Mary Elizabeth Manning [Brown] (1878-1983)

By – Don Taylor

We know that often as a person ages their birth date
changes. Women often get younger during their adult years and then get older in
their latter years.  Mary Elizabeth (Manning) Brown was just such a woman. 

Birth
Year
Year
Source
1878
1880
Census
1879
1900
Census
1877
1910
Census
1880
1920
Census
1877
1930
Census
1877
1940
Census
1878
1965
Social Security Death Index
1876
1983
MN
Death Index
1876
1983
Marker
1876
c.
1984
Notes
of Mary’s daughter, Victoria Quelland
1878
2001
Notes
from Mary’s minister, Les Crider
1876
2005
Letter
from Mary’s daughter, Delores Pribbenow
Only three of the many documents I have indicate the birth
year I prefer, 1878, The 1880 Census is probably the most accurate; it is the
only document I have found where the data was provided by someone who was at
her birth (presumably one of her parents). 
It is corroborated by her Social Security application.  None of the records before the 1970s indicate
her birth year as 1876, the year for which she celebrated her 100th
birthday in 1976.
Going through all of the birthdates for an individual is
important. When there is a discrepancy in dates, it is important to analyze all
of the dates and determine which is likely the most accurate.

Bio – Mary Elizabeth Manning [Brown] (1878-1983)

Mary Brown

Childhood

Mary Elizabeth Manning was born on April 17, 1878, the
oldest child of John William and Elisa Jane (Fannin) Manning in rural Kentucky.
One source indicates she was born in Kernsville, Carter County, however, I
haven’t been able to find a Kernsville in Kentucky. 
The 1880 Census shows Mary living with her parents near Pine
Grove, Rowan County, Kentucky. Her sister, Phoebe, was born in January 1881.
Again, I’m not certain where, but probably either Carter County or Rowan
County. Mary’s father, John, did have another child, Robert Manning, with
another (name unknown) woman. Robert was 9 years older than Mary was. I need to
do much more research in this area. In December 1882, Mary’s mother, Eliza,
died. Oral history indicates that she died in childbirth.
There is a lot of confusion about what happened to Robert,
Mary, and Phoebe after their mother died. One story line is that Mary &
Phoebe lived with their aunt & uncle, Thomas & Mary Jones.  Another story line is that they lived for a
time with their aunt & uncle, Joe & Sarah Bryant. I know for sure that they also lived with
their grandparents, Enoch and Minerva Manning in Holding, Stearns County,
Minnesota in 1885[1].  We know that the three children’s father also
died when they were young. Family history says he was poisoned so someone could
steal money from him. One researcher indicated that John William died in 1888.
If he died so much later then it wouldn’t make as much sense as to why the
three children were living with their grandparents in June 1885. 
In
1888, Enoch moved to Cass County, Minnesota. It is unclear if that is when the
children went to live with the Joneses, the Bryants, or stayed with Enoch. 

The Child Bearing Years

Arthur Durwood & Mary Elizabeth
(Manning) Brown [date unknown]

Family oral history says that Enoch was a harsh man, so it is easy to understand why young Mary wanted to get away from him. According to Les Crider’s records, Mary married Arthur
Durwood Brown on 19 October 1892, when she was but 14 years old. This year is
confirmed by both the 1900 and 1910 Censuses. Most of the next thirty years of
her life she spent pregnant or nursing.

First was Clyde Leroy who was born 1894 in Sylvan Township,
Cass County, Minnesota.
Then the young couple moved to North Dakota. I recall Mary
telling me that they traveled to North Dakota by oxen and wagon.  I don’t know if it was this time or one of
the other times they moved as they switched between North Dakota and Minnesota
several times.
Victoria Cecelia was their first child born in North Dakota;
she was born in 1896.
They moved back to Minnesota where Clarence Arthur was born
in 1897.
The 1900 Census indicates that Mary had had four children,
three of whom were living.  That gives
rise to an unknown child probably being born in 1899 who died before 2 June
1900[2].
Cora Elsie was born in Pequot Lakes, Crow Wing, Minnesota,
in 1901.
My grandfather, Clifford Durwood Brown, was born in Robinson,
Kidder County, ND, in 1903, three days before the famous flight of the Wright
Brothers.
Two more children, Martin and Dorothy, were born between
1904 and 1907. They both died of measles before 1910.
Edward Lewis was born in North Dakota in July 1908.
Arthur Eugene was born in North Dakota in in 1909.
Charles William was the last of the children born in North
Dakota in 1914.
The family moved back to Minnesota where Delores Sarah was
born in Sylvan Township in 1917 and Nettie Mae Viola born in Pillager in 1921.

The Middle Years

In 1928, Mary’s husband of 36 years died. Mary was 50 years
old when Arthur died.  Who would have
guessed that Mary hadn’t lived half of her life at that point?
The 1930 Census shows Mary living with her three youngest
children in Fairview, Cass County, Minnesota. Nearby is her son Edward with his
new wife Mary[3].
Cora, Nettie, Delores, Arthur, and Clarence were all married
in the ensuing ten years and began having many children.  Grandchildren, and great-grandchildren were
being born frequently. Her son, Clifford had a child out of wedlock. He
illegally took custody of the child and brought her to Minnesota to be raised
by his mother and himself. He was arrested and went to prison in Illinois for
child-napping. When he got out of prison, he changed his name to Richard Earl
Durand. Some years later Richard would return to Minnesota and change his name once
again, this time to Richard (Dick) Earl Brown.
The 1940 Census shows Mary living as hired help in May
Township with Isaac Reynolds. Isaac was the local postmaster[4]

The Motley Years

Five Generation Photo
Mary Brown, Clyde Brown, Granddaughter Marie,
great granddaughter Yvonne (on far right), &
GG Granddaughter Yvonne (on Mary’s lap) – Dec 1961

Shortly afterwards (before 1943), Mary moved to Motley and
lived a very quiet life.  Apparently,
also in the 1940s her son Dick came to live in the same house. In September
1961, she became a great-great grandmother with the birth of Yvonne Marie [living].

 I remember visiting
Grandpa Dick and “Ma Brown” many times in the late 1950s and 1960s. On one
occasion, Grandpa Dick had just bought a new $50 clunker automobile.  Mary was upset with him spending money on the
car and admonished the universe with a quote I will forever remember.  “Those crazy kids and their motor cars –
cars, cars, cars, that all they think about.” She was calling my grandfather a
“crazy kid.”  He was probably about 60 at
the time and still a kid. It is all about perspective. He may have been 60 but
she was about 85 at the time and from her perspective, he was a kid.
Ma Brown was an amazing cook. She had separate cast iron
pans for fowl, beef, and venison. She made a rhubarb sauce that was amazing. We
just called it “sauce” and everyone knew which sauce we meant.  I always think of her when I see strawberry
rhubarb pie because none I’ve ever eaten since compare to her pies.  I have a pencil sharpener on my desk that
looks like a hand water pump.  It reminds
me every day about Ma Brown and her life in Motley.  In her kitchen was a hand pump, their only
source of water until into the mid 1960s. They had an outhouse that was a cool
visit in November and December. We never visited in January, so I can only
imagine – outhouse – January – Minnesota – Burrrr.  Along side the Motley house Mary kept a huge
garden – probably most of a house lot in size. She maintained it well into her late
80s, probably into her 90s.

Mary’s later years

Sadly, I think the last time I saw Mary was in 1965 or
so.  As a teenager, I didn’t have the
inclination to visit “up north.” I went into the service in 1969 and didn’t see
Mary at all during the ensuing years, although I did visit Grandpa Dick a few
times in 1970s but he was in Motley and Mary was at the Bethany Good Samaritan
Center in Brainerd.  Not visiting her in
Brainerd is something I regret not having done.
In 1976, that Mary Elizabeth Brown celebrated her 100th
birthday.  I believe it was a couple
years premature, but that is okay.  Her
celebrations continued for another seven years. She died on 8 May 1983 at the
age of 105 at the Bethany Home in Brainerd, Minnesota.
Mary E. Brown
1876 Mother 1983

She is buried at Gull River Cemetery, Pillager, Minnesota,
near her husband Arthur who died fifty-five years earlier.

Conclusion

Mary had an amazing life. She was orphaned young; she was
married young. She had 13 children and raised 10 of them to adulthood. She
lived a life without conveniences, not getting indoor plumbing until the 1960s.
She was very active in her church. In her Motley years, she cooked and canned
from her garden and prepared the game her son brought home.

There are many of Mary’s grandchildren still alive.  I would love it if they, their children, or
anyone with first-hand memories of Mary, would use the comments below to add to
the stories of their experiences with Mary Elizabeth (Manning) Brown. 
Further Actions:
Learn more about Robert Manning
Find out more about Kernsville, KY
List of Greats
1.    Mary
Elizabeth Manning [Brown] (1878-1983)
2.    
John William
Manning (1846-c.1888)
3.    
Enoch Mannin
(1823-1907)
4.    
Meridith
Mannin (1802-1885)
5.    
John Bosel
Mannin Sr. (b. 1776 in Virginia)
6.    
Samuel
Mannin  (b. abt 1756)
7.    
Meredith
Mannin (b. Abt. 1720)

[1] 1885 Minnesota,
Territorial and State Census, Ancestry.com,
1885 – Holding,
Stearns County, Minn – Page 3 (Post Office: Saint Anna).
[2] 1900 Census, Ancestry.com, 1900; Census Place: Township 136, Crow Wing,
Minnesota; Roll: 761; Page: 2A; Enumeration
District: 0069; FHL microfilm: 1240761.
[3] United States of
America, Bureau of the Census. Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930.
Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1930. T626,),
Year: 1930; Census Place: Fairview, Cass, Minnesota;
[4] 1940 Census, Ancestry.com, Year: 1940; Census Place: May, Cass, Minnesota; Roll: T627_1912; Page: 10A;
Enumeration District: 11-33.

Clifford Brown (aka Richard Earl Durand, aka Richard Earl Brown) (1903-1990)

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 38 – Clifford
Brown (aka Richard Earl Durand, aka Richard Earl Brown (1903-1990)

By – Don Taylor
No Story too Small
We all have someone in our tree that is confusing. It is
that person that the more you learn about them; the more you know you do not
know. My grandfather was such a person. It wasn’t until I began doing genealogy
that I learned his birth name. I also knew he went by another name but didn’t
have a clue why. Back in the late 1990s, I asked his sister, Delores, about the
name changes and again I asked her about it in the 2000s, and she avoided
answering. She said she didn’t want to speak ill of the dead and that “Dick”
was her “favorite brother.” I so wish I hadn’t let her take that stand. In the
following years, thanks to Genealogy Bank, I learned much about my grandpa Dick, things that I would
have never imagined. Through that research I think I know why the changes in
name.

Bio – Clifford Brown (aka Richard Earl
Durand, aka Richard Earl Brown (1903-1990)

Richard Earl Brown always
carried a hunting knife.
Photo: about 1953 source unknown

Clifford Brown was born on 14 September 1903, in Robinson,
Kidder County, North Dakota. He was the sixth child of thirteen born to Arthur
Durrwood and Mary Elizabeth Manning Brown.

He spent much of his childhood in the rugged and very
isolated homestead at the N1/2-NW1/4&SW1/4-NW1/4
– Section 34, Township 144 North Rang 72 West of the 5th Principal Meridian. 

Today
it is a land devoid of buildings or evidence the family ever homesteaded there.
Wikipedia indicates that Robinson had a population of 37 people in the 2010 Census[1]. Merkel, the other town mentioned in some of the
records regarding the family indicates a population of 39 people[2]. The entire county only has a population of 2,435
and the total area is about 1,351 square miles[3], which means that there are less than two people
per square mile today. Talk about isolated.

In 1917 (aged 14) his
family moved back to the “civilized lands” of Minnesota. His father received a
land patent, in township 138N (now Sylvan Township), Range 029W, Section
7,  NE1/4-Nw1/4, N1/2-NE1/4, SE1/4-NE1/4.
(Modern GPS: 46.7911918, -94.4073918 –  NW Corner of L shaped property.)

In 1928, his father died
of liver cancer[4].

Here is where things get
complicated. His daughter believes that he went into the service sometime
before 1931 as Richard Earl Durand. I don’t think so.  There are stories that he might have been a
spy and had that name as a spy. Other stories indicate he was in show business
while in the military and Richard Earl Durand was his stage name. In either event,
it is understood that Clifford and Madonna Mae Montran met in Panama City, Panama
in 1931 while he was in the service. They had a liaison, which produced a daughter, Sylvia. Madonna was
married to Samson Amsterdam at the time. The story there is that Samson
remained married to Madonna until the child was born, “to give it a name” then
quietly divorced. After the divorce, the oral history says that he pursued Madonna more.

Copyright 2005 Heritage Microfilm, Inc. and Newspaperarchive.com
The Brainerd Daily Dispatch
18 October 1932

The dates here get quite
confusing. Sylvia was born in January of 1932, so she must have been conceived
in Panama in April 1931. By October of 1932, Clifford returned to Minnesota and
was apparently out of the service and was going by the name of Clifford Brown (again?). We
know this because Clifford Brown got into a fight in the parking lot of a dance
hall with Irwin Thompson. Irwin died and Clifford was charged with Manslaughter[5]. Clifford was held in the Walker jail until a
grand jury could consider the case. I have been unable to find a disposition of
the grand jury’s decision and haven’t found where Clifford was tried or
sentenced so I believe he wasn’t indicted. However, I’m sure his reputation was
sullied.

opyright 2005 Heritage Microfilm, Inc. and Newspaperarchive.com
The Brainerd Daily Dispatch
10 April 1935

Apparently, Clifford
didn’t like how Madonna (Donna) was raising his daughter, the three year-old
Sylvia, and on March 10th, 1935 he abducted his
daughter from Chicago and brought her back to Minnesota. We would probably not know anything
of this except Chicago police officers came to Minnesota and arrested Clifford
and brought him back to Illinois without going through extradition. The
Minnesota governor was upset to have a Minnesotan taken without due process. There
were many articles in the Brainerd Daily Dispatch regarding Governor Olson
protesting to Governor Horner (of Illinois) regarding the abduction of a
Minnesota citizen by Illinois law enforcement[6]. I am still searching for case files of that case
and how long he served in prison in Chicago. Family legend says that when
Clifford was released from prison he contacted Donna one more time to see if
she would marry him. She wouldn’t and the two went their separate ways.  I believe that Clifford’s name was so tarnished from the manslaughter and the child abduction that he took on the name of Richard Earl Durand upon his release from prison. 

414 Pine Street
Brainerd, MN
Courtesy: Aunt Barbara

On 22 Feb 1936 Clifford
Brown, now Richard Earl Durand, married Dorothy Louise Wilhelm in Chicago. The
couple located to 414 Pine Street, Brainerd, Minnesota sometime before July, 1937, which is where they lived when
their first daughter was born. They moved back to Chicago within the year after their first child’s birth to be
there when their second daughter, Mary Lou Durand was born. The 1940 Census finds the
Durand family at 3621 Belmont (which is now a new construction building).
Not much is known about
Richard during the 1940s and 1950s. We are not sure where he was or what he was
doing. Family history indicates that he returned to Minnesota and located with
his mother in Motley. Photos that appear to be from the late 1940’s and early
1950’s show him with his mother, Mary Brown. Certainly, during this time he
became known as Dick Brown.

Dick’s daughter Barbara outside
Hanson Minnow Tackle Worm shop
Motley, Minnesota circa. 1960
Courtesy: Aunt Barbara 

I remember going up to
Grandpa Brown and Ma Brown’s house from the early 1950s. There is a photo of me
and one of my Great Aunt Deloris’ kids sitting on Ma Brown’s lap about 1953 or
so. For me, Grandpa Brown was the major male role model in my life. Dick was an
avid hunter and fisher. He worked at the Hanson Minnow Tackle Worm shop with his cousin Meretta.
(I’m not sure who owned it Meretta or her husband Fred or if Dick was a part owner or not.) In any event several years later, he ran his own minnow shop next to the El Ray Truck Stop. It was with Grandpa Brown that I tagged along when he
went deer hunting and saw my first deer kill. I went duck hunting, partridge
hunting, and was privy to his special place for fishing out on Lake Shamineau
where he could always catch fish. I went wild ricing with him and gained an
appreciation for the great outdoors. Hunting and fishing were Grandpa’s primary
source for protein. 

I have so many stories
about Grandpa Dick and his mother, Ma Brown. 
One story that comes to mind occurred sometime in the mid 1960s. Dick’s
old beater of a car broke down and wasn’t worth repairing, so he bought a “new”
$50 clunker. His mother saw the “new” car and started ragging on him and “Those
crazy kids and their motor cars — that’s all they think about is cars, cars,
cars!” The exchange pointed out that even my grandfather, who was in his 60s,
was just a kid to his mother. I will forever be a kid to all my ancestors.
Sylvia, Matt, Don, & Grandpa Dick – Circa 1977
Source: Don Taylor Photo Collection

I went into the service in
1969 and didn’t see Grandpa Brown but a couple of times during the 1970s. He
married Cecelia Ann Squires in 1975. Sometime after he married Cecelia, I visited them with my mother and my son and had a “four generation” photograph taken. Not
very good quality, but we were all there.

I am not sure when he went into the United District Nursing Home in Staples, MN, which is where he died on 19 Jan 1990. He was buried at Gull River Cemetery in Sylvan Township, Cass County near his mother and many other family members.

I remember Grandpa Dick fondly. My appreciation for the
outdoors comes from Grandpa Dick. Grandpa Dick instilled the importance of
eating what you kill into me. In remembrance of his birth 111 years ago, I will
raise a toast to him.
Further Actions:
·      Make a concerted effort to network with other
descendants of the Brown Family.
·      Develop a closer relationship with my half aunt and
her children, my half first cousins.

List of Greats
1.    
Arthur
Durrwood Brown
2.    
Henry Brown
3.    
Benjamin
Brown

Please comment below if you have anything you would like to add to the story of
Clifford Brown, Richard Earl Durand, or Richard Earl Brown.

———- DISCLAIMER ———-


Endnotes:

[4] Minnesota, Death
Certificate, Arthur D Brown.; Don Taylor, Maine.
[5] Brainerd Daily
Dispatch – 1932-10-18, Manslaughter filed against Clifford Brown.
    Manslaughter charge is filed
against Brown in Thompson Death
[6] Brainerd Daily
Dispatch – 1935-04-10, Appeal to Illinois Governor Illegal Removal of Brown. —   Minnesota
    Governor Olson protested to Governor Horner be wouldn’t fight
to have Clifford Brown returned.

Minerva Ann Tolliver (1821-1902)

52 Ancestors #4 – Minerva Ann Tolliver Mannin (1821-1902)

County Map of Kentucky
Courtesy: Wikipedia
Minerva Ann Tolliver was born in Kentucky on 5 Feb 1821. Various records during her life record her name in many different ways, Minerva, Manerva, Minora, and Minna.  She was probably born in Bath County, near Greenup County, in the portion of Bath that became Morgan County in 1822 and Rowan County in 1856. I also suspect near what was to became Carter County in 1838. It is also likely that the county changes account for many of the different county designation of where she lived over the years.
There is a wonderful interactive map at Kentucky Historical Counties which allows you to select a date and see what counties existed then. If can then easily see the changes in the Bath/Morgan/Rowan counties over time.
There is considerable speculation regarding her early life. One thread indicates that Minerva was Native American (Cherokee). I don’t believe this to be the case. First, in none of the Census reports was Minerva ever reported as being anything but white.  Second, as my 3rd great-grandmother, I would expect to have about 3% of her genome.  Although I do have 2% unknown or trace, there is no evidence that I have any Native American in my ancestry. Likewise, my mother, who should have approximately 6% of Minerva’s genome shows no proportion of Native American. 23 & Me indicates she has 99.4% European ancestry as do I.  Because of the “stickiness” of DNA, although unlikely, it is still possible for Minerva to be Native American. I would be very interested in the mtDNA results of any direct female descendants of Minerva – that should answer the question definitively. 
Another theory is that Minerva was raised by Elijah Toliver and used his last name although she was born with the surname Mannin. This theory suggests that her father died when she was very young and her mother remarried. Her mother, Martha Patsy (Mannin), married Elijah Tolliver in 1825. Minerva was 3 years old then, so she probably wasn’t a child of Elijah. This thought is supported by Phoebe Mannin, Minerva’s granddaughter, who listed Minerva’s last name as “Mannin” when she created a family tree in 1973.
A third theory exists that Martha Patsy Mannin had Minerva out of wedlock. Thus, Minerva had the surname Mannin until Martha married. This scenario makes the most sense to me and explains many of the conflicting facts. (I think this is a case where Occam’s Razor applies and this is the simplest answer.)
Kentucky State Flag
Courtesy: Wikipedia
The records are unclear where her parents were born. Some say Kentucky, some say Virginia. Kentucky became a state in 1792 so it is possible that her parents were born in what was Virginia but is now Kentucky. It is also possible that Elijah was used on some occasions as her father and the unknown Mannin used at other times.
She and Enoch were married on 15 Oct 1843, in Grayson, Morgan County, Kentucky, when she was 22 years old. She had nine children, five girls and four boys. Four of her children preceded her in death.

John William Mannin (1846-1888)
Isaac Wilson Mannin (1848-1931)
Nancy Ann Mannin Barnett (1849-1913)
Meredith Mannin (1851-
Sarah Jane Mannin Bryant (1855-1942)
Mary Ermaline Mannin Jones Gates (1856-1899)
Gresella Mannin (1857-1897)
Prudence Mannin Bare McDonald (1860-1898)
Robert J Mannin (1869-

Following her and Enoch while they were in Kentucky is very confusing.  They appear to have moved between Bath, Carter, and Morgan counties between 1843 and 1883. (All are in northeast Kentucky.) However, as mentioned before they are all within a short distance from each other depending upon the year being considered.  This could be an excellent area for further research and study.

Her husband, Enoch, served the North during the Civil War (War of Rebellion or War of Northern Aggression depending upon your point of view) 

In 1880, she and Enoch were still in Carter County, Kentucky.  
She and Enoch moved to Minnesota in April 1883 to Holding township in Stearns County; their post office was Saint Anna.

Their eldest son, John William Manning, had two daughters, Mary & Phebe. John’s wife died in 1882 and the girls were living with their grandparents, Enoch and Minerva, in 1885.  We aren’t sure how long they stayed with them. 

NE 1/4 of Section 22, Township 134 (May Township) today
View Larger Map
Enoch moved the family to Cass County in April, 1888. They settled on 160 acres in May Township, Cass County, Minnesota; Enoch received a homestead patent in 1894 for the land. Minerva’s life was that of a farmer’s wife; she kept house on the land that her husband owned and raised 9 children.

A Google map view of the property (Northeast quarter of section 22, township 134 (May Township), Range 31, today indicates a swampy bit of land along a creek without any evidence of current farming or of the original homestead.  She continued to live on the farm in May township until her death in 1902.

Marker of Minerva A (Tolliver)
Wife of Enoch Mannin
Feb 5, 1821- Oct 25, 1902
Photo by Don Taylor

Minerva marker and death certificate are inconsistent. One says she died on October 24th the other October 25. One says died at 81 years, 8 mos, 20 days (making her birth Feb 5, 1821) the other says she died at 82 years, 8 mos, 21 days (making her birth Feb 3, 1920).  The 1821 date is probably correct as she was x9 years old during most of the earlier census reports.

She is buried in Bridgeman Cemetery in Cass County.

I remember Minerva and celebrate her life today, the 193rd anniversary of her birth.

Sources: 
Tombstone/Marker Minerva A, Bridgeman Cemetery, Cass County, Minnesota (Personal visit)
1850 US Federal Census – Via Ancestry.Com
1860 US Federal Census – Via Ancestry.Com
1880 US Federal Census – Via Ancestry.Com

1885 Minnesota, Territorial and State Census – Via Ancestry.com
1895 Minnesota Territorial and State Censuses – Via Ancestry.com
1900 US Federal Census – Via Ancestry.Com
Department of the Interior – Bureau of Pensions – Questionnaire, Enoch Mannin – 20 Nov 1897.
Google
Wikipedia

———- DISCLAIMER ———-


Enoch Mannin

Today I am reminded about the importance of doing it right the first time.
When I first seriously began doing genealogy I was so excited by what I was finding I didn’t document things very well.  I imported GED files from others without concern.  I seldom connected the sources I did have with the data entered in my software in a meaningful way.  
When folks are starting out there is often a key, pivotal, person in your ancestry that provides the foundation for many other searches.  For me it was Enoch Mannin, my 3rd great-grandfather. Many other people were doing research on his line and they were willing to share GED files.  Also, he was readily findable in the censuses and many other places so he was a great person to research, find information, and put it in my tree without properly documenting it.  Well, that laxness finally caught up to me and I’ve spent the last several days cleaning up the sources and the links to facts for Enoch.  Not a small task. I have 26 sources of information for Enoch and many different kinds of info. Census records, Civil War records, Pension Application Records, Land Patents, Death Registration, even the image of his entry into the family bible regarding his birth. It was a lot of effort to sort out everything, remove relationships between source and data that don’t exist and create new data elements that do fit the source information.  As an example, most census records only provide a birth year estimate, plus & minus a year. Also the census records only provide the birth state, so associating the county and  specific date information is inappropriate. Consequently, I created a lot of different alternate information entries. 
His records are cleaned up and I promise to never take shortcuts in documentation again.

Biography – Enoch Mannin

Enoch Mannin/Manning was probably born 3 January 1823 in Owingsville, Bath County, Kentucky. I say probably because his enlistment papers indicate that he was 44 years old when he enlisted in 1863 which would make his birth year 1819. In various documents his birth year ranges from 1819 to 1824 but the bible record indicates 1823. 
It appears that his father and mother, Meredith and Rachel Fugate Mannin were married about two years after his birth.  Enoch was the oldest of twelve children and grew up in Bath County, Kentucky. In 1843 he married Minerva Ann Tolliver and remained married to her for nearly 60 years, until her death in 1902. They had nine children, four of which died before 1900. 
During the Civil War he volunteered for a year with Company E, 40th Kentucky Mounted Infantry Volunteers (Union) and served from September 1863 until December 1864. He lived in Carter County Kentucky when he enlisted.  On the day he volunteered, 29 Aug 1863, he also gave permission for his son, John W. Manning, my 2nd great grandfather,  to volunteer, when John W was only 17.  Also enlisting on the same day was John N. Mannin, the son of his brother Tarleton Mannin.
He served primarily in Eastern Kentucky. He was captured by Morgan in May or June of 1864. His regiment, of over 1000, lost about 1% to wounds and another 9% to disease for 102 total deaths. Much of his time was spent in scout duty. Later he would cite actions in December 1863 as the start of hearing loss and dizziness.  His regiment had action on December 2nd and 3rd which were the probable cause of his medical issues later in life. In May and June of 1864, he was involved in action against Morgan and apparently captured by Morgan during those actions.
In 1883 or 1884, Enoch moved to Holding, Stearns County, Minnesota. In the spring of 1888, Enoch and Minerva moved to Cass County, Minnesota. In 1890, Enoch applied for an Invalid pension and a disability pension and in 1894, Enoch received a land grant for 160 acres in northern Minnesota. Today, the land does not have a home on it and looks like it is mostly swamp with some woods and a little grassland. It is the Northeast quarter of the section shown in http://goo.gl/maps/zkjT7. I am sure life was tough north of Motley, Minnesota.
Minerva died in 1902 and Enoch passed five year later, on 7 Apr 1907. He is buried in Bridgeman Cemetery, about 2 miles south of his Minnesota homestead.
Sources for the above information are available at http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/40083876/person/19447704566/facts/sources