Eliza Jane Fannin (1861-1882)

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 25 – Eliza Jane Fannin (1861-1882)

Sometimes it is necessary to go back to the drawing board.
My records on my 2nd great-grandparents are abysmal.  I have a couple documents.  One is a paragraph titled, “Family History” and in the corner is written “oral history.”
Of course, it doesn’t have anything about who said it or when.  It is fairly old, it might go back to the 1970s, probably the 1980’s, although I’m not sure.  The second document
is is a copy of a sheet titled “Family History Carter County – KY. “
It is more of a chart than prose about the family.  I don’t know where it came from either but I think it probably came from about the same time.  Maybe it will become evident when I go back though all of the resources that I have on Joe (John) Mannin, his wife Eliza
Jane Fannin, and the rest of the Mannin clan.

From “Family History”

“Joe (John) Mannin (one-half Cherokee) & Eliza Jane Fannin Parents of Phebe Mannin (Brown) (Richmond) (Upton).  Charlie Mannin brother of Joe fought opposite of Joe in the Civil war, Joe Conferate [sic] & Charlie Union. Joe Mannin’s parents were Enoch Mannin & Minerva Tolliver (full Cherokee). Nancy Ann Mannin (Joe’s sister) married Jesse Monroe Barnett. Jesse’s son Enoch married Elizabeth Warner & are Zachariah Barnett’s parents. Zackariah married Estella (Brown) Barnett. Jesse Monroe
Barnett was a drummer boy in the civil war & run alongside Lincoln’s horse at Gettysburg & played his drum. Mary Jones was Joe Mannin’s sister and raised Phebe Mannin from a baby as her mother died when she was born.
(Enoch Barnett disappeared when Zachariah was 15, we went to northern Minnesota
to work in the logging camps & never came home.)”

[Note: I’ve added punctuation where appropriate.]

There are a number of bits of information in this document that I am sure are not true.  Once you find one certain error the rest become questionable.  We know that Joe (John) William Mannin, the son of Enoch Mannin, fought for the Union. 

The National Archives has a wonderful record that I found through Fold 3 [i] that is John William Mannin’s Volunteer Enlistment. What is really great about the document is that John was only 17 years old when he enlisted and his father, Enoch, gave his consent.  The names, places,  and dates are all spot on. Enoch also enlisted on the same date. 

Discover yourself at 23andMeSimilarly, this record states that his mother Minerva was full Cherokee. As descendants of hers, I would expect my mother to have some portion of Native American blood. All things being equal I would expect my mother to be about 1/16th (6.5%)Native American.  An autosomal DNA Test from 23 & Me indicated that that she is 99.8% European. 

Now, I know that because of the “stickiness” of DNA through the
generations it is fairly possible that the Native American segments were
lost.  However,  none of the cousins (descended from Minerva) I have been in contact with that have had DNA testing with have any Native American either. Because of this, I find that Minerva being full Cherokee as being native unlikely. Additionally, Minerva is never reported in any of the Census reports as being “Indian.”  Finally, I have not been able to find a Charlie Mannin as a brother of Joe in any of the census reports or other
documents.  Possibly “Charlie” was a cousin or other relative and was considered like “a brother.”

 

Much of the other material is accurate, but because I know several of the “facts” are incorrect, I am loathe to accept any of it.

The other document I have regarding “Family History Carter County – KY” is easy to read. It says:

Family History

Carter County – KY

 (Joe) John W. Mannin (1/2 Cherokee) Aunt Mary Brown, Eliza Jane Fannin Phebe Jane Uptons Parents sold their land to Charlie Mannin brother of John after Civil War. They fought on opposite sides
according to Victoria Brown’s letter to Lila Cole.  (John for South)

Enoch Mannin – John (Joe’s) father  }  Phebe Uptons

Minerva Tolliver – Full Cherokee    }  Grandparents

Nancy Ann Mannin Barnett – Sister to (Joe) John – Phebe’s Father

Married Jesse Monroe Burnett (Drummer boy for North in Civil War)

Elizabeth Warner Barnett (Her mother was a Horn) Father Zachariah Warner

Married

Enoch Mannin
Barnett         – Jessie Monroe’s son

Nancy Ann’s son

 

Aunt Mary & Tommy
Jones Raised Phebe from a small baby as her mother died at her birth

Aunt Mary Jones
later married George Gates

Aunt Mary Jones
and John (Joe) Mannin  (Phebe’s father)
were Brother & sister.

It is fairly clear that this
document and the other document had different authors, however, both documents
contain some of the same information. What this does do is solidify what we
believe to be family history (oral).  I
have little doubt the family believed Joe (John) fought for the South and that
they believed that Minerva was Cherokee.
I have about an inch of materials,
documents, that I need to go through (including a transcript of the letter from
Victoria Brown), catalog the sources where I can, and incorporate the
information into my tree. We will see if anything about John and Eliza becomes clarified as wade through the information.So, here is what I think I know about Eliza Jane Fannin.

Bio Eliza Jane Fannin

She was born about 1861 in
Kentucky.[ii]
She married John Mannin probably
about 1875,
She had two children, Mary
Elizabeth was born in 1876, although it could have been 1877.
In 1880 she lived in Pine Grove, Rowan
County, Kentucky with her husband and daughter Mary.[iii] [Note: Rowan and Carter counties adjoin.]
She died December 1881 or December
1882, probably in Carter County Kentucky, giving birth to her second child
Phebe.

Although I know very little about my 2nd great grandmother, Eliza Jane Fannin.List of Greats

Mary Elizabeth Manning
Eliza Jane Fannin

 

———- DISCLAIMER ———-

 

I am sorry that I messed writing
about David Swayze (Week 23) and Marion Sanford (Week 24). Due to my moving
from Georgia to Maine and due to a computer hard disk crash (which left me
computerless for 27 days), I was unable to write the past two weeks. I hope to be able to catch back up with them later.
Next week I plan to write about
Rufus Harry Darling, my wife’s great grandfather.

 


 

[i] www.fold3.com/image/#232425255
NARA M397. Compiled service records of volunteer Union soldiers who served in
organizations…
[ii] 1880 Census – Place: Pine Grove, Rowan, Kentucky; Roll: 441; Family History Film: 1254441;
Page: 453B; Enumeration District: 114; Image: 0110
[iii]
ibid.

Minerva Ann Tolliver (1821-1902)

52 Ancestors #4 – Minerva Ann Tolliver Mannin (1821-1902)

Map Courtesy of Wikipedia

Minerva Ann Tolliver was born in Kentucky on 5 Feb 1821. Various records during her life record her name in many different ways, Minerva, Manerva, Minora, and Minna.  She was probably born in Bath County, near Greenup County, in the portion of Bath that became Morgan County in 1822 and Rowan County in 1856. I also suspect near what was to become Carter County in 1838. It is also likely that the county changes account for many of the different county designations of where she lived over the years.

There is a wonderful interactive map at Kentucky Historical Counties which allows you to select a date and see what counties existed then. If can then easily see the changes in the Bath/Morgan/Rowan counties over time.
There is considerable speculation regarding her early life. One thread indicates that Minerva was Native American (Cherokee). I don’t believe this to be the case. First, in none of the Census reports was Minerva ever reported as being anything but white.  Second, as my 3rd great-grandmother, I would expect to have about 3% of her genome.  Although I do have 2% unknown or trace, there is no evidence that I have any Native American in my ancestry. Likewise, my mother, who should have approximately 6% of Minerva’s genome shows no proportion of Native American. 23 & Me indicates she has 99.4% European ancestry as do I.  Because of the “stickiness” of DNA, although unlikely, it is still possible for Minerva to be Native American. I would be very interested in the mtDNA results of any direct female descendants of Minerva – that should answer the question definitively.
Another theory is that Minerva was raised by Elijah Toliver and used his last name although she was born with the surname Mannin. This theory suggests that her father died when she was very young and her mother remarried. Her mother, Martha Patsy (Mannin), married Elijah Tolliver in 1825. Minerva was 3 years old then, so she probably wasn’t a child of Elijah. This thought is supported by Phoebe Mannin, Minerva’s granddaughter, who listed Minerva’s last name as “Mannin” when she created a family tree in 1973.
A third theory exists that Martha Patsy Mannin had Minerva out of wedlock. Thus, Minerva had the surname Mannin until Martha married. This scenario makes the most sense to me and explains many of the conflicting facts. (I think this is a case where Occam’s Razor applies and this is the simplest answer.)
The records are unclear where her parents were born. Some say Kentucky, some say Virginia. Kentucky became a state in 1792 so it is possible that her parents were born in what was Virginia but is now Kentucky. It is also possible that Elijah was used on some occasions as her father and the unknown Mannin used at other times.
She and Enoch were married on 15 Oct 1843, in Grayson, Morgan County, Kentucky, when she was 22 years old. She had nine children, five girls and four boys. Four of her children preceded her in death.
John William Mannin (1846-1888)
Isaac Wilson Mannin (1848-1931)
Nancy Ann Mannin Barnett (1849-1913)
Meredith Mannin (1851-
Sarah Jane Mannin Bryant (1855-1942)
Mary Ermaline Mannin Jones Gates (1856-1899)
Gresella Mannin (1857-1897)
Prudence Mannin Bare McDonald (1860-1898)
Robert J Mannin (1869-Following her and Enoch while they were in Kentucky is very confusing.  They appear to have moved between Bath, Carter, and Morgan counties between 1843 and 1883. (All are in northeast Kentucky.) However, as mentioned before they are all within a short distance from each other depending upon the year being considered.  This could be an excellent area for further research and study.
Her husband, Enoch, served the North during the Civil War (War of Rebellion or War of Northern Aggression depending upon your point of view)
In 1880, she and Enoch were still in Carter County, Kentucky.
She and Enoch moved to Minnesota in April 1883 to Holding township in Stearns County; their post office was Saint Anna.
Their eldest son, John William Manning, had two daughters, Mary & Phebe. John’s wife died in 1882 and the girls were living with their grandparents, Enoch and Minerva, in 1885.  We aren’t sure how long they stayed with them.

Enoch moved the family to Cass County in April, 1888. They settled on 160 acres in May Township, Cass County, Minnesota; Enoch received a homestead patent in 1894 for the land. Minerva’s life was that of a farmer’s wife; she kept house on the land that her husband owned and raised 9 children.

NE 1/4 of Section 22, Township 134 (May Township) today

A Google map view of the property (Northeast quarter of section 22, township 134 (May Township), Range 31, today indicates a swampy bit of land along a creek without any evidence of current farming or of the original homestead.  She continued to live on the farm in May township until her death in 1902.

Marker of Minerva A (Tolliver)
Wife of Enoch Mannin
Feb 5, 1821- Oct 25, 1902
Photo by Don Taylor

Minerva’s marker and death certificate are inconsistent. One says she died on October 24th the other October 25. One says died at 81 years, 8 mos, 20 days (making her birth Feb 5, 1821) the other says she died at 82 years, 8 mos, 21 days (making her birth Feb 3, 1920).  The 1821 date is probably correct as she was x9 years old during most of the earlier census reports. She is buried in Bridgeman Cemetery in Cass County.

I remember Minerva and celebrate her life today, the 193rd anniversary of her birth.

Sources

Tombstone/Marker Minerva A, Bridgeman Cemetery, Cass County, Minnesota (Personal visit)
1850 US Federal Census – Via Ancestry.Com
1860 US Federal Census – Via Ancestry.Com
1880 US Federal Census – Via Ancestry.Com

1885 Minnesota, Territorial and State Census – Via Ancestry.com
1895 Minnesota Territorial and State Censuses – Via Ancestry.com
1900 US Federal Census – Via Ancestry.Com
Department of the Interior – Bureau of Pensions – Questionnaire, Enoch Mannin – 20 Nov 1897.
———- DISCLAIMER ———-

Veterans Day – 11/11/2013 – The Browns & Others

Veterans Day – 11/11/2013 – The Browns & Others

The Civil War had a dreadful impact upon the Brown and Mannin families.  Enoch Mannin, a Kentucky native, fought for the North as did his son John William Manning,  Other of Enoch’s sons fought for the South making the Civil War one truly of brother fighting brother. 

Enoch Mannin (1823-1971) – Civil War (Union) – Third-Great Grandfather.

US Flag (35 Stars) during Civil War.
Enoch enrolled as a Private in Company E, 40th Regiment, Kentucky Mounted Infantry at Grayson, Kentucky, on 29 August 1863 for one year.  He had black eyes, black hair, a dark complexion and 5′ 6″ tall. 
His military record indicates that he was captured by Morgan in May/June 1864. Not sure yet when he was released, but he was discharged when his regiment mustered out of service on 29 December, 1864 at Leattettsburg, KY. 
The 40th Regiment had the following actions:

Scout duty in north central Kentucky until December 1863. 
Actions at Mt. Sterling December 3 and 10, 1863. 
Scouting in eastern Kentucky until May 1864. 
Near Paintsville, Ky., April 14, 1864. 
Operations against Morgan May 31-June 20. 
Mt. Sterling June 9. Cynthiana June 12. 
Duty in eastern Kentucky until September. 
Near New Haven August 2 (Company C). 
Canton and Roaring Springs August 22. 
Burbridge’s Expedition into southwest Virginia September 10-October 17.
Action at Saltville, Va., October 2. 
Duty in eastern Kentucky until December 1864.

Enoch Mannin died on 7 April, 1907. He is buried in Bridgeman Cemetery, Cass County, Minnesota. Please consider leaving virtual flowers and a note on his Find-a-Grave virtual marker.  
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John William Mannin (aka John William Manning) (1846-1888) – Civil War (Union) – 3rd-Great Grandfather.

US Flag (35 Stars) during Civil War.
John William Mannin (later Manning) enlisted 29 Aug 1863 at Olive Hill, Carter, Kentucky, USA into the 45th Regiment, Kentucky Mounted Infantry at the age of 17. His father, Enoch Mannin, gave his consent to enlist. John William was taller than his father, 5’ 9” tall.  He had blue Eyes, light hair, and a fair complexion. In September mustered into the 40th Infantry Regiment, Kentucky like his father was also in Company E. Like his father, he was captured by Morgan in May/June 1863.  He mustered out on 30 December, 1864 at Catlettsburg, Boyd County, Kentucky.
John William Manning died 25 April, 1888. We do not know where he was buried.


– – – – – – – – – – – – –
Henry Brown (aka William Henry Brown)  (1845-unk) – Civil War (Union) – 2nd-Great Grandfather.
Michigan State Flag
Henry Brown Enlisted as a private into the Union.  It is likely that he is the William Henry Brown that enlisted into 4th Regiment, Michigan Cavalry.  
Of a total force of 2,217 men, 3 officers and 48 enlisted men were killed or mortally wounded in battle, and 2 officers and 341 enlisted men perished from disease for a total loss of almost 1 in 5 (18%) dying during the war.
The 4th Michigan Cavalry was involved in the capture of Macon, Georgia, on April 20, 1865, Subsequently, a detachment of the regiment participated in the pursuit and capture of Jefferson Davis at Irwinville, Georgia, on May 10. 
The 4th was assigned to routine duty at Macon and then at Nashville, Tennessee, until the end of June. The regiment mustered out on July 1, 1865.
William Henry Brown’s death and burial location are unknown, however, he is believed to be buried in North Dakota.
– – – – – – – – – – – – –
Richard Earl Brown (aka Clifford Brown) (aka Richard Earl Durand) (1903-1990) – No War (Army) – Grandfather.
Shoulder insignia for
the 193rd Infantry
Brigade the largest
force in Panama in the
1930s. 
Little is known about Richard Earl’s military service.  We are unsure which name he used in the military and when he actually went in.  We are fairly certain that he served more than six months but did not serve during any declared war.  We know from oral history that he served in the Army and was in Panama when Donna was in Panama sometime before 1932. 
Searches for his military records have not been successful.  
“Dick” is buried at Gull River Cemetery, Cass County, Minnesota. 
Please consider leaving virtual flowers and a note on his Find-a-Grave virtual marker.  


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The Steps

Although not related directly to me, my “steps” are of interest to my half siblings and my mother’s half brother’s family.
They include two veterans  for whom I have some information.


– – – – – – – – – – – – –

Samson Clark Amsterdam (1898-1979) – World War I and World War II – Step Grandfather.

Sammy is the only individual I have found so far that served in two wars.  
On 21 November, 1917, he enlisted in the Army in Brooklyn, New York.  We know he served at 
Aberdeen Proving Ground, Harford, Maryland and was discharged from there on 23 May, 1919.
On 17 October, 1942, he enlisted in the Army at Lubbock, Texas. He is described as having brown eyes, black hair, a ruddy complexion, and 5 feet two inches tall. 
In August of 1943 he was promoted to sergeant and discharged on 4 November 1944 with the Army speciality of “Entertainment Director.”
Sammy died 16 April, 1979, and is buried at Riverside Cemetery, Macon, Bibb County, 
Georgia.
Please consider leaving virtual flowers and a note on his Find-a-Grave Memorial.  Also, request a photo of his Marker.


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Edgar Jerome Matson (aka “Bud”) (1925-2003) – World War II – Step-Father

World War II
Recruiting Poster
“Budger” enlisted in the Army on 23 March, 1944. His Serial Number was 37590415. He was reenlisted on 1 Nov 1946 while a Private First Class. He was promoted to SGT US Army prior to his honorable discharge on 2 February 1949.
He died 12 November, 2003 and is buried at Fort Snelling National Cemetery, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota.

Please visit his memorial on Find a Grave and consider leaving virtual flowers and a note on his Find-a-Grave Memorial.


Enoch Mannin

Today I am reminded about the importance of doing it right the first time.
When I first seriously began doing genealogy I was so excited by what I was finding I didn’t document things very well.  I imported GED files from others without concern.  I seldom connected the sources I did have with the data entered in my software in a meaningful way.  
When folks are starting out there is often a key, pivotal, person in your ancestry that provides the foundation for many other searches.  For me it was Enoch Mannin, my 3rd great-grandfather. Many other people were doing research on his line and they were willing to share GED files.  Also, he was readily findable in the censuses and many other places so he was a great person to research, find information, and put it in my tree without properly documenting it.  Well, that laxness finally caught up to me and I’ve spent the last several days cleaning up the sources and the links to facts for Enoch.  Not a small task. I have 26 sources of information for Enoch and many different kinds of info. Census records, Civil War records, Pension Application Records, Land Patents, Death Registration, even the image of his entry into the family bible regarding his birth. It was a lot of effort to sort out everything, remove relationships between source and data that don’t exist and create new data elements that do fit the source information.  As an example, most census records only provide a birth year estimate, plus & minus a year. Also the census records only provide the birth state, so associating the county and  specific date information is inappropriate. Consequently, I created a lot of different alternate information entries. 
His records are cleaned up and I promise to never take shortcuts in documentation again.

Biography – Enoch Mannin

Enoch Mannin/Manning was probably born 3 January 1823 in Owingsville, Bath County, Kentucky. I say probably because his enlistment papers indicate that he was 44 years old when he enlisted in 1863 which would make his birth year 1819. In various documents his birth year ranges from 1819 to 1824 but the bible record indicates 1823. 
It appears that his father and mother, Meredith and Rachel Fugate Mannin were married about two years after his birth.  Enoch was the oldest of twelve children and grew up in Bath County, Kentucky. In 1843 he married Minerva Ann Tolliver and remained married to her for nearly 60 years, until her death in 1902. They had nine children, four of which died before 1900. 
During the Civil War he volunteered for a year with Company E, 40th Kentucky Mounted Infantry Volunteers (Union) and served from September 1863 until December 1864. He lived in Carter County Kentucky when he enlisted.  On the day he volunteered, 29 Aug 1863, he also gave permission for his son, John W. Manning, my 2nd great grandfather,  to volunteer, when John W was only 17.  Also enlisting on the same day was John N. Mannin, the son of his brother Tarleton Mannin.
He served primarily in Eastern Kentucky. He was captured by Morgan in May or June of 1864. His regiment, of over 1000, lost about 1% to wounds and another 9% to disease for 102 total deaths. Much of his time was spent in scout duty. Later he would cite actions in December 1863 as the start of hearing loss and dizziness.  His regiment had action on December 2nd and 3rd which were the probable cause of his medical issues later in life. In May and June of 1864, he was involved in action against Morgan and apparently captured by Morgan during those actions.
In 1883 or 1884, Enoch moved to Holding, Stearns County, Minnesota. In the spring of 1888, Enoch and Minerva moved to Cass County, Minnesota. In 1890, Enoch applied for an Invalid pension and a disability pension and in 1894, Enoch received a land grant for 160 acres in northern Minnesota. Today, the land does not have a home on it and looks like it is mostly swamp with some woods and a little grassland. It is the Northeast quarter of the section shown in http://goo.gl/maps/zkjT7. I am sure life was tough north of Motley, Minnesota.
Minerva died in 1902 and Enoch passed five year later, on 7 Apr 1907. He is buried in Bridgeman Cemetery, about 2 miles south of his Minnesota homestead.
Sources for the above information are available at http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/40083876/person/19447704566/facts/sources