emily living in Washington County with “V” (Viola). Of interest is that above them on the census, (probably next door) are William’s parents, Samuel and Elizabeth and many of their children.

The 1870 Census shows William and Emily. The household consists of William, Emily, Viola, Sam, and Francis. I believe there is an error in that particular census as it reports Emily as being 23 (when she was 33).  Not a big error but noted.

Death & Burial

Find a Grave Marker

On October 27, 1878, Emily died in Franklin County, Illinois. She was buried at the Hammond Cemetery, Sesser, Franklin County, Illinois.

 

 

Events by Location

St. Clair County, Illinois Washington County, Illinois
  • Kentucky – 1936-1839 – Birth
  • Clair County, Illinois – 1840-c.1849– Residence
  • Clair County, Illinois – 1870-1878 – Birth of Francis Perry Scott, Residence, and William Alonzo Scott, death and burial.
  • Washington County, Illinois – 1850-1860 – Residence, Marriage to William Hunt Scott, Viola’s birth, and Samuel’s birth.

Further Actions / Follow-up

  • More Location-Historical Research

————–  Disclaimer  ————–



Sources

  • “United States Census, 1850,” database
with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M85-FL4 : 12 April 2016), Sylvania Hendricks, Washington county, Washington, Illinois, United States; citing family 1241, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • 1860 Census (NARA), 1860 – William H Scott (Wm K Scott). Year: 1860; Census Place: Township 3 S Range 4 W, Washington, Illinois; Roll: M653_235; Page: 942; Family History Library Film: 803235. https://search.ancestry.com/collections/7667/records/37930464.
  • “United States Census, 1870,”
(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M6WN­2W2 : 17 October 2014), Sam Scott in household of Willin Scott, Illinois, United States; citing p. 18, family 122, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 545,778.
  • Chris H. Baily, The Jehu Scott Family (Eustis, FL, Chris H. Baily), Files (Personal), Person 10 – William Hunt Scott. Bailey, Chris, “The Jehu Scott Family” accessed 7/16/16.
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com –  accessed 04 May 2019), memorial page for Emily M. Hendricks Scott (22 Oct 1836–27 Oct 1878), Find A Grave Memorial no. 80527356, citing Hammond Cemetery, Sesser, Franklin County, Illinois, USA; Maintained by Gravedigger49 (contributor 47282320).
  • “Illinois, County Marriages, 1810-1940,” database, FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KFKW-85D : 3 March 2016), Samuel V. Scott and Amanda J. Haley, 24 May 1879; citing Franklin, Illinois, United States, county offices, Illinois; FHL microfilm 1,005,307.
  • “Illinois, County Marriages, 1810-1940,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KFKW-26N : 5 November 2017), Patience Marshall in an entry for Francis P. Scott and Florence E. Roberts, 24 Mar 1901; citing Franklin, Illinois, United States, county offices, Illinois; FHL microfilm 1,005,307.

Endnotes

[i] Internet: Wikipedia – St. Clair County, Illinois, Demographics – Historical Population Table. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Clair_County,_Illinois#Demographics

Researching Ferdinand Lenz

Durand Project
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.In researching my (half) Aunt Barbara’s maternal line, I came to her great-grandfather Ferdinand J. Lenz.  I found that trying to sort her Ferdinand Lenz from the others was very difficult. There were three Ferdinand Lenz’s in the 1890s in Chicago. I believe one of them even married a Lena in 1869, so separating the Ferdinands is difficult. I decided to try to differentiate Barbara’s great-grandfather through his immigration and naturalization information.

What I think I know about Ferdinand Lenz:

The 1880 Census indicates Ferdinand and Lena lived in Effingham, Lucas County, Illinois.

The 1900 Census is very helpful. It indicates that Ferdinand was born in March of 1850 and that he and Lena have been married for 30 years. It also indicates he came to the United States in 1862, 38 years before and he had naturalized.

The 1910 Census indicates he came to the US in 1867 and was naturalized. Finally, Ferdinand’s death record indicates he was born on 12 Mar 1850 in Stargard, Germany.

Ferdinand Lenz

  • Born: 12 March 1850 in Germany
  • Immigrated: Between 1862 and 1867.
  • Naturalized: Before 1900.

I have not been successful finding Ferdinand in the 1870 Census.

Family Search

I searched Migration and Naturalization records for Ferdinand Lenz born about 1850 and who immigrated between 1862 and 1867.

Several candidates were eliminated for various reasons. There ended up with two potential candidates.

A Ferdinand Lenz naturalized on 17 Oct 1868, at the Supreme Court of New York County. This Ferdinand lived at 199 East 4th Street and was formerly Prussian.[i] After the Austro-Prussian War, much of what would later be called Germany was part of Prussia. So, this Ferdinand Lenz is a possible candidate. I should confirm that the Ferdinand Lenz who naturalized 17 Oct 1868, at the Supreme Court of New York County is or is not mine.

Next, there was a Ferdinand Lente who was born in Germany and naturalized on 10 May 1892 in the Circuit Court, Cook Co., Ill. Certificate No R-35 P-279 should show for certain. Unfortunately, this record is not available online, yet, and is available only at the Family History Library.  It is film:

Naturalizations, v. 34-35 1892
Film Number: 1024202
DGS Number: 7781542
Page Number: 279 (and associated)

Germans to America indicated three potential candidates, but all were eliminated from my consideration for various reasons.

Ancestry

A search of the records at Ancestry.Com only found the same records I found at Family Search. So, basically, I am at an impasse (brick wall). I have not been successful finding Ferdinand Lenz’s immigration or naturalization records for certain.

I have two tasks.

  1. Determine the best way to find a copy of a Naturalization Record from 1868 at the Supreme Court of New York County. Once determined, attempt to receive a copy of the record.
  2. Add to my “Tasks for the Family History Library” a task to review FHC Film 1024202, Page 279 for the record.

In the meantime, Ferdinand’s death record indicated his father was William Lenz. Next time I work on the Durand Project, I’ll attempt to do a surname study of Lenz in the Chicago area before 1900. Hopefully, I will be able to determine the siblings of Ferdinand and learn more about his parents.



ENDNOTES

[i] New York Naturalization Index (Soundex), 1792-1906,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QVTW-322L : 15 March 2018), Ferdinand Lenz, 1868; citing , New York, New York, United States, Index to Naturalization Petitions filed in Federal, state and local court in New York, 1792-1906, NARA microfilm publication M1674 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 150; FHL microfilm 1,420,416.

Donna Darling Collection – Part 47

Loew’s Theater, London, Ont & More

Treasure Chest Thursday
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.For this week’s Treasure Chest Tuesday, I’m looking at a page from the Donna Darling Collection. The page includes two photos, one ad for the Bijou, one non-descript ad, and two articles about Donna and Sammy playing at Lowe’s.

Lowe’s Theatre – “Seven Sinners”

The only item identified with a date is the clipping for Loew’s Theatre – “Seven Sinners”.  It indicates June 24, 25, 26 and “Ont.) IMDB indicates that the movie was released on 7 November 1925 in the USA. That would suggest the film played at Loew’s in June 1926.

Donna and Sammy played at the Capitol Theater in Kitchener on June 21, 22, & 23, so it fits that after Kitchener they went the 110km (68 miles) to London to play at the Loew’s Theatre there.

The first article reads:

LOEW’S THEATRE
“SEVEN SINNERS”

Dona Darling, former Zeifield Follies girl, heads an all-star vaudeville cast at Loew’s Theatre the last half of this week, and together with the famous crook story, “Seven Sinners,” as the feature picture, London theatregoers are treated to a perfectly balanced theatre bill. Mary Prevost makes a crook really too pleasant to be natural, and Clive Brook, the hero, is an excellent parallel.

The story is interesting in its novelty; everybody in it is a crook, but everybody manages to enlist the sympathies of the audience before the picture ends. The settinsg [sic] show careful choosing and the plot development is well worked out. The story consists of the efforts of seven crooks to steal jewels from a deserted mansion, and then, when the house is quarantined with them inside it, the owner returns. Situations develop which are in turn funny and tense, until, at the end, crooks are probed to be sometimes nearly human, after all.

The vaudeville bill is exceptionally fine. It is seldom that London audiences have the pleasure of seeing such smooth aerial performancers as the Aerial Smiths on the same bill as the act given by Dave Fox and Jane Allyn. This is a comedy skit of unusual merit entitled, “To Let.” The last act on the bill, the Darling and Clark Revue, has five very capable performers. The dancing in the first part is especially good.

The second clipping appears to have been clipped without the information about the motion picture.  The clipping says:

AT THE THEATERS

LOEW’S

The trapeze work of the vaudeville program is carried out by the Aerial Smiths. It is said of them that they have been a long time at it, and it can be said for them that they haven’t wasted their time. They make other acts of their kind look like the last rose of summer, especially when the climax is reached and the woman shoots out on a trapeze that suddenly lengthens as she swings in mid-air.

Fox and Allen entertain with songs and patter based upon an unsatisfactory search for an apartment in a big town. They seem to please and draw to themselves a generous amount of the applause.

The Darling and Clark Revue is not the kind that deals exclusively in dancing. It has that, too, but it also has other features equally as entertaining, including songs, whistling, a clever recitation and a darkened-stage novelty. The whole is permeated with the personality of Miss Darling, there are five persons.

The third item is a simple ad for Donna and Sammy and “Their New Revue.”  There is no theatre mentioned but it reminds us that Donna was “The Scintillating Beauty” and Sammy was the “Juvenile Komik.”

Next, are two photos that appear to shoe the entire cast of the Darling and Clark Revue. It looks like one photo was taken by Donna and includes Sammy as the third person from the left. The second one looks like it was taken by Sammy and has Donna as the third person from the left. I am quite certain the other three people in these photos are the other members of the show. I will need to do a little more research to determine what their names were.

The Darling & Clark Revue Cast – 1926  (Including Donna)

The Darling & Clark Revue Cast – 1926 (Including Sammy)

Finally, there is an ad for “Decatur’s Favorite – The Bijou”  It mentions three vaudeville acts: Donna Darling and Sammy Clare [sic] Revue “A Modern Vaudeville Frolic” Donna & Sammy’s show is playing with Paul & Darling “Two Broadway Rounders” and Billy De Armo doing a comedy novelty show. It wouldn’t be clear why this clipping would be on the same page with the Loew’s Theatre clippings unless you knew that Donna and Sammy played at the Bijou Theatre in Decatur, IL only eight days later.

Conclusion

I was able to add a new venue to Donna’s Career.  She and Sammy played June 24 to 26, 1924, in their “Darling and Clark Revue” at Loew’s Theatre in London, Ontario, Canada.

I was also able to add images I suspect are the three other performers in the show.

Finally, I was able to add another advertising clipping to Donna and Sammy’s show at the Bijou Theatre in Decatur, IL.

Actions

Research the other three individuals who play in the Darling and Clark Revue.

Sources

Donna Darling Collection – Image DSCN1428.

Donna Darling Collection – Part 44

The Lindo Theatre

Treasure Chest Thursday
By Don Taylor

For this week’s Treasure Chest Tuesday, I’m looking at two clippings from the Donna Darling Collection where she played at the Lindo Theater. The first is a newspaper clipping which advertises The Donna Darling Revue playing for 4 days at the Lido. at the same time as “The Savage” a comedy novelty movie. According to IMDB, the film was released on 18 July 1926. Sadly, the film is apparently lost, with no known copies left. From the ad, it looks like a really funky movie. “One wild man—many wild animals—a naughty dinosaur—and a society deb looking for a thrill. Oh, spare us—we can’t mention it without laughing.” It is hard to think of the film’s story without laughing. Ben Lyon went on to star in the 1930 version of “Hell’s Angels.” May McAvoy went on to be in “The Jazz Singer” with Al Jolson.

Clipping of Donna Darling & The Savage at the Lindo Theatre
Clipping – Donna Darling & The Savage at the Lindo Theatre

I had previously seen articles in Newspaper Archives and Newspapers.com indicating that the Donna Darling Review played at the Lindo Theatre in Freeport, IL on August 3, 1926. The clipping clarified the dates as being August 2nd through the 5th. Donna’s show was “One of those big acts that seldom gets to small towns” and “Missing this [show] is like losing one of life’s treats.”

A clipping of an ad of the Donna Darling Review playing at the Lindo Theatre
Ad showing the Donna Darling Review playing at the Lindo Theatre

I have cropped, edited, and sized the photos for the web.

Key features:

  • The venue is the Lindo Theatre.
  • The show is the “Donna Darling Revue.”
  • Also on the bill
    • Ben Lyon and May McAvoy in “The Savage”

Sources

Internet: IMDb – Entry for “The Savage” (1926) https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0017348/

 

The Scotts of St. Clair County, Illinois – 1840 Census

Census Sunday
Roberts-Scott

William Hunt Scott, my 3rd great-grandfather, was born about 1834 in St. Clair County, Illinois. I followed him back from his being the head of the household to the 1850 Census and living in the household of his father Samuel Kinkade Scott at Turkey Hill, St. Clair County.[i] The 1850 household looked like:

  • Samuel K Scott 41     Farmer – Real Estate Value 1600
  • Elizabeth Scott 30     Keeping House
  • William H Scott 16     Farming
  • Sarah Scott         14    Attending School
  • Mary Scott          11     Attending School
  • Francis P Scott  10     Attending School
  • Emily Scott          5      Attending School
  • Rachel Scott        1

This household has every appearance of being a traditional home with husband, wife, and six children. I hoped I could continue back to the 1840 Census. Would the Samuel Scott family include all the children and fit the model of a traditional family or might there be some other individuals in the household.

The 1840 Census[ii]

Samuel K Scott – St Clair, Illinois

MALES   |   FEMALES

– 1 – – – 1 |   2 – – – 1 –

MALES

  • 5-10         1      Presumed to be William Hunter (Born 1830-1835)
  • 30-40      1      Clearly the Head of Household – Samuel K Scott (Born 1800-1810)

FEMALES

  • < 5            2       Presumed to be Sarah and Mary – (Both born 1835-1840)
  • 20-30      1      Presumed to be Elizabeth (Born 1810-1820)

All entries are consistent with the 1850 Census.

Conclusion

William Hunt Scott and his two oldest sisters are clearly enumerated in the 1840 Census. William won’t be in the 1830 Census and his father, Samuel was only 21 years old in 1830, very possibly in the household of his father, John Scott. I am looking forward to researching this family line back to the revolution.


ENDNOTES

[i] 1850 Census (NARA), 1850 – Samuel K Scott. Year: 1850; Census Place: Turkey Hill, St Clair, Illinois; Roll: M432_126; Page: 359A; Image: 360. https://search.ancestry.com/collections/8054/records/16536816/.

[ii] 1840 Census (NARA), 1840 Census – Samuel Scott – St Clair, Illinois. “United States Census, 1840,” database with images, FamilySearch accessed: 15 August 2017), Samuel Scott, St Clair, Illinois, United States; citing p. 280, NARA microfilm publication M704, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 70; FHL microfilm 7,644. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHBJ-5WZ