Rachel Fugate – (1803-1870)

52 Ancestors – Week  2018-48 [i]
Brown – Manning – Fugate line
by Don Taylor

Finding that we have Fugate ancestors in Kentucky give rise to the question if our Fugates are related to the famous blue-blooded Fugate family of Troublesome Creek, Kentucky. I took some time looking at the family tree of the “Blue Bloods,” people with a recessive genetic trait called methemoglobinemia.” I did not find any common ancestors with our Fugates; possibly there is a relationship but, if so, it is distant.

Brown Research 2018 – Ancestor #105

List of Grandparents

  1. Grandfather: Clifford Brown| aka Richard Earl Durand | aka Richard Earl Brown
  2. Great-grandmother: Mary Elizabeth Manning(1878-1983)
  3.  2nd Great-grandfather: John William Manning, (1846-1888)
  4. 3rd Great-grandfather:  Enoch Mannin (1823-1907)
  5. 4th Great-grandmother: 05.  Rachel Fugate (1803-1870)

Rachel Fugate – (1803-1870)

Birth

Rachel Fugate was born on 4 June 1803 in Kentucky, 9 days after Ralph Waldo Emerson. Kentucky had been admitted to the Union just nine years earlier.  Her parents were Reuben and Mary Fugate.  Reuben Fugate was born in Wythe County Virginia, the birth location for Rachel’s mother, Mary, is unknown.

Childhood

Nothing is known specifically of Rachel’s childhood, but historically, Kentucky was undergoing great expansion. She undoubtedly felt the New Madrid earthquakes in 1811 & 1812 and probably knew people who fought in the War of 1812, although her siblings were too young to have served in that war.

Marriage

She and Meredith Mannin were married in Bath County, Kentucky on 14 Feb 1825 (possibly 17 Feb) in a ceremony performed by Johnathan Smith. She was 21 years old and Meredith was 22.

Rachel and Meredith had 12 known children.

ChildBirth YearSpouseDeath
Enoch1823*Minerva Ann Tolliver1907
Isaac B1825Elizabeth Fortune1905
Thomas Hillry1827Rachel R Richardson1924
Tubil1829Elizabeth Jane Brown1862**
Reuben Calloway1831Sarah A Shuts1859
Katharine Susan1833Harvey Tapp1864**
John1835Martha McGlothin1870
Mahala1837William MyersBef. 1917
Elizabeth Marthy1838(None)1841
Sarah Jane1838 or 39James Richardson1913
Zachariah1841Unknown if he married.1864**
Tarlton1844Mary Jane (Unknown)1916

* Enoch was born two years before Meredith and Rachel were married.
** Three of the children died during the time of the Civil War.[ii]

Rachel lived until May 1870, so it appears five of her children proceeded her in death.

Adult

About 1828 the Manning family moved west to Missouri. Tubil, Reuben, and Katherine were born there.

1830 Census

The 1830 Census indicates the family lived in St Ferdinand, St Louis, Missouri. The household consists of:

      3 Males under 5, One presumed to be Isaac, Age 5
                           One presumed to be Thomas Hillry, Age 3
                           One presumed to be Tubill, Age 1
            1 male 5 to 10       Presumed to be Enoch, Age 7
            1 male 20 to 30.    Meredith Mannin, Age 28.
            1 Female 20 to 30 Presumed to Be Rachel Fugate, Age 26.

About 1834 the family moved again, this time to Indiana. That is where John, Mahala, Sarah Jane, and Elizabeth were born.

1840 Census

1840 Census indicates the family is in Boone County, Indiana. The household consisted of:

2 Males 5 to under 10  – Presumed to be John (age 5) and Reuben Calloway, (Age 9)
            1 Male 10 to under 15 – Presumed to be Thomas Hillry OR Tubill (Age 13 or 10)[iii]
            2 Males 15 to under 20 – Presumed to be Enoch (Age 17) and Isaac B. (Age 15)
            1 Male 30 to under 40 – Presumed to be Meredith Mannin (Age 38)
            3 Females under 5 – Presumed to be Mahala (Age 2), Elizabeth  (Age 1), and Sarah Jane (a newborn)
            1 Female 5 to under 10 – Presumed to be Katharine Susan (Age 7)
            1 Female 30 to under 40 – Presumed to be Rachel Fugate Mannin (Age 36)

Sometime in 1840 or 1841, the family moved from Indiana to Kentucky, where Zachariah and Tarlton were born.

1850 Census

The 1850 Census indicates the family is in Carter County, Kentucky

Meradith Mannen – 48 – Farmer 250   VA
Rachel         “       47                                      KY
Tubal          “        20      Laborer                Mo
Reuben       “       17        Laborer                “
Cathrine S   “     15                                       “
John           “        13                                     Ind
Mahala        “      12                                     “
Sarah          “        10                                     “
Zachariah    “       8                                    Ky
Tarlton        “        6                                     “

The four oldest children, all boys, appear to have moved out of the house before 1850.

1860 Census

The 1860 Census indicates the family is in Bath County, Kentucky. Only four of their children are still at home with them:
Meredith Manning – 58 Farmer – Born Virginia
Rachel   “             57      Kentucky
Zachah   “            18      Farm Hand – KY
Mahala                21      KY (Apparent Error)
Sarah                   19      KY (Apparent Error)
Tarlton                16      KY

Death & Burial

Rachel died on 7 May 1870.

I have been unsuccessful finding burial information concerning Rachel. 

Further Actions / Follow-up

  • Zachariah died of smallpox during the civil war, and his father received his pension. Research the deaths of the other two children who died during the Civil War and determine if any of them served.
  • Determine if Rachel can be “found” in her parents’ records before her marriage to Meredith.

Sources

  • Mannin Family Bible, Copy, Mannin Family Bible – Family Records – Births. Bible Records found in Civil War record file of Zachariah Mannin, son of Meridith and Rachel Fugate Mannin. Zachariah died of smallpox Jan. 7, 1864 at Knoxville, Tennessee. Meridith Mannin applied for Zachariah’s pension and received it. I have found this resource in many locations including http://boards.rootsweb.com/surnames.mannin/159.1.1/mb.ashx.
  • 1830 Census (A) (NARA), Com, 1830 Census – Meredith Manning – St Ferdinand. St Louis County, Missouri.
  • 1840 Census (A) (NARA), Com, 1840 – Merradeth [Merediith] Mannon [Mannin] – Boone, Indiana; Roll: 74; Page: 138. Ancestry.com
  • 1850 Census, Com, 1850 – Meradith [Meridith] Mannen [Mannin] -b. 1802. 1850; Census Place: District 1, Carter, Kentucky; Roll: M432_195; Page: 248B; Image: 497.
  • 1860 Census, Family Search, 1860 – Meredith Manning – Bath, Maine – Page 131.
  • Kentucky, County Marriages, 1797-1954, Family Search; Meredith Mannon and Rachel Fugate, 14 Feb 1825 – Bond. Bath, Kentucky, United States, Madison County Courthouse, Richmond; FHL microfilm 273,003. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V5ZH-L12.
  • Kentucky, County Marriages, 1797-1954, Family Search; Meredith Mannon and Rachel Fugate, 14 Feb 1825 – Confirmation. Bath, Kentucky, United States, Madison County Courthouse, Richmond; FHL microfilm 273,007. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V5ZZ-J2T.
  • Minnesota Deaths and Burials, 1835-1990, Family Search, Enock Mannin. “Minnesota Deaths and Burials, 1835­1990,” database,
FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1 BLS : 10 March 2018), Enock Mannin, 07 Apr 1907; citing May, Cass, Minnesota, reference ; FHL microfilm 2,117,564. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FDM5-BLS.

Endnotes:

[i] In 2014, Amy Johnson Crow suggested a theme for bloggers to use of “52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks.” I have continued this theme into 2018.

[ii] Enoch served in the Civil War and all of his brothers were of the age to have served.

[iii] NOTE: The family should include both Thomas and Tubill, however, it appears that only one of the two boys was enumerated. 

Family Search entry for Rachel Fugate 
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Marriage of Meredith Mannin & Rachel Fugate

Amanuensis[i] Monday
Brown-Mannin(g) Line
By Don Taylor

Intro/source

As is so often the case, when you find a record it begs additional questions. Were Meredith and Rachel married on Valentine’s day or three days later?

Transcription [ii]

Bond for the Marriage of Meredith Mannon [Mannin] and Rachel Fugate
Know all men by these presents that we Meredith Mannon & Rueben Fugate are held and firmly bound unto the Commonwealth of Kentucky in the just and full sum of £50 current money of Kentucky which payment well and truly to be made to the said Commonwealth we bind ourselves our heirs & jointly and several firmly by these presents sealed and dated this 14th day of February 1875 the condition of the above obligation in such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended to be had and solemnized between the above bound Meredith Mannon and Rachel Fugate. Now should there be no lawful Occur to obstruct said intended marriage then this obligation will be void else to remain in full force and notice in law

Marriage Confirmation[iii]

Marriage Confirmation – Meredith Mannon [Mannin] and Rachel Fugate.
Memorandum of Marriages Confirmed by me in Bath County in year 1825.

Willis Moffett & Caroline Stone on the 4th of Jan
Also Rice Burns & Elizabeth Hardin Febr 3rd
Meredith Mannon & Rachel Fugate on the 14th Feb….
….

January the 3rd 1826 – Jonathan Smi…

Discussion

14th or 17th?

The legibility of the “Marriage Confirmed” date leaves something of a question.  It is unclear in my mind if the date is the 14th or the 17th. Both dates make sense. There are no other 7s on this page to compare his 7s against his 4s. Meredith and Rachel’s father, Reuben Fugate, signed a bond assuring Meredith and Rachel were able to marry. That they married on the same day makes sense, unless there was a waiting period. If Kentucky had a marriage waiting period in 1825 then their marriage three days later, on the 17th makes more sense.

Conclusion

I have decided to go with the 14th because Kentucky does not currently require a waiting period. I’ve tried to find Kentucky Laws in 1825, but have been unsuccessful. If anyone has a source for me to check, that would be a great help. If Kentucky had a waiting period in 1825, then Meredith and Rachel had to have been married on 17 February 1825.


Endnotes

[i] John Newmark started the “Amanuensis Monday” category in 2009 on his Blog,  Transylvanian Dutch, and many bloggers have followed suit using the tag. Google provides the following meaning for amanuensis: “A literary or artistic assistant, in particular, one who takes dictation or copies manuscripts.”

[ii] “Kentucky, County Marriages, 1797-1954,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V5ZH-L12 : accessed 16 September 2018), Meredith Mannon and Rachel Fugate, 14 Feb 1825; citing Bath, Kentucky, United States, Madison County Courthouse, Richmond; FHL microfilm 273,003.

[iii] “Kentucky, County Marriages, 1797-1954,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V5ZZ-J2T : accessed 16 September 2018), Meredith Mannon and Rachel Fugate, 14 Feb 1825; citing Bath, Kentucky, United States, Madison County Courthouse, Richmond; FHL microfilm 273,007.

Top 10 Surnames in my Roberts-Brown Research

Roberts-Brown-2017
Saturday Night Genealogy Fun
Surname Saturday
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.In a recent “Saturday Night Genealogy Fun,” Randy Seaver suggested we look at our surname list. My Roberts-Brown tree has 6,084 individuals. I manage the tree using Family Tree Maker 2017.  A Surname Report is available under person reports. Two clicks and the report is done is less than a second. The first click was to include all individuals in my file, not just the immediate family. The second click was to sort by surname count. It doesn’t provide a total of the number of unique surnames. But, again a couple clicks do it easily. A click on Share then select export to CSV.  The system asks where you want the report, you save it, then the system asks if you would like to open the Exported Report. I did and my computer launched Microsoft Excel. Entries are every other line. The last surname on the list was line 2801.  Subtract 3 for the three lines of header and divide 2798 by two and I learned I have 1,399 unique surnames in my tree.

I was surprised by the some of the results.

  Surname Count
1 Mannin 424
2 Roberts 243
3 Raidt 183
4 Brown 147
5 Krafve 120
6 Bryant 109
7 Warner 98
8 Wolcott 95
9 Unknown 75
10 Manning 70

Surprises

Raidt is the surname of my son’s maternal grandfather. I have done quite a bit of research on him, but I didn’t realize it was that extensive. For my Raidt research to be number 3 was quite a shock. I should, probably, break this research into a separate project.

Even more shocking was the Krafve surname.  Hildur Krafve was my step-grandmother and is the grandmother of two of my siblings. I didn’t think I researched that family much and was surprised that I have done so much research on that line. I have followed that family name through six generations. With all the children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and so on, there were many names. That it rated high makes sense, but I was still surprised.

I was also surprised by Wolcott. My 5th great-grandmother was Mary Wolcott Parsons.  I have tentatively followed her ancestry back seven more generations to my earliest known ancestor, back in the 1500s.  But still, I had no idea that I had that many known Wolcotts.

Not Surprised

Before I knew who my biological father was, I did a lot of research on the Roberts surname. I was looking for and following potential connections based upon Y-DNA results and other people’s trees. Most of these Roberts entries are not related to me in any meaningful way. That I have over 200 individuals with the Roberts surname didn’t surprise me.
Search Military Records - Fold3

My number one surname was Mannin and that my number 10 surname was Manning didn’t surprise me much. Mary Elizabeth Manning was my great-grandmother and I have done a lot of research in her ancestry. Her husband was Arthur Durrwood Brown. Seeing Brown, and the related surnames if Bryant and Warner, wasn’t much of a surprise either.

Sadly, my number 9 surname, “Unknown,” highlights mistakes in my tree. For a while I used “unknown” when I didn’t know an ancestor’s surname. For married women, whose maiden name don’t know, I’ve begun using their husband’s surname in brackets instead of “LNU” or “unknown.”  That gives me a better idea of where they fit in the tree without needing to see all the other details of the individual. That I have 75 individuals for whom I’ve entered their surname as “unknown” suggests that I need to so some cleanup.  Certainly, “unknown” could be the appropriate entry on occasion, but rarely is it the best entry. As an example, “Ann Laurie Unknown” doesn’t tell me as much as “Ann Laurie [Fannin].”  As long as I remain consistent, I think I’m okay using bracketed names in an unconventional manner.

Conclusion

I enjoy Randy Seaver’s Saturday Night suggestions. They make you think about your family tree in different ways.  In this case, looking at the surnames in this exercise reminded me that I need to be consistent in how I handle unknown surnames.

Keep Trees Wide, Not Deep – Example: Mannin/Barnett

Brown-Montran Research
DNA Research

Mannin/Manning/Brown

During the last meeting of the Maine Genealogical DNA Interest Group, someone asked if it is better to have a tree that is deep or a tree that is wide. I mentioned that, for autosomal DNA test matches, a wide tree is best.  The sheer number of potential 5th and 6th cousins is daunting. But, more importantly, the likelihood of your sharing DNA with a 4th cousin is only 69% and the likelihood of sharing DNA with a 5th cousin is only 30%.[i] Consequently, knowing your 10th great grandparents is of little use in matching DNA cousins.  (Consequently, knowing your 10th great grandparents is of little use in matching DNA cousins. There are two exceptions to this, Y-DNA tree (paternal only) is useful for connecting trees on a Y-DNA match.  Also, X-DNA can provide a similar usefulness.)

23 & Me Shared Matches
23 & Me: Shared Matches

The importance of having a wide tree was exemplified recently.  I was contacted through 23 and Me by a, potentially, 2nd to 4th cousin (I’ll call B.J.) I took a look at the match using 23 & Me‘s new She and my aunt Barbara shared 88cM across five segments. My mother shared 50cM across two segments; interestingly enough, I also shared 50cM across two segments. Looking at what segments all four of us share is an excellent example of how sticky DNA segments are.  All three of us shared the same sticky chunk of DNA.

Screen Shot - Chromosome 3 comparison
Screen Shot – 23 & Me – Chromosome 3 comparison showing sticky clump shared among all of us.

 

 

 

We exchanged basic tree information, she mentioned her ancestors were a Mannin and a Barnett. When she said that, I knew we were related and I was pretty sure I knew exactly how.  Nancy Ann Mannin married Jessie Monroe Barnett about 1867 in Kentucky. They later moved to Minnesota and settled May Township in Cass County, Minnesota.

A couple more email exchanges and I learned that B.J. and my Aunt Barbara were third cousins their common ancestor was Enoch Mannin. Enoch was one of those pivotal people in my genealogical research and I knew a lot about him and his descendants. I even had B.J.’s mother (but not her father nor her) in my family tree records.

Thanks to 23 and Me for providing the tools to connect with another cousin.

———-  DISCLAIMER  ———-

I have tested my mother, my aunt, and myself with 23 and Me – Have you?


Endnotes:

[i] Internet: DNA Land – “Face it: DNA cannot find all your relatives” https://medium.com/@dl1dl1/face-it-dna-cannot-find-all-your-relatives-f68089b8e1e9#.1yar6d4d6

My Male Ancestors – Birth, Death, and Age at Death

Brown/Montran Research
Roberts/Barnes Research

One of the reasons that I enjoy Randy Seaver’s blog, Genea-Musings is that he regularly makes me realize the missing branches I have in my tree leaves have lots more to do on my tree.  His recent “Saturday Night Genealogy Fun” asked folks to look at their tree and determine the age of death for their male ancestors. (He had done a similar thing for female ancestors the week before.)

Using Heredis, it is really simple to generate such a report. I clicked on myself, then clicked on Documents/Ancestor Report and the system generated the data. Then I went to Report Export, I selected Excel from several options.  After the information exported, the Excel spreadsheet opened automatically.

Because the ahnentafel numbers for the individuals are exported, it is easy to select just the male ancestors by deleting all of the odd numbers. I immediately saw that my 3rd great-grandfather, Enoch Mannin, lived the longest – 88 years. The ancestor who died the earliest was my great-grandfather Hugh Ellis Roberts, who died at an extremely young 24 years of age.

Next, I began seeing my gaps.  I have three people with a range of dates for their life.  For example, my great-grandfather John F. Montran was born sometime between 1860 and 1875 and died sometime before 1911. So, he could have died at 35 or died at 51 years or anywhere in between; I don’t know.

Then, I realized I have six ancestors for whom I have no death dates. More work.

Finally, I realized I have nine ancestors in the past five generations that I know nothing about.  No names, let alone birth or death dates. So, Randy’s challenge reminded me of how much more work I still have to do. But the good news is that I have 11 of my male ancestors identified as to their age at death. Even better, I have eight more this year than I would have had last year (all of my Roberts line.).  I even have one more than I would have had last week, So things are definitely looking up.

Chart of Male Ancestors, Dates of Birth and Death

Ahn. #
Surname
Birth Date
Death Date
Age at Death
Father
2
Hugh Eugene  Roberts
° 9/1926
† 27/3/1997
70
Grandfathers
4
Bert Allen  Roberts
° 7/9/1903
† 1/5/1949
45
6
Richard Earl  Brown
° 14/9/1903
† 19/1/1990
86
Great-Grandfathers
8
Hugh Ellis  Roberts
° 2/7/1884
† 30/8/1908
24
10
Joel Clinton Barnes
° 23/6/1857
† 30/6/1921
64
12
Arthur Durwood  Brown
° ~ 1864
† 27/8/1928
~ 64
14
John F  Montran
° <> 1860 & 1875
† < 1911
< 35
2nd Great-Grandfathers
16
Asa Ellis Roberts
° 28/2/1835
† 8/10/1887
52
18
Samuel Vaden Scott
° 1860
† 1931
71
20
Nelson Barnes
° 24/3/1816
† 21/2/1884
67
22
Nimrod Lister
° <> 1824 & 1827
† < 1909
< 82
24
William Henry Brown
° 1842
26
John William  Manning
° ~ 1845
† 25/4/1888
~ 43
28
Unknown (Montran)
30
Franklin E  Barber
° 10/1836
† 7/4/1917
80
Third Great-Grandfathers
32
John Calvin Roberts
° 3/3/1795
† 4/1873
78
34
Unknown Marshall
36
William H. Scott
38
Adrico J. Haley
40
Unknown (Barnes)
42
Unknown
44
Unknown (Lister)
46
Unknown
48
Barney Brown
° ~ 1814
† <> 1860 & 1870
<> 46 & 55
50
William M  Sanford
° ~ 1822
52
Enoch  Mannin
° 1819
† 7/4/1907
88
54
Unknown
56
Unknown (Montran)
58
Unknown
60
Unknown (Barber)
62
Stephen  Blackhurst
° ~ 1804
† 24/12/1869
~ 65
———-  DISCLAIMER  ———-