Beatrice Hennessey & the Censuses

Census Sunday
Halcro-Varone Project
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.Sometimes you run into things you’ve never encountered before. In my Halcro-Varone project, I discovered a name change that I found confusing. I knew Beatrice M Hennessey[i] married Vincenzo Varone on 23 October 1916. I thought, “Ah, easy; I’ll just follow her back and see where she lived before her marriage.

Comparison – 1900–1910 Censuses

I quickly found her in the 1910 census with her parents, but when I saw her in the 1900 census, I became confused. Could it be, she changed her first name as a child? I decided that using charts of the family would probably show the error of my ways.

Name 1900 Census
Age & Birthplace
1910 Census
Age & Birthplace
Head – John Hennessey 29 – Ireland 39 – Ireland
Wife – Margaret 29 – Ireland 39 – Ireland
Dau. – Bridget/Beatrice Bridget
age 7 – Rhode Island
Beatrice
age 16 – Rhode Island
Son – Joseph 4 – Rhode Island 14 – Rhode Island
Five other children
Ages 1 thru 9, all born in Rhode Island

The confusing thing was that Beatrice in the 1910 Census was Bridget in the 1900 Census. There was no change in address for the family; it was 236 Richmond Avenue in both censuses. My next thought was that the census taker in 1900 must have gotten the name wrong or transcribed it incorrectly. Then I found the birth registration for Bridget Mary Hennessey, daughter of John and Margaret (Prendergast[ii]) Hennessey. Bridget was born on 4 August 1894. In all of the records I’ve encountered, the child is Beatrice from the 1910 Census on and Bridget before the 1910 Census. I’ve just never encountered a name change like that before.

Beatrice appears to live with her husband and children in 1920, 1925 R.I., and 1930 Censuses. She seems to have separated from her husband about 1932. (Her husband, James Varone, began living with another woman, Albertina, about 1933.) In the 1940 Census, she appears as Beatrice Varone but as Beatrice Hennessey in records after 1940.

Conclusion

It appears Beatrice had severa names:

    • Bridget Hennessey 1894-1909
    • Beatrice Hennessey 1901-1916
    • Beatrice Varone 1916-1940
    • Beatrice Hennessey 1955-to her death?

When she switched back from Varone to Hennessey isn’t clear yet.


Sources:

“United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M97R-JSB: accessed 12 November 2021), John Hennesey, District 1 Providence city Ward 5, Providence, Rhode Island, United States; citing enumeration district (E.D.) 41, sheet 7B, family 146, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1972.); FHL microfilm 1,241,507.

“United States Census, 1910,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MP6L-L4X: accessed 10 November 2021), John Hennessy, Providence Ward 4, Providence, Rhode Island, United States; citing enumeration district (E.D.) ED 183, sheet 3A, family 48, NARA microfilm publication T624 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1982), roll 1442; FHL microfilm 1,375,455.


Endnotes:

[i] The surname Hennessey and Hennessy are used interchangeably in various records.

[ii] The surname Prendergast, Pendergast, and Penderghast are used interchangeably in various records.

Ethel Wight Collection – Part 56

Harkins(2), Harkinson, Harlow, Harriman, and née Phinney

Photo Friday
Ethel Wight Collection
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.This week, for Photo Friday, I identify the people in five more envelopes from the Ethel Wight Studio Collection[i]. The envelopes contain the names who paid for the photos, not necessarily of the individual portrayed in the image. As such, it is vital to analyze the pictures and information to identify the individual therein.[ii] Ultimately, my goal is to reunite the photos with family members who may have never seen the image.

Virginia Harkins, circa 1936

This negative envelope says, “Miss Virginia Harkins, 62 State St. #852.”

Why I believe this to be the individual.

  • Virginia Harkins, circa 1936

    The 1937 Portland City Directory lists Virginia Harkins, a student nurse at 62 State and residing at 52 State. Note that 62 State was the address for the State Street Hospital.

  • Virginia Harkins married Hugh Alton Curry in Andover, Victoria, New Brunswick, Canada, on 22 May 1937.
  • Virginia appears in the 1940 Portland City directory as a graduate nurse living at 112 Park. Hugh does not appear in the directory.
  • In the 1940 US Census, Virginia also appears as the 26-year-old head of household at 38 Franklin Terrace in South Portland. She is the night superintendent at a Hospital. Living with her is her 48-year-old mother, Virginia Parker. Both mother and daughter lived in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, in 1935.
  • The 1930 US Census lists both Virginia’s living in Chicago with the surname Harkins.
  • A photo of Virginia Eleanor Harkins in Ancestry Trees confirms this is the same young woman.

This photo is of Virginia Eleanor Harkins, the daughter of Michael John and Ida Minnie (Tibbetts) Harkins, born 19 March 1914 in Portland, Cumberland County, Maine

Virginia Eleanor Harkins is found in 11 trees at Ancestry. Family Search identifies Virginia Elenore Harkins as ID 9V73-X1F.

I have uploaded a photo of Virginia to her Family Search Memories. I also uploaded two additional photos to my Flickr photostream.

Morris Harkinson, circa 1935

This negative envelope says, “Mr. Morris Harkinson, 193 Congress St. #455.”

How I searched for this individual.

  • Morris Harkinson, circa 1935

    The 1935 Portland City Directory lists nine people living in ten apartments at 193 Congress Street. None of them is surnamed Harkinson nor with the first name of Morris.

  • Likewise, the 1936 Portland City Directory lists 11 people, none of whom have the first name of Morris or a surname of Harkinson. Also, there are no Harkinsons listed.
  • And the 1937 Portland list no one named Morris nor Harkinson at 193 Congress Street.

I am confident that the name listed on the envelope the negatives for these photos says Mr. Morris Harkinson. Also, this photo is of a man in his late 20s or early 30s who was transitory in Portland.

Alternative individuals:

In 1905 a Morrie Harkinson was living in Philadelphia with his (apparent) wife, Rachel. The Morris in the photo is much too young to have been married in 1905.

Other than the supposed name on the negative envelope, I could not identify this man, so I uploaded his photo to Dead Fred. I also uploaded one additional photo of him to my Flickr photostream.

Constance Harkins, circa 1936

This negative envelope says, “Mrs. Ethel Harkins, 150 Grafton St, #824 | Constance Harkins.”

Constance Harkins, circa 1936

Last week, in Ethel Wight Collection – Part 55, I looked at another photo for Ethel Harkins that would have been taken the same day as the photo of John Harkins.

According to Ancestry Family Trees, John had two sisters, Frances Evelyn Harkins, born 9 May 1928, and Constance A Harkins, born 10 October 1933. Additionally, the negative envelope has “Constance Harkins” written. So, this photo is her.

Five public trees on Ancestry list Constance A Harkins. Again, Constance Harkins does not have a Family Search profile, so I uploaded her photo to Dead Fred.

Jane Harlow (née Phinney), c. 1936

This negative envelope says, “Mrs. Jane Phinney Harlow, 100 Brentwood St. #641.”

Why I believe this to be the individual.

  • Jane Harlow (née Phinney), c. 1936

    The 1934 Portland City Directory list Mrs. Jane P Harlow residing at 100 Brentwood.

  • The 1940 US Census lists 52-year-old Jane Harlow living with her mother, Clara L Phinney, at 100 Brentwood. Jane is divorced

This photo is of Jane Harlow (Née Phinney) about 1936.

Jane Pinal Phinney is found in eight Ancestry trees. Family Search identifies Jane Pennell Phinney, daughter of Clara Luella (Pennell) Phinney, as ID LTDF-8WD.

I have uploaded two photos of Jane to her Family Search Memories. 

Stephanie Harriman, circa 1936

This negative envelope says, “Mrs. Merton Harriman, 407 Cumberland Ave. #886.”

Why I believe this to be the individual.

  • Stephanie Harriman, circa 1936

    The 1935 Portland City Directory lists Merton N Harriman, a painter living with his wife, Dorothy B, at 4 Mechanic.

  • The Maine Marriage Index indicates that Merton N Harriman and Dorothy B Foster were married on 16 April 1932. Both lived in Portland, Maine, before the marriage.
  • The 1940 US Census lists Merton N Harriman as a lodger, with 19 other lodgers at 223 High Street. The New York-born 27 year old is divorced.
  • The 1940 US Census lists Dorothy Harriman, living in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, with her 58-year-old mother (Ella Foster) and her two children, Stephanie, age seven, and Garry, age two. Dorothy, Stephanie, and Ella lived in Lewiston, Maine om 1935.
  • Stephanie Harriman was born in Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, on 10 December 1932.

Garry is too young to be the person in this photo. Based upon the number (#886), the photo was likely taken about 1936 when Stephanie was about three years old.

Two public trees at Ancestry refer to Stephanie Harriman, daughter of Dorothy Bell Foster. Family Search does not appear to have a profile for Stephanie.

At first, I was concerned the photos I had for Stephanie were of two different children; however, the child is wearing the same skirt and tights in both sets of images; only the addition of a sweater changes the child’s appearance.

I added one of her photos to Dead Fred and the other to my Flickr Photostream.

Confirmed to be Stephanie Harriman by a half-brother.


Conclusion

  • I identified two individuals with Family Search profiles, so I posted their photos to Family Search
  • I identified two other individuals that do not have Family Search profiles, so I posted their photos to Dead Fred.
  • Other than a supposed name, I failed to identify one individual; consequently, his photo to Dead Fred.

For all of the Ethel Wight Collection analysis, please see here.

Final Note

If any of these photos are of your family member, I would love to hear your reaction. Especially if this photo is of a loved one for whom you hadn’t seen this photograph before.


Endnotes

[i] The Wight Studio was in Portland, Maine. Many thanks to Ethel Wight’s family for access to and permission to use the collection of their great aunt.

[ii] These images were converted to positives using a lightbox, a Nikon camera and computer software.

Donna 100 Years ago – The Stroud – Stroudsburg, PA

A Great Thanksgiving Program.

100 Years Ago
Donna Montran & Co.
Vaudeville
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.“Donna 100 years ago” is my reporting events relating to my grandmother, Madonna Montran (aka Donna Montran and Donna Darling). Hers was the exciting world of 1920s vaudeville. She crisscrossed the country with her many shows.

The Donna Darling Collection (See Part 76) yielded two articles that put Donna at the Stroud Theater in Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, for Thanksgiving 1921. A review of Newspapers.com, Genealogy Bank, Newspaper Archives, and Chronicling America failed to reveal any newspapers from Stroudsburg for that period. Likewise, The Ancestor Hunt was unable to indicate any Stroudsburg papers online for 1921. As such, the only evidence I have that Donna played at the Stroud Theater in Pennsylvania is her clippings.

The Stroud

Great Thanksgiving Week Program

Today and Tomorrow
5—Big Vaudeville Acts—5  

Special Thanksgiving Engagement – The Barry Jazzers
Three Walceys – Acrobatic Novelty
Whynot & Brady – Musical Act
Phil Davis – Southern Songster
Dona Montrim & Co – Singing and Dancing.

Another Clipping Donna had said

Holiday Week Program at Stroud is a Sure Fire Winner

The article goes on the say that:

“Dora Montrim & Co. have a dance and song revue with very special stage settings and costumes of Miss Montrim that are pleasing.”

We don’t know much about her show, but we know she was at the Stroud Theatre in Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, on November 24th and 25th, 1921 – One Hundred Years ago today.

 

 

Ethel Wight Collection – Part 55

Hannigan, Hansen/Hanson, Harding, Hare, & Harkins

Photo Friday
Ethel Wight Collection
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.This week, for Photo Friday, I identify the people in five more envelopes from the Ethel Wight Studio Collection[i]. The envelopes contain the names who paid for the photos, not necessarily of the individual portrayed in the image. As such, it is vital to analyze the pictures and information to identify the individual therein.[ii] Ultimately, my goal is to reunite the photos with family members who may have never seen the image.

Geraldine M. Hare, circa 1935.

This negative envelope says, “Miss Geraline Hare, Childrens Hosp, #379.”

Why I believe this to be the individual.

  • Geraldine M. Hare, circa 1935

    The 1930 US Census reports Geroline (Geraline) Hare as the 18-year-old daughter of Arthur and Clara Hare living in Monticello, Aroostook County, Maine.

  • There are no Hare’s listed in the 1934, 1935, 1936, or 1937 Portland City Directories.
  • The 1940 US Census reports Geraldean M Hare as the 28-year-old daughter of Arthur and W Clara S Hare. Geraldean is a private Nurse.

Based upon the photo ID Number (#379), this photo was taken about 1935. I am sure this is Geraldine M. Hare about 1935 when she graduated from nursing school at the Children’s Hospital at 68 High in Portland, ME.

Family Search identifies Geraldine Hare, daughter of Arthur W.and Clara (Sharp) Hare, as ID GQD3-HNT.

Nine Ancestry trees refer to Geraldine May Hare.

I have uploaded two photos of Geraldine to her Family Search Memories. 

Austin Harding, circa 1937.

.This negative envelope says, “Mrs. A. A. Harding, 30 Grafton St. #997.”

Why I believe this to be the individual.

  • Austin Harding, circa 1937

    The 1937 Portland City Directory lists Alfred A and Gladys B Harding living at 30 Grafton.

  • The 1940 US Census finds Alfred and Gladys Harding living in Malden, Middlesex County, They lived in Portland, Maine, in 1935. With them is their eight-year-old son, Austin Harding.

I am sure this is a photo of Austin Harding about 1937 when he was about five years old.

Family Search does not appear to have a profile for Austin, son of Alfred and Gladys Harding, nor do Ancestry Trees. However, 10 Ancestry trees refer to Austin’s father, Alfred Austin Harding.

I have added Austin’s photo to Dead Fred. 

John Harkins, circa 1936.

This negative envelope says, “Mrs. Ethel Harkins, 150 Grafton St #825.”

Why I believe this to be the individual.

  • John Harkins, circa 1936

    The 1936 Portland City Directory lists Walter P and Ethel M Harkins living at 150 Grafton.

  • The 1940 US Census lists Walter P and Ethyel M Harkings living at 27 Tying in Portland, Cumberland County, Maine. Living with them are six children, Lillian (16), Walter P (16), George (14), Frances (11), John (8), Constance (6), and Richard (2).
  • This photo is of a boy, taken about 1936 when George was ten and John was 4. The child in the picture appears to me to be closer to 4 or 5 than 10, so I believe it to be John.

This photo may be of George, but I believe it is John.

John Harkins, son of Walter P and Ethyel M (Trask) Harkins, is found in eight Ancestry trees.  Family Search does not appear to have a profile for John.

I have added John’s photo to Dead Fred. 

Unknown Hansen/Hanson child, about 1936
Update: Confirmed to be Harry A Hansen.

This negative envelope says, “Mrs. Harry Hanson, 129 Oxford St. #605.”

Why I believe this to be the individual.

  • Unknown (but probably either Harry A or Milliard Hansen/Hanson), about 1936

    The 1936 Portland City Directory indicates that 129 Oxford Street was at the corner with Wilmot Street; residents included the Oxford Barber Shop, Charles A. Staples, and Mrs. Delia Joyce. There are the following Harry Hanson/Hansen in the 1936 Directory:

    • Harry E – Floorman 883 Cong h 881 do apt 2
    • Harry F – Carp emp 11 St. James, r 12 Exeter*
    • Harry G (Mildred E) – Drugs 345 Cong h 31 Concord*
    • Harry G jr – clerk 345 Cong r 31 Concord*
    • Harry H (Carrie C) – VP 161 Middle h 66 Sherman*
    • Harry J (Grace E) – roadman 184 Read h 137 do
  • The 1937 Portland City Directory lists the following Hanson/Hansen:
    • Items above marked with an asterisk (*) above were repeated in the 1937 directory.
    • Harry J (Grace E 187 Read h 141 do.
  • All of the Harry Hanson/Hansen’s listed in the 1935 Portland City Directory are repeated in the 1936 Directory.
  • The 1940 US Census indicates:
    • Harry G and Mildred E Hansen live at the same address with their 12-year-old son James and ten-year-old son Milliard.
    • Harry H and Carrie Hanson are in their 70s and have no children living with them.
    • Harry J and Grace Hanson lived in East Providence, Rhode Island, with their nine-year-old son, Harry A Hansen. However, they were living in Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, in Harry A. was born in New Jersey, and his parents were born in New York. His parents were born about 1893 and 1897.

I believe this to be a photo of Harry A Hansen, son of Harry J. and Grace E. Hanson, about 1937 before they moved to Rhode Island. However, this could easily be Milliard Hanson, son of Harry G. and Mildred E. Hanson.

Harry A Hansen does not appear in any trees at Ancestry; however, Harry John Hansen, husband of Grace E Gauthier, appears in seven family trees.

Harry G Hansen was born in Maine in about 1891, and his wife Mildred was also born in Maine about 1891. Their son, Millard, was born about 1930 (age 0 during the 1930 Census). There appear to be no trees showing Millard; however, there are 21 Ancestry trees which include Harry Gilbert Hanson, with wife Mildred Edna Cushing, and father of Charles Christian Hanson.

There appear to be no Family Search Trees that include Milliard Hanson.

I have added his photo to my Flickr photostream.

Confirmed to be Harry A Hansen by a cousin.

Margaret & Anna Hannigan, circa 1937

This negative envelope says, “Mrs. John Hannigan, 106 Clark St. #928.”

Why I believe this to be the individual.

  • Margaret & Anna Hannigan, circa 1937

    The 1936 Portland City Directory lists John T Hannigan living at 106 Clark.

  • The 1937 Portland City Directory lists John T and Anna E Hannigan living at 3 Dermot Court.
  • The 1940 Census lists John T Hannigan, living at 20 Edwards Street. John is 34, divorced, and loving with his two daughters, Margaret A (age 9) and Anna M (age 7). Living with him is 29 year old Anna Dolley, a housekeeper. Both daughters were born in Maine, and John was born in Canada.
  • On 5 September 1937, Ann Elizabeth Hannigan (Née Elliott) of Portland married Lawrence Nelson Dolly, of Falmouth, in Conway, New Hampshire. It was the second marriage for both of them.
Margaret & Anna Hannigan, circa 1937

This photo appears to be of two girls, about three and six when John and Anna separated in 1937. As such, I am confident these are Margaret and Anna Hannigan about 1937.

Neither Margaret nor Anna appear to have profiles on Family Search, and neither seem to be in Ancestry Family Trees.  John Thomas Hannigan, born 20 August 1906 in New Brunswick, Canada, is identified in ten Ancestry trees and is likely the father of Margaret and Anna.

I have uploaded two photos of Margaret and Anna Hannigan to Dead Fred. (In one image, Margaret is slightly out of focus, in the other, Anna is slightly out of focus.


 Conclusion

  • I identified one individual with a Family Search profile, so I uploaded two of her photos there.
  • I identified four individuals that do not appear to have Family Search profiles, so I uploaded those photos to Dead Fred.
  • I could not differentiate two people sufficiently to determine which was in one of the photos. I am confident of the individual’s name, but not which of two children with the same name and the same name for his parents, this individual is. Consequently, I posted that photo to Dead Fred.

For all of the Ethel Wight Collection analysis, please see here.

Final Note

If any of these photos are of your family member, I would love to hear your reaction. Especially if this photo is of a loved one for whom you hadn’t seen this photograph before.


Endnotes

[i] The Wight Studio was in Portland, Maine. Many thanks to Ethel Wight’s family for access to and permission to use the collection of their great aunt.

[ii] These images were converted to positives using a lightbox, a Nikon camera, and computer software.

My Computer History

My History, My Memories
Saturday Night Genealogy Fun
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.In his blog, Genea Musings, Randy Seaver suggested that people write about their computer history – basically how we “became slaves” to our computers. I figured, because computers are such a big part of my life, it would be good to share my experience.

High School

Osseo High School, New Wing – Source: 1967 Osseo Yearbook

My first experience with computers was the “computer club” at Osseo High School. Members of the club learned to program in BASIC. We used a teletype with an acoustic coupler using a telephone. If I recall correctly, it ran at 300 bits per second. We did our programming offline and created a perforated tape to send our programs to a mainframe computer. (Again, if I remember correctly and IBM 360.) To send our programs, we would dial up the host and send our perf’ tape info. The computer would then do the work and send back the results of running the program. I was terrible at programming. I remember writing a program to generate the prime numbers from one to 1000. Most of the other kids’ programs took a second or two of computer time to generate the numbers. My program took nearly a minute—very inefficient programming by me.  Anyway, I learned enough BASIC to be dangerous.[i]

Navy Days

I didn’t work with computers directly, but I did work with crypto equipment, which was very computer-like. Some of the equipment I used had perforated tape and used the same Baudot code as my high school teletype terminal. While in the service, I took a college course in COBOL[ii] and learned some more computer skills. I also took a college course in “Introduction to Computer Systems.”

TRW

Woman at a Docuteller 300 – Courtesy Wells Fargo Archives

After my Navy time, I got a job with TRW[iii] Customer Service Division. With them, I repaired cash machines (Docutel Total Teller 300), window teller machines, and terminal processors. The Total Tellers had small minicomputers associated with them. The computers were Lockheed and CAI mini-computers. To load the program into memory, you had to enter code directly into memory to create a bootstrap program. That program then accepted the actual code from a cassette tape using a standard Radio Shack tape recorder.  Occasionally, when repairing equipment, it was necessary to write a simple program that would cause the cash machine to do a simple task, such as to pick up a money packet and deliver it to the money drawer, or pull in a card, read it, and send it back. Simple programs, but they were all done in machine language.

Metropolitan State University

commodore 64 – Photo by the NerdPatrol via Flickr. (CC 2.0)

I wrote about my experience at Metropolitan State University in “Schools I’ve Attended.” The bottom line is that I purchased a Commodore 64 and a word processing program to keep up with the rewrites I needed to do for a Non-fiction Writing class I took. That computer was the start of my using personal computers for home use. I’ve always had a home computer since then.

NAVPRO

For several years I worked for the Navy at the NAVal Plant Representative Office in Fridley, Minnesota. I worked as an Engineering Technician in the Quality Assurance Division. The office installed a Wang 2200. The system has a program called IDEAS, which was an interface to a compiler that compiled BASIC programs. I requested access and was granted access to write some programs to track waivers, deviations, and engineering change proposals. I then wrote a couple of other applications for the Quality Assurance Engineers’ use. Meanwhile, the computer programmer they hired could not get any programs he was working on to work well. The commanding officer (CO) asked if I would be willing to go TAD[iv] to the Computer Team and work on some things. After a 90 day assignment, the CO asked if I wanted to do another 90 days. I agreed. After six months, the CO asked if I’d go there permanently. I agreed and was made a Computer Specialist. There I led the integration of Wang PCs into dual roles of office automation and terminals to the Wang 2200.

DCMC

After the NAVPRO, I got a job with the Defense Contract Management Command as a computer specialist. There I worked with several different computer systems, but most importantly, I set up a Novell Netware system using Ethernet. While working for DCMC, I became Netware Certified. DCMC became its own agency (DCMA), and I continued working for them. I became certified in Microsoft Exchange Server and began working as the Exchange “subject matter expert” for the agency.

Technology Chief

I continued working for DCMA and was selected to be the Technology Chief for the Eastern District. As Chief, I had Computer Specialists in some 25 states reporting to me for technical direction[v].

FBI

After 911, I decided to apply to the FBI. I was selected for a computer specialist position at CJIS Division in Clarksburg, WV. I worked in Requirements for a while. I studied to become a PMP (Project Management Professional). I was then selected to lead the test group where we tested changes to hardware and software to IAFIS (Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System),[vi] NCIC (National Crime Information Center)[vii], and NICS (National Instant Criminal Background Check System)[viii]

Triple-I

After I retired from the government, I used my Program Management Skills and Technical know-how to put together a NOSC (Network Operations and Security Center) for a Triple-I[ix] and SAIC[x] joint project. While there, besides putting my Project Management skills to use as the site leader, I became a CISSP (Certified Information Systems Security Professional).

Today

Today, I use an iMac for my personal use and have for probably ten years or so. I knew Windows NT very well back in the day, but I get confused and frustrated when I need to use Windows 10 (it works very differently from Mac). That said, I and the “Technology Guy” at the Historical Society where I volunteer. I also help out fellow genealogy folks in several genealogy groups I am a member of, particularly if it relates to online systems (Ancestry, Zoom meetings, etc.) or Mac.

I became interested in computers when I was in high school in the 1960s and began working with them as the key component of my employment in the 1980s. I’m not sure I’d agree I’m a “slave to my computer,” but I do use mine 40 to 50 hours a week, so some people (like my wife) might agree that I am a “slave to my computer.”


ENDNOTES

[i] Good thing BASIC stands for “Beginners’ All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code.” I was definitely a beginner.

[ii] COBOL stands for “COmmon Business-Oriented Language,” and was used for data processing in business, finance, and administrative systems.

[iii] TRW stood for Thompson Ramo Wooldrige. It was qcquired by Northrop Grumman in 2002.

[iv] TAD – Temporary Assigned Duty.

[v] At that time the Computer Specialists reported to their local commanding officers for administrative purposes and most command required activities and to me for technical direction.

[vi] IAFIS is the system that law enforcement checks when fingerprints cannot be matched within their own local or state systems.

[vii] NCIC goes back to the 1960s. I remember Harry Morgan tearing off the NCIC printouts from the teletype machine and handing it to Jack Webb in the Dragnet revival.

[viii] NICS is a system used by 22 states to check that a gun purchaser is not prohibited from buying a gun.

[ix] Triple-I is Information Innovators, Inc. The company was acquired by Salient CRGT in 2017.

[x] SAIC is Science Applications International Corporation.