Don’t avoid those Bright Shiny Objects.

Brown Research

Bright Shiny Objects - Photo by arbyreed - CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
Bright Shiney Objects

Photo by Arbyreed (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

 

I’ll admit it; I get diverted from my goals by Bright Shiny Objects (BSOs).  I was working on a problem ancestor of mine, my third great-grandmother, Mary C. LNU (Last Name Unknown), about whom I know very little.

Bio – Mary C. (LNU) Brown (1823-?)

What I think I know:

  • She was born about 1824 in New York.[i]
  • She probably married Barney/Daney Brown about 1841.[ii]
  • In 1850, she was living with her apparent husband, Barney, and two children, William H and Myron O Brown in Saline, Washtenaw County, Michigan.[iii]
  • In 1860, she and her apparent husband, Daney, were living with four children, Henry W, Myron O, Alice C. and David V. Brown in Saline, Washtenaw County, Michigan.[iv]
  • In the 1870 census, it appears that she is living alone.[v] Her son, Henry, was married and making a life with his wife and two children nearby. Not sure where Myron, Alice, or David were. I can’t find them nor their father, Barney/Daney, in the 1870 census either. So, I figured he possibly died in the Civil War. Certainly, I have a lot more research to do to determine if one of the many Browns who fought for the Union was my Barney/Daney Brown.

Newspapers

After I had figured out that I had exhausted my many searching methods on Family Search, Ancestry, and Genealogy in Time (read Google) for Mary, Barney/Daney, and the children, I thought I’d see if there were any newspapers of the area. I like using The Ancestor Hunt to seek out newspapers. I research Michigan enough that I have a bookmark right to Kenneth Mark’s Michigan page in my browser. I click it, then do a {Control/f} to “find” type “Saline” and–Bang–there were three newspapers listed for Saline. One was 1958-2014, outside of my possible range. But two were in the 1800s, both at Central Michigan University. So, off I go (metaphorically speaking).

Digital Michigan Newspapers – It is a “Bright Shiny Object.”

I quickly figured out how to search only the Saline papers and found lots of articles about various Browns, but none that appeared to be about this family unit.  (It might be really helpful if I decide to do a locational surname study.)  But this is a nice site.  I’d just bet I can find some juicy bits of information there – It It looks like it is a BSO!

Newspaper Clipping - Obituary - Janette A. Arnold Wakefield Parsons
Obituary Janette A. Arnold Wakefield Parsons

I went back to my genealogy program (I use Heredis) and selected the people who had any event in Saline in my database – 45 people.  I’ll bet some of these people are in those papers. As I worked through the list, at first I didn’t find articles about lots of them, A tantalizing bit here and there, like Sarah Young had perfect attendance in school in 1881. Then, I hit some really important articles. My 4th great-grandfather, Chester Parsons’ personal property was auctioned off by the administrator of his estate. Awesome detail of what was going up for sale, “12 cows, 16 head young cattle, seven head horses, 52 acres wheat on the ground and a large quantity of farm implements. Eighty acres of timber land is also offered for sale at a bargain.”  Very interesting stuff. I even learned that someone named Daniel Reeves lived on Chester Parson’s farm for six years, including two years while Chester was still alive.[vi] Who was Daniel Reeves and why was he living on the Parson farm?  I also found the obituary for Chester Parson’s second wife, which provided the date he married her, her maiden and widowed names, and her daughter’s names.  Those names might be helpful when I find Chester Parsons’ probate records.

The bottom line is that in a couple hours of investigating this BSO, I learned a couple dozen facts, developed several new avenues of inquiry and had a lot of fun.  I know that I probably should have kept to my research goal: What was Mary C [Brown]’s maiden surname? I still don’t know the answer to that, but I do know lots of new things. So it is okay with me that I diverted to look at the BSOs. The information I found added texture to my understanding of the lives of several ancestors. So, I’m glad I didn’t toss aside that Bright Shiney Object once I knew it wouldn’t answer my research question. I hope you find BSOs you can have fun with also.

Future Actions:

  • Research Mary C. [Brown] and determine her maiden surname, place of birth, death, etc. (Again.)
  • Find the Probate Records for Chester Parsons (1799-1887) – Washtenaw County, Michigan.
  • Determine if Barney/Daney Brown served in the Civil War.
  • Determine if there is a relationship between Daniel Reeves and the Parsons family.
———-  DISCLAIMER  ———-
newspapers-com-234x60-2  newspapers-com-234x60-2

ENDNOTES

  • [i] The 1850, 1860, and 1870 census records for her are all consistent, 26, 36, and 46 years old respectively.
  • [ii] Their first child, William Henry Brown, was born about 1842 in Michigan.
  • [iii] United States Census, 1850,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MF8P-F8S : accessed 23 March 2016), Barney Brown, Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan, United States; citing family 185, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • [iv] “United States Census, 1860”, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MWDZ-DLM : accessed 23 March 2016), Daney Brown, 1860.
  • [v] Year: 1870; Census Place: Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan; Roll: M593_708; Page: 315B; Image: 166772; Family History Library Film: 552207  Ancestry.com. 1870 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.
  • [vi] Saline Observer (Saline, MI) – 1891-12-10, Pg 5, Column 2 (last paragraph) – via Digital Michigan Newspapers; Central Michigan University
.

newspapers-com-234x60-2 newspapers-com-234x60-2

Surname Saturday – Brown

 Meaning – Brown Name Meaning

English, Scottish, and Irish: Generally a nickname referring to the color of the hair or complexion, Middle English br(o)un, from Old English brun or Old French brun. As an American family name, it has absorbed numerous surnames from other languages with the same meaning.[i] The name is from an old adjective meaning ‘brown dark red,’ Old English and OHG. [ii] Read More About This Surname

Geographical

Although only ranked #202 in the world, the surname Brown is ranked #2 in Scotland and Canada, #3 in Australia, and #4 in England and the United States. In the United States, it is surpassed only by Smith, Johnson, and Williams in frequency.[iii]

In the 1840s, the Brown families in the United States were in every state but concentrated in Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York.[iv]

My Brown Ancestors

#96 – My earliest known Brown ancestor is my 4th great-grandfather, Odel Brown. I know virtually nothing about Odel other than he was probably born about 1773, he married a woman named Jane and had at least two children, David and my 3rd great-grandfather, Barney Brown.

#48 – Barney/Daney Brown was born in New Hampshire about 1814. He married a woman named Mary probably about 1840.[v] Barney and Mary had at least four children, William Henry, Myron O., Alice C., and David V. Brown. Barney/Daney Brown seems to have vanished from the records after 1860 and before 1870, so I believe he died before 1 June 1870.

#24 William Henry Brown (he apparently went by Henry) was born in 1842 in Michigan. I speculate that he married Marion Sanford in 1866.[vi] They had 11 children that I know of.

  1. Arthur Durwood Brown
  2. Nettie May Brown
  3. Charles Dean Brown
  4. Mary Brown
  5. Almond Brown
  6. Gerome Clifford Brown
  7. William Henry Brown
  8. Clyde Hewett Brown
  9. Frederick Brown
  10. Ada Brown
  11. Edward Warberton Brown

William Henry Brown appears to have died between 1885 and 1900.

Arthur Durwood Brown

#12 Arthur Durwood Brown was born about 1864 in Michigan. He married Mary Elizabeth Manning in 1891. Arthur and Mary had twelve children:

  1. Clarence Arthur Brown
  2. Clyde Leroy Brown
  3. Victoria Cecelia Brown
  4. Martin Brown
  5. Cora Elsie Brown
  6. Richard Earl Brown (Aka Clifford Durand Brown)
  7. Dorothy Brown
  8. Edward Lewis Brown
  9. Arthur Eugene Brown
  10. Charles William Brown
  11. Delores Sarah Brown
  12. Nettie Mae Viola Brown

Arthur Durwood Brown died on 27 Aug 1928 in Walker, Minnesota.

Richard Earl Brown

#06 Richard Earl Brown was born 14 September 1903 as Clifford Durwood Brown. He had a daughter, my mother, with Madonna (Donna) Montran. He always wanted to marry Donna, but she said, “No.”

He changed his name to Richard Earl Durand and married Dorothy Amanda Wilhelm. Dick, as he was known, and Dorothy had two children. Living Durand and Mary Lou Durand. He married Cecelia Ann Squires in 1975.

Richard Earl Brown died 19 January 1990.

My Direct Brown Ancestors

  • #96 – Odel Brown (c. 1796-?)
  • #48 – Barney/Daney Brown (c.1814-c.1860)
  • #24 – William Henry Brown (1842-c.1895)
  • #12 – Arthur Durwood Brown (1864-1928)
  • #6 – Richard Earl Brown (aka Clifford Durwood Brown, aka Richard Earl Durand) (1903-1990)
  • #3 – My mother – (Living)
  • #1 – Me – Generation

My known Brown relatives.

My records have 248 direct-line descendants of Barney/Daney Brown identified over nine generations, which is about 5% of my known Brown/Montran family tree. Looking at the Browns another way, I have 144 individuals with the surname of Brown in my Brown/Montran family tree, the most of any surname.

ENDNOTES

[i] Ancestry.com; Dictionary of American Family Names ©2013, Oxford University Press via http://www.ancestry.com/name-origin?surname=Brown

[ii] Web: Forebears – http://forebears.io/surnames/brown

[iii] Web: Wikipedia – List of most common surnames in North America
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_most_common_surnames_in_North_America

[iv] Ancestry.com; From the 1840 US Federal Census Date – http://www.ancestry.com/name-origin?surname=Brown

[v] William Henry Brown was born in 1842 and is believed to be the first child of Barney and Mary Brown. Assuming they did marry, that would estimate they married about 1840.

[vi]   Marian’s first child was born in 1867 when she was 20. I guesstimate she and Henry were married about a year earlier when she was 19.

———- DISCLAIMER ———-

Do you have a Brown ancestor?  Do you think that ancestor is one of mine?  If so, let’s prove it.  If you have tested with Ancestry, Family Tree, or 23 & Me, please contact me through the comments field below.  If you haven’t tested, I recommend you do so. Either FamilyTreeDNA or Ancestry.Com tests will easily show the genetic connection.

 

 

William Henry Brown’s parents were not who most researchers indicate they were.

When a conflict arises regarding an individual’s parents, it is important for me to reset all my assumptions and start afresh. Such is the case with one my more frustrating areas of research, the Browns of Saline, Washtenaw County, Michigan. In a previous post, Henry Brown (c. 1843-c. 1888), I mentioned was not convinced that the Henry Brown that married Marion Sanford was the child of Benjamin Brown as most researchers have found.
In my continuing Brown research, my next research subject was going to be William Henry Brown’s father.  I began researching Benjamin Brown. I did a thorough look at his facts and determined that although Benjamin Brown did have a son named Henry, this Henry could not be the Henry Brown who married Marion Sanford, had 11+ children (Including my great-grandfather, Arthur Durwood Brown), and located to Dakota Territory about 1883.
To recap, I am certain of the information regarding William Henry Brown back to the 1870 Census. I then found William Henry Brown in the 1860 and 1850 Censuses always in Saline, Michigan.   
Henry Brown, son of Barney & Mary C. Brown
Year
Location
Event
Est Birth Yr.
1885
Dakota Territory
1885 Census[i] – W. H. Brown with wife Marion, and 11 children (Including Arthur).
1843
1884
Dakota Territory
Youngest son, Edward, born in Dakota Territory.
1882
Saline, Michigan
Youngest daughter, Adia born in Michigan.
1880
Saline, Michigan
1880 Census[ii] – Henry Brown (Age 37) with wife Marian & 8 children including Arthur
1843
1870
Saline, Michigan
1870 Census[iii] – Henry Brown (Age 25) with wife Marion & 2 children including Arthur.
1845*
1860
Saline, Michigan
1860 Census[iv] – Henry W Brown, (Age 17) in the household of Daney & Mary C. Brown with three siblings including Myron O Brown.
1843
1850
Saline, Michigan
1850 Census[v] – William H Brown, (Age 8) in the household of Barney & Mary C Brown with 1 sibling, Myron O. Brown.
1842
1842
Saline, Michigan
Birth?
(* Red indicates an outlier.)
Although William Henry Brown usually went by Henry, 1885, 1860, and 1850 Censuses, taken together, indicate why I believe his name to be William Henry Brown.
As I mentioned, many researchers have Henry Brown the son of Benjamin Brown and Eliza Fowler as the Henry who married Marion Sanford, etc. Following that Henry Brown, we see him in the 1850 and 1860 Census with Benj & Eliza, but in the 1870 Census, we find in living with William Brown (an apparent brother).
Henry Brown, Son of Benjamin & Eliza Fowler Brown
Year
Location
Event
Est Birth Yr.
1842
Michigan
Birth?
1850
Vernon, Mich.
1850 Census[vi] – Henry Brown, (Age 7) in the household with Benj. & Eliza Brown. Including William Brown (Age 10)
1843
1860
Vernon, Mich.
1860 Census[vii] – Henry Brown, (Age 16) in the household with Benjamin & Eliza Brown.
1844
1870
Vernon, Mich.
1870 Census[viii] – Henry Brown, (Age 28) living with William Brown (age 30)
1842
Clearly the [William] Henry Brown, who married Marion Sanford, and was the father of Arthur Durwood Brown, cannot be the same person as Henry Brown of Vernon.
I was pretty sure I needed to make this correction two years ago when I last looked at William Henry Brown’s life. Now, after reanalyzing the information I am certain.
In my research and records, I have corrected William Henry Brown’s parents to be Barney (Daney) and Mary C. Brown. I’ve also corrected my Brown/Montran Tree on Ancestry.com appropriately.

ENDNOTES

[i] 1885 Census Index – Dakota Territory; W. H. Brown – Census Records: page 44-018; NDSU Archives; http://library.ndsu.edu/db/census/family?ed=44-018-09.
[ii] 1880 Census; Henry Brown – Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan, ED 237, Page 21, Line 50; Ancestry.com.
[iii] 1870 Census; Henry Brown – Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan, Page 17, Line 18, Family 115; Ancestry.com.
[iv] 1860 Census; Daney (Barney) Brown – Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan, Line 34, Family 643; Family Search; https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MWDZ-DLM.
[v] 1850 Census; Barney Brown – Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan, citing family 185; Family Search; https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MF8P-F8S.
[vi] 1850 Census; Benjamin Brown – Michigan, Shiawassee, Vernon, (Image 14 of 16) Lines 29-38; Family Search; https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MF8G-92K.
[vii] 1860 Census; Benjamin Brown – Michigan, Shiawassee, Vernon Township, Page 55, Line 11; Family Search; https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MWDR-XSL.
[viii] 1870 Census; Ancestry.com.;  Census Place: Vernon, Shiawassee, Michigan; Roll: M593_704; Page: 459A; Image: 512; Family History Library Film: 552203
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Cousin Dawn & the Appleton Ancestors

In the presentation I am giving next Wednesday evening at the Scarborough Museum on “Social Networking for Genealogy,” I emphasize the importance of connections. Connections with people and connecting with cousins are among the best. A cousin, who is into genealogy, cares about the accuracy of your family tree, particularly at your shared ancestor and beyond. They may also have researched areas that you haven’t and can provide great insight into potential sources and facts. I tentatively accept a lot of information from cousins; however, I flag the source and know that I need to try to find original documents to replace my tentative source as having come through someone else’s research.
An example of this is my cousin Dawn M. Through Ancestry.Com’s DNA test I had a match with a 4th to 6th cousin, Dawn M. (Not to be confused with my 1st cousin, Dawn M.) First, through Ancestry’s “Send Message,” then through direct emails, we quickly learned that our first common ancestors are Henry and Marion (Sanford) Brown. They are 2nd great-grandparents to both of us, thus making us 3rd cousins. According to Ancestry.Com, Dawn M. and I share 29.9 centimorgans across 4 DNA segments. It is really interesting to note that my half-sister, Glennis, and Dawn M. share more than double the DNA, 77 centimorgans across 5 DNA segments and is predicted by Ancestry to be 3rd cousins. Seeing that difference in shared DNA between Dawn M. and Glennis compared to between Dawn M. and me reinforces the importance of testing siblings as well to better identify DNA connections and improve the odds of finding the best possible matches. In this case, I almost didn’t pursue contacting with Dawn M because the suggested match was so distant (4th to 6th cousins).
I shared my tree on Ancestry.Com with Dawn and she shared a genealogy file she works with. It was 276 pages of information. Nearly overwhelming – No it was overwhelming. I decided to analyze her material based upon surnames. The first surname we matched alphabetically was “Appleton.” Samuel Appleton, Esq. and his wife Hannah are our 10th great-grandparents.
I had a lot of information she didn’t have, much of it from Chandler Wolcott’s book, The Family of HENRY WOLCOTT published in 1912. What is really good about that source is that it is available through the Internet Archive (a key genealogical research tool). Anyway, I sent her a link to the book and sent her an extract of the appropriate pages. Her information included the names and relationships for four 11th, four 12th, and two 13th great-grandparents. Just learning the names and potential sources for the information is huge and is a great beginning. Learning the probable names of 10 new ancestors is always a good day.
8 new ancestors thanks to 3rd cousin Dawn.
Altogether, just the Appleton section (15 of 276 pages) provided details, which I didn’t have before, on 25 individuals. As slow as I am, (I like to think of myself as thorough instead of slow) this is several days of verification and validation research, thirteen of which are direct ancestors.
2 new ancestor names
thanks to 3rd cousin Dawn
In all the Appleton material, there were only two minor items that were in conflict with what I have. Both these conflicts give me additional research areas so I can double or triple verify my interpretations of other sources. If I still disagree with Dawn M.’s assessment, then I’ll let her know my thoughts and why.
Thanks to DNA Testing, I found a third cousin, Dawn M. Thanks to communications with her I was able to assess that her unpublished tree. Thanks to that assessment, I have tentatively added twenty-five new ancestors. Yes, social networking can provide amazing results.  Five percent done, only 95% to go.

BM-25 – Marion Sanford (1846-c.1893)

BM-25 – Marion Sanford (1846-c.1893)

52 Ancestors – Week 92
My second great grandmother, Marion Sanford, was born between 02 Jun 1846 and 01 Apr 1847 in Michigan[i],[ii]. The 1850, 1860, 1870, 1880 and 1885 Dakota Territory census records are all consistent with those dates. She was the first child of William M Sanford and Mary E Parsons[iii]. She had six siblings: Elva P, Almon C, William A, George P, and two whose names are Unknown.

“Winter Scene on Saline Area Farm.”
“Winter Scene on Saline Area Farm.”Photo Courtesy:  University of
Michigan Library Digital Collections

In the 1850 Census she was living in Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan with her parents and a one-month-old “infant” who is most likely a sibling whose name is unknown. Also living with them were J. W. Sanford, age 19, and Charlie Sanford, age 11[iv]. Their relationship is unknown but I suspect they were siblings of William.

It appears that the family moved to Indiana about 1857-58, because her siblings Elva and Elmon (Almon) were born in Michigan; but, her youngest sibling, Willie, whose age was one during the 1860 Census was born in Indiana. The infant from the 1850 census appears to be missing. Interestingly enough, the 1860 Census shows her name as Mary, living in Aurora, Dearborn County, Indiana and she was attending school. She was counted in the census on 01 Jun 1860 in Aurora, Dearborn, Indiana (Attending School)[v].
When she was 19, she married W Henry Brown, son of Benjamin Brown and Eliza Fowler, about 1866 in Michigan[vi].
1. Nettie May Brown was born about 1867 in Michigan[vii].
2. Arthur Durwood Brown was born on 05 Dec 1869 in Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan[viii].
Saline RR Depot Opened c. 1870
Photo Courtesy: Saline Area Historical Society
She lived in Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan, on 01 Jun 1870 (Keeping House)[ix].
3. Charles D Brown was born about 1871 in Michigan[x].
4. Mary Brown was born about 1872 in Michigan[xi].
5. Ahnond Brown was born on 01 Apr 1873 in Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan[xii].
6. Clifford Gerome Brown was born in 25 Nov 1875 in Michigan[xiii].
7. William Henry Brown was born about 1876 in Michigan[xiv].
8. Clyde Hewett Brown was born in Apr 1877 in Michigan[xv].
9. Frederick Brown was born on 25 Jan 1878 in Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan[xvi].
She lived in Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan, on 01 Jun 1880 (Keeping House)[xvii].

10. Adia Brown was born on 01 May 1882 in Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan

[xviii].

Photo Courtesy Saline Area Historical Society
A large fire burned much of downtown Saline May 21st 1881. I wonder if the fire, and it causing the loss of business and customers in Saline contributed to the Browns leaving Saline and moving west, to Dakota Territory sometime between 1882 and 1883[xix].
11. Marion and Henry’s youngest child, Edward Warberton Brown, was born on 31 Jan 1884 in Robinson, Kidder County, North Dakota[xx].
The 1885 Dakota Territory Census indicated that the W. H. Brown family lived in Jamestown, Stutzman County, Dakota Territory[xxi]. Jamestown was founded in 1872 and was a river crossing for the Northern Pacific Railroad. In 1873, Stutzman County became the first county in Dakota Territory. In 1883, Jamestown incorporated as a city and in 1889, North Dakota became a state. So, the Brown family were settlers in the Dakota Territory and many of them were still in North Dakota when it became a state.
I have been unable to find either Marion or her husband W Henry Brown in any records after 1885, so I have no death or burial information regarding Marion. By 1900, the children of Henry and Marion appear to have disbursed. Their youngest, 16 year-old Ed, was staying with Charlotte Sanford, the widow of his first cousin, once removed, so I suspect that both Marion and Henry had died by then.

Endnotes:

[i] 1860 United States Federal Census (A), Ancestry, http://www.Ancestry.com, 1860 – Indiana, Dearborn, Aurora, Page 420, Dwelling 220 – Wm Sanford.
[ii] 1885 Census – Dakota Territory, NDSU Archives, Page 44-018. http://library.ndsu.edu/db/census/family?ed=44-018-10.
[iii] History of Washtenaw County, Michigan:  Together with Sketches of Its Cities, Villages and Townships… (1881), Pg 1409. Imgage, Google Books (http://books.google.com/books?id=2z0XAQAAMAAJ).
[iv] 1850 United States Federal Census (A), Ancestry, http://www.Ancestry.com, 1850; Michigan, Washtenaw, Michigan, Page 737 & 738, Dwelling 214 – Wm Sanford. http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=try&dbid=8054&h=3267880.
[v] 1860 United States Federal Census (A), Ancestry, http://www.Ancestry.com, 1860 – Indiana, Dearborn, Aurora, Page 420, Dwelling 220 – Wm Sanford.
[vi] Speculation. Marian’s first child was born in 1867 when she was 20. I guess-timate she and Henry were married about a year earlier when she was 19.
[vii] 1870 Census, Ancestry, http://www.Ancestry.com, 1870; Census Place: Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan; Roll: M593_708; Page: 316A; Image: 86; Family History Library Film: 552207. http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1870usfedcen&h=27532996&indiv=try.
[viii] Minnesota, Division of Vital Statistics, Certificate of Death, Arthur D Brown.; Minnesota Historical Society.
[ix] 1870 Census, Ancestry, http://www.Ancestry.com, 1870; Census Place: Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan; Roll: M593_708; Page: 316A; Image: 86; Family History Library Film: 552207.
[x] 1880 Census, Ancestry, http://www.Ancestry.com, 1880; Census Place: Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan; Roll: 609; Family History Film: 1254609; Page: 276B; Enumeration District: 237; Image: 0033 AND Image: 0034.
[xi] Ibid.
[xii] Department of Vital Records, Michigan, Births, 1867-1902 (Lansing, MI, ), Family Search, Almond Brown, 01 Apr 1873. https://familysearch.org/pal:/mm9.1.1/nqn7-56v.
[xiii] World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918, Ancestry, http://www.Ancestry.com, Registration State: North Dakota; Registration County: Kidder; Roll: 1819445, Page 113 of 141.
[xiv] 1880 Census, Ancestry, http://www.Ancestry.com, Year: 1880; Census Place: Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan; Roll: 609; Family History Film: 1254609; Page: 276B; Enumeration District: 237; Image: 0034.
[xv] 1900 Census (A) (National Archives and Records Administration), Ancestry, http://www.Ancestry.com, Year: 1900; Census Place: Wells, Wells, North Dakota; Roll: T623_1234; Page: 10A; Enumeration District: 214.
[xvi] Department of Vital Records, Michigan, Births, 1867-1902 (Lansing, MI, ), Family Search, Fred Brown, 25 Jan 1878.       .
[xvii] 1880 Census, Ancestry, http://www.Ancestry.com, 1880; Census Place: Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan; Roll: 609; Family History Film: 1254609; Page: 276B; Enumeration District: 237; Image: 0033 AND Image: 0034.
[xviii] Department of Vital Records, Michigan, Births, 1867-1902 (Lansing, MI, ), Family Search, Adia Brown, 01 May 1882.
[xix] Speculation: Adia was born in 1882 in Michigan and Edward was born in North Dakota in January 1884.
[xx] California, Death Index, 1940-1997 (Ancestry.com. California, Death Index, 1940-1997 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000.), Date: 1964-03-31.
[xxi] 1885 Census – Dakota Territory, NDSU Archives, Page 44-018.
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