Pension – Asa Roberts – Death of Patience A. Roberts

Amanuensis Monday

Pension – Asa Roberts – Death of Patience A. Roberts

Transcription by Don Taylor
2 January 2017


_____OCT 15 1919_____

To the Chief, Finance Division:

You are hereby notified that check #5120565 for $75 00/100

dated Oct 4 1919 in favor of:  PATIENCE A ROBERTS
post-office Whittington  ILL
Certificate #244427  C  W  WID
Class CIVIL WAR R  R  1

Section ____2____ has been returned to this office by the Postmaster
with the information that the pensioner died July 26 or 27-1919
and said check has this day been canceled.

Very respectfully,

(D-3)                                                    GUY O. TAYLOR,
–                                                             DISBURSING CLERK.

Pension - Asa Roberts - Death of Patience A Roberts
Pension – Asa Roberts – Death of Patience A Roberts

1895 Minnesota Census – Jessie & Nancy Barnett

Census Sunday

Brown/Montran
Mannin

Census records are the mainstay of genealogical research.  One of my favorite census records is the 1895 Minnesota State Census.  Not only does it provide much of the information you would expect in a Census – Name, Age, Sex, Race, Place of Birth, and Occupation – it provides information about how long males over 21 have been in the state, how long they have been in the Enumeration District, and if they were a soldier or sailor in the War of Rebellion (Civil War).

When I learned my new cousin (See: Keep Trees Wide, Not Deep) was a descendant of Jessie M. and Nancy A (Mannin) Barnett, I wanted to add a bit more about them and their children into my tree information.

1895 Minnesota Census. Cass County  - Jesse Barnett
1895 Minnesota Census. Cass County – Jesse Barnett

Sure enough.  I learned Jessie (and presumably the entire family) moved to Minnesota about March 1883 (12 years and 2 Months before the 1 June 1895 Census) and moved to May Township (Township 134, Range 31) about March 1886 (9 years and 2 months before the Census.) Sarah being born in Minnesota and Albert being born in Kentucky confirms the arrival in Minnesota date. I also learned that Jessie was a soldier in the War of Rebellion. I also received confirmation about several of the children’s dates and places of birth. Finally, the census showed one child, John M. Barnett, whom I had no record of before. The 1895 Census does not provide relationships; however, it is a fairly safe bet that John M was the son of Jesse and Nancy. I tentatively added him to my listing of children and will work to confirm the relationship later.

My transcription notes:

1895 Minnesota Census – Jessie Barnett, Cass County[i]

Enumeration Date was 1 June 1895.

Township 134, Range 31 (May Township)

  • Name                           Age      Born Res. St/ED    Occ.   Mos.     War 
  • Barnett, Jessie M.        46        KY       12, 2; 9, 2,       Farmer 12,       Soldier
  • Barnett, Nancy A.         46        KY
  • Barnett, Albert M          14        KY
  • Barnett, Sarah M.         12        MN
  • Barnett, Martin W         9         MN
  • Barnett, John M.      7         MN
  • Barnett, Jessie W          4          MN

Endnotes

[i] “Minnesota State Census, 1895,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MQ6T-52G : 26 November 2014), Jessie M Barnett, Township 134N, Range 31W, Cass, Minnesota; citing p. 3, line 21, State Library and Records Service, St.Paul; FHL microfilm 565,765.

———-  DISCLAIMER  ———-
TTT_Ancestry_logo

Veterans Day 2015

Today I remember my ancestors that served in the military.

I know of 64 relatives who served in the military, ten of whom are my direct ancestors.  Six of those 10 served in the Revolutionary War and two served in the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR – Union).

My Grandfather – Clifford Durwood Brown (1903-1990) (aka Richard Durand, aka Richard “Dick” Brown) served in the Army. Little is known about his peacetime military service. In 1928, he was in the army stationed in Panama. He was a member of the base’s champion basketball team (See: Article.  In 1930, he met my Grandmother in Panama.  It appears that he was discharged in 1931.

2nd Great Grandfather – John William Manning (1846-1888)

Civil War – GAR

29 Aug 1863 – Enlisted at 17 years of age into the 45th Regiment of Kentucky. His father, Enoch Mannin, gave his consent for young John William to enlist.
Between May and June of 1864 he was captured by the South (Morgan).
He mustered out on 30 Dec 1864.

3rd Great Grandfather – Enoch Mannin (1823-1907)
Civil War – GAR

29 Aug 1863 – Enlisted in the 45th Regiment of Kentucky.
Between May and June of 1864 he was captured by the South (Morgan)
He was discharged on 29 Dec 1864 at Leattettsburg, KY.

5th Great Grandfather – Reuben Fowler (1753-1832)

Revolutionary War Veteran. Service time unknown (by me).

6th Great Grandfather – John Maben 1753-1813) Revolutionary War (DAR – Patriot # A072838) Private – 1st Claverack Batt, 9th Regt.

Private – Capt Hawley, Col Van Ness; Albany Co.Mil/New York

 

6th Great Grandfather John Parsons, Sr  (1737/1738-1821)

Revolutionary War (DAR – Patriot# A088240

Lieutenant – Second LT in Capt Samuel Wolcott, 10th Co, 1st Berkshire Cnty Regt of MA Militia.

 

Lieutenant – Also LtCap Elijah Daming, Col Ashley

 

6th Great Grandfather – Wicks Weeks Rowley (1760-1826)

 

Revolutionary War (DAR – Patriot # A09932

Private – New York Militia

6th Great Grandfather – Samuel Wolcott (1736-1802)

Revolutionary War (DAR Patriot # A127434

Captain – 10th Co, 1st Regt, Berkshire Co Militia; Col Hopkins Regt to Highlands.

7th Great Grandfather – Grover Buel  (1732-1818)

Revolutionary War (DAR – Patriot # A016639

He was a soldier of the Dutchess Co. New York Militia 6th Regiment.

He received Land Bounty Rights

First Flag of New England 1686-1707

8th Great Grandfather – Samuel Wolcott (1679-1734)

“He commanded a military company.”
According to “The Family of HENRY WOLCOTT” by Chandler Wolcott See: https://archive.org/details/wolcottgenealogy00wolc

He probably served in either King Williams War 1688-1697 or Queen Ann’s War (1702-1713). These wars were the first two of the four French and Indian Wars, which pitted New France against New England.

Finally, My Uncle Russell Kees fought in Korea.

My stepfather, Edgar Jerome Matson fought in World War II

My step great-grandfather Sammy Amsterdam served during World War I.

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Peter Fletcher Howell (1842-1924)

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 32 – Peter Fletcher Howell (1842-1924)

By Don Taylor
Peter Fletcher Howell
Thanks to Robert Capel via Flickr

There is a kind of look in his eye that says he has seen too much – To much killing for sure. The Civil War was a horrific event – So much killing, so much carnage. A lot of fought here and there, but Peter Fletcher Howell was part of the 61st Infantry Regiment Virginia that saw action throughout the war. Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Savannah were all major battles. In my research, I found that one of the more horrific family stories was most likely true. Peter was there; and sadly to say, yes, his regiment did what the family stories told.

Bio – Peter Fletcher Howell (1842-1924)

Peter Fletcher Howell was born 2 June 1942, the fourth child of Peter M and Caroline M. A. Pankey Howell in Buckingham County, Virginia. 

When he was young, five or six, his family moved from Virginia to North Carolina, first to Murfreesboro, then Raleigh, Kitty Hawk, Wilmington, New Burn, then finally to Halifax County. His father, Peter M, was a preacher, a fire and brimstone Baptist preacher that preached wherever he could. When Peter M found a congregation, to they moved which is why they moved so much in the early years. Finally, when Peter F. was about eight his father found a steady congregation and appears to have stayed in Halifax County throughout most of Peter F.’s youth.

In 1860, Peter F was living with his parents and an older brother, Phillip C Howell. Peter was working as a farm laborer.[i] With war breaking out, it appears that Peter didn’t want to wait to join up with the slowly forming regiments in North Carolina. Peter went the sixty miles north to Sussex County Virginia and enlisted on 23 Oct 1861. Peter must have been a great soldier because he was promoted to fourth Sergeant on 22 May 1862. He then transferred to Company G, Virginia 61st Infantry Regiment on 8 Aug 1862.

On July 15, 1864, he was promoted to full second Sargent probably during the time of the great losses that the regiment was experiencing at the Siege of Parkersburg. On July 30th, the Union blew up a mine creating a huge crater. To make a long story short, the Union (stupidly) went into the crater to attack the Confederates and instead became the target A black company of union troops was sent to reinforce the first troops who went into the crater. . Confederate Brig. Gen. William Mahone later called the event a “turkey shoot.” According to a Wikipedia article, many black soldiers were killed by Confederate bayonets and musket fire even after surrendering. In addition, many more black soldiers were killed by Union soldiers who feared reprisals from the Confederates.[ii]

The Richmond Daily Dispatch reported that Sargent Peter Howell was at The Crater and captured on of the Union flags, which clearly places him there. [iii]

Family legend told the story that Peter was part of a group that was on the edge of a pit (crater) firing down on the Union soldiers below in a “turkey shoot.” He was also told to bayonet the Black soldiers if he wanted to get a furlough to go home for a couple days. It was a horrific day; one of the many that Peter Fletcher Howell saw.

Peter was promoted to Full first Sergeant on 15 Feb 1865 and mustered out on 9 April 1865 at Appomattox, VA. 

There is some oral tradition that indicated that Peter was the only one of six boys who lived through the Civil War in that family. I know of his brother Philip C and his brother Lorenzo but I have no knowledge of their lives after 1860. There is also a six year gap between Peter and his sister Elizabeth suggesting there might be another child or two that I don’t know about.

After the war, Peter married Susan R. Vincent (sometime Vinson) on 10 December 1866. Wasting no time, their first child, Anna Lee Howell was born 10 month later.

Children of Peter Fletcher Howell and Susan R. Vincent Howell

Anna Lee Howell – 8 Oct 1867
John D. Howell – abt 1873*
Augusta E Howell – abt 1875
Martha F Howell – abt 1877
James Dallas Howell – 2 Sep 1879
David Bushrod Howell – 3 Oct 1881
G. C. Howell – Feb 1884

Marker SGT Peter F Howell
Courtesy: Find a Grave

With such a large gap between Anna and John, I suspect there may have been children born during those years that I haven’t learned about

In 1880, Peter is in Faucetts as a farmer and in 1900 he appears again as a watchman living in a rented house in Conocondy. In 1910, he is working as an engineer at a sawmill and living in Weldon. His wife of 43 years, Susan, died on 1 March 1910

He continued living in Weldon until his death on 27 October 1924. He is buried in Cedarwood Cemetery in Weldon.

Further Actions:

Continue research into Peter F. Howell’s military (CSA) service. 
Research Peter Howell’s siblings and their lives.
Research for other potential children of Peter F. Howell.

List of Greats
1.    Peter Fletcher Howell
2.     Peter M. Howell


Confederate Soldier Records - Fold3

[i] 1860; Census Place: Western District, Halifax, North Carolina; Roll: M653_899; Page: 471; Image: 323; Family History Library Film: 803899. http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1860usfedcenancestry&h=41288528&indiv=try.

[iii] Tuff University, Perseus Hopper, Richmond Daily Dispatch: August 3, 1864. http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A2006.05.1135%3Aarticle%3D3.

Eliza Jane Fannin (1861-1882)

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 25 – Eliza Jane Fannin (1861-1882)

Sometimes it is necessary to go back to the drawing board.
My records on my 2nd great-grandparents are abysmal.  I have a couple documents.  One is a paragraph titled, “Family History” and in the corner is written “oral history.”
Of course, it doesn’t have anything about who said it or when.  It is fairly old, it might go back to the 1970s, probably the 1980’s, although I’m not sure.  The second document
is is a copy of a sheet titled “Family History Carter County – KY. “
It is more of a chart than prose about the family.  I don’t know where it came from either but I think it probably came from about the same time.  Maybe it will become evident when I go back though all of the resources that I have on Joe (John) Mannin, his wife Eliza
Jane Fannin, and the rest of the Mannin clan.

From “Family History”

“Joe (John) Mannin (one-half Cherokee) & Eliza Jane Fannin Parents of Phebe Mannin (Brown) (Richmond) (Upton).  Charlie Mannin brother of Joe fought opposite of Joe in the Civil war, Joe Conferate [sic] & Charlie Union. Joe Mannin’s parents were Enoch Mannin & Minerva Tolliver (full Cherokee). Nancy Ann Mannin (Joe’s sister) married Jesse Monroe Barnett. Jesse’s son Enoch married Elizabeth Warner & are Zachariah Barnett’s parents. Zackariah married Estella (Brown) Barnett. Jesse Monroe
Barnett was a drummer boy in the civil war & run alongside Lincoln’s horse at Gettysburg & played his drum. Mary Jones was Joe Mannin’s sister and raised Phebe Mannin from a baby as her mother died when she was born.
(Enoch Barnett disappeared when Zachariah was 15, we went to northern Minnesota
to work in the logging camps & never came home.)”

[Note: I’ve added punctuation where appropriate.]

There are a number of bits of information in this document that I am sure are not true.  Once you find one certain error the rest become questionable.  We know that Joe (John) William Mannin, the son of Enoch Mannin, fought for the Union. 

The National Archives has a wonderful record that I found through Fold 3 [i] that is John William Mannin’s Volunteer Enlistment. What is really great about the document is that John was only 17 years old when he enlisted and his father, Enoch, gave his consent.  The names, places,  and dates are all spot on. Enoch also enlisted on the same date. 

Discover yourself at 23andMeSimilarly, this record states that his mother Minerva was full Cherokee. As descendants of hers, I would expect my mother to have some portion of Native American blood. All things being equal I would expect my mother to be about 1/16th (6.5%)Native American.  An autosomal DNA Test from 23 & Me indicated that that she is 99.8% European. 

Now, I know that because of the “stickiness” of DNA through the
generations it is fairly possible that the Native American segments were
lost.  However,  none of the cousins (descended from Minerva) I have been in contact with that have had DNA testing with have any Native American either. Because of this, I find that Minerva being full Cherokee as being native unlikely. Additionally, Minerva is never reported in any of the Census reports as being “Indian.”  Finally, I have not been able to find a Charlie Mannin as a brother of Joe in any of the census reports or other
documents.  Possibly “Charlie” was a cousin or other relative and was considered like “a brother.”

 

Much of the other material is accurate, but because I know several of the “facts” are incorrect, I am loathe to accept any of it.

The other document I have regarding “Family History Carter County – KY” is easy to read. It says:

Family History

Carter County – KY

 (Joe) John W. Mannin (1/2 Cherokee) Aunt Mary Brown, Eliza Jane Fannin Phebe Jane Uptons Parents sold their land to Charlie Mannin brother of John after Civil War. They fought on opposite sides
according to Victoria Brown’s letter to Lila Cole.  (John for South)

Enoch Mannin – John (Joe’s) father  }  Phebe Uptons

Minerva Tolliver – Full Cherokee    }  Grandparents

Nancy Ann Mannin Barnett – Sister to (Joe) John – Phebe’s Father

Married Jesse Monroe Burnett (Drummer boy for North in Civil War)

Elizabeth Warner Barnett (Her mother was a Horn) Father Zachariah Warner

Married

Enoch Mannin
Barnett         – Jessie Monroe’s son

Nancy Ann’s son

 

Aunt Mary & Tommy
Jones Raised Phebe from a small baby as her mother died at her birth

Aunt Mary Jones
later married George Gates

Aunt Mary Jones
and John (Joe) Mannin  (Phebe’s father)
were Brother & sister.

It is fairly clear that this
document and the other document had different authors, however, both documents
contain some of the same information. What this does do is solidify what we
believe to be family history (oral).  I
have little doubt the family believed Joe (John) fought for the South and that
they believed that Minerva was Cherokee.
I have about an inch of materials,
documents, that I need to go through (including a transcript of the letter from
Victoria Brown), catalog the sources where I can, and incorporate the
information into my tree. We will see if anything about John and Eliza becomes clarified as wade through the information.So, here is what I think I know about Eliza Jane Fannin.

Bio Eliza Jane Fannin

She was born about 1861 in
Kentucky.[ii]
She married John Mannin probably
about 1875,
She had two children, Mary
Elizabeth was born in 1876, although it could have been 1877.
In 1880 she lived in Pine Grove, Rowan
County, Kentucky with her husband and daughter Mary.[iii] [Note: Rowan and Carter counties adjoin.]
She died December 1881 or December
1882, probably in Carter County Kentucky, giving birth to her second child
Phebe.

Although I know very little about my 2nd great grandmother, Eliza Jane Fannin.List of Greats

Mary Elizabeth Manning
Eliza Jane Fannin

 

———- DISCLAIMER ———-

 

I am sorry that I messed writing
about David Swayze (Week 23) and Marion Sanford (Week 24). Due to my moving
from Georgia to Maine and due to a computer hard disk crash (which left me
computerless for 27 days), I was unable to write the past two weeks. I hope to be able to catch back up with them later.
Next week I plan to write about
Rufus Harry Darling, my wife’s great grandfather.

 


 

[i] www.fold3.com/image/#232425255
NARA M397. Compiled service records of volunteer Union soldiers who served in
organizations…
[ii] 1880 Census – Place: Pine Grove, Rowan, Kentucky; Roll: 441; Family History Film: 1254441;
Page: 453B; Enumeration District: 114; Image: 0110
[iii]
ibid.