DNA Match leads to 3rd Great’s

Autosomal DNA
Brown/Manning/Fannin Line

By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.On 23 and Me, I contacted a cousin I’ll call “JK.” The individual shared 1.34% of his DNA with my mother and .77% of his DNA with me. He also shared .91% of his DNA with my Aunt Barbara.  Because of the match with Aunt Barbara, the match is on my mother’s father’s (Dick Brown) line and the amount of DNA suggested a second to third cousin with my mother.

JK responded to my inquiry after a few months and indicated that he had been adopted and that his mother was Elizabeth Fannin. He also provided a link to his mother’s obituary.  I immediately became excited. My 2nd great grandmother was Eliza Jane Fannin and I don’t know much about her. Fannin is a popular name in Kentucky and because Eliza could easily be Elizabeth, I hadn’t been able to identify Eliza Jane’s parents.  Could I find the common ancestor between JK and me that would lead to new discoveries?

The obituary for Elizabeth Fannin showed her father was Mason Fannin.[i] I was a little concerned because Mason Fannin was born in West Virginia and my Eliza Jane Fannin was born in Kentucky, but I continued on. The 1930 Census confirmed the Mason Fannin family with his wife and several of the children mentioned in the obituary.[ii]  More importantly, Mason’s parents were born in Kentucky.  I appeared to be on the right trail.

Photo of Andrew Jackson "Jack" Fannin
Andrew Jackson “Jack” Fannin

Next, I was able to find Mason Fannin’s parents in West Virginia Births. His parents were Jack Fannin and Susan McKnight.[iii]

Family Search quickly show me that Jack Fannin was Rev. Andrew Jackson Fannin (1863-1952)  (Family Search ID L2DN-DKR). It also showed that Rev. Andrew Jackson Fannin had a sister, Eliza Fannin born 1856. Their (Jack & Eliza) parents were [unknown] Fannin and Cynthia Ann Bare.

 

Chart of relationships

JK Individual
Elizabeth Fannin Parent
Mason Fannin Grandparent
Andrew Jackson Fannin Great-grandparent
[Unknown & Cynthia Ann Bare 2nd Great-grandparents

 

[Unknown] & Cynthia Ann Bare 2nd Great-grandparents
Eliza Jane Fannin Great-grandmother
Mary Elizabeth Manning Grandmother
Richard “Dick” Brown Parent
My mother Individual

So, if [Unknown] and Cynthia Ann (Bare) Fannin are the common ancestors between JK and my mother they would be 3rd cousins. That fits the range of shared expected DNA for both my mother and her half-sister, Aunt Barbara. JK would also be a 3rd cousin once removed to me fitting the shared DNA that JK and I share[iv].

Family Search also indicates that Andrew Jackson and Eliza Jane Fannin had four other siblings, providing a wealth of clues and leads.

Do I know for certain that this Eliza Fannin is my Eliza Jane Fannin?  No, but the evidence is compelling enough to sketch in the relationship and continue researching the family.  If I find something inconsistent with my known history for Eliza Jane I’ll reconsider and relook at the relationship, however, I have confidence that I’ve broken through a small wall and puts Eliza’s parents next in my Brown Research.

Endnotes


[i] News Herald, Files (Personal), Betty J. [Fannin] DeMark  POSTED: 04/13/10, 12:01 AM EDT. http://www.news-herald.com/general-news/20100413/betty-j-demark.
[ii] 1930 Census (NARA), Ancestry.Com, Mason Fannin – West Virginia Fayette Kanawha District 0024. http://search.ancestry.com/search/collections/1930usfedcen/99823152/printer-friendly.
[iii] West Virginia Births, 1853-1930, West Virginia Culture, Delayed Birth Certificate – Mason Fannin – Oct 18, 1885.jpg. FamilySearch : 4 December 2014), Mason Fannin, 18 Oct 1885; citing Caperton, Fayette, West Virginia, United States, county courthouses, West Virginia; FHL microfilm 1,992,467. http://(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X55N-NK3.
[iv] I use the DNA Geek’s DNA Detectives Autosomal Statistics Chart to predect relationships.  See: http://thednageek.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/DNA-Detectives-Autosomal-Statistics-Chart.png

DNA, the X Chromosome & Minerva Tolliver Manning

For many years, I have been hearing the stories that my 3rd Great Grandmother, Minerva Tolliver Manning was “Full-Blooded Cherokee.” I’ve never believed it and have written about the possibility of Minerva being Native American a few times before. Please see:


Ever being the skeptic, I considered that my grandmother had really gotten pregnant from a different man other than whom she said was the father. She was apparently estranged from her husband at the time of her pregnancy and anything is possible. (She never suggested that her husband was the father.) If the man she always said was the father actually was, then my mother’s half-sister will show the same genetic information on their X-chromosome.

My half-aunt was tested and sure enough, they are half sisters, which we expected. What is really cool is that for a person’s 22 chromosomes they are a mix of each of their parents, however, for the 23rd chromosome, the XX, a girl receives one X from their mother and one X from their father. The mother’s X is a blend of her parents but the father’s contribution is passed on with little to no change. That means that if two girls share the same father then one of the X chromosomes is identical between the two girls. My mother and my half-aunt share one X exactly, so we know, beyond any doubt, they share the same father.

Person
Name
% contribution atDNA
% cont. of X Chromosome
Individual
Mom & Half Aunt
100%
100%
Father
Clifford/Dick
50%
100%
Grandmother
Mary Manning
25%
50%
Great-grandfather
John W. Manning
12.5%
50%
2nd Great-Grandmother
Minerva Tolliver
6.25%
25%
3rd Great-Grandfather
Tulion Tolliver
3.125%
12.5%
As you can see from
the above table, a person’s 2rd Great-Grandmother provides four
times the contribution to an X chromosome than to the normal atDNA
contribution. If Minerva was full-blooded Cherokee as family history says then,
alternating sex through generations, her 2nd great-granddaughters should
have about 25% Native American contribution. Not there.  According the test results from 23 & Me,
their identical X-chromosome shows no Native American contributions.  
What is very interesting is that although both my mom and my
aunt are over 99% European, there is a .2% Sub-Saharan contribution overall and
it is on the X chromosome.  Looking at
only the shared X chromosome it appears to be between 4% and 6% of the X contribution.
That would be in keeping with a 4th or 5th Great-Grandparent’s
contribution.  If Minerva were ¼ to 1/8th
Sub-Saharan African, she would have had about the right percentage to “pass” as Native
American.  From the DNA evidence that
appears to me to be much more likely of a scenario than for Minerva to have
been Cherokee.
My Mom’s X results
My Aunt’s X results



 

Future Activity
As the saying goes, a mother knows her own children, but fathers can be a surprise. As such, I’m confident that Clifford/Dick was Mary’s child. I am also confident that Enoch and Minerva believed that Mary (and her sister Phoebe) were their granddaughters. Mary and Phoebe were orphaned and Enoch and Minerva raised them for a while.

Although reasonable and likely, there is always a possibility that someone else jumped into the mix. I know next to nothing about Mary’s parents, John William Manning and Eliza Jane Fannin. It is always possible that John William Manning wasn’t Mary’s father. Mary had a half brother, Robert, but we are not certain if he was John’s child or Eliza’s child who took on the surname of Manning. In either event, I don’t believe that line will provide much in the way of proof. Rather, Minerva had five daughters, Nancy Ann, Sarah Jane, Mary Ermaline, Grisella, and Prudence Manning. Their female descendants will have the mtDNA that would show Native American ancestry if Minerva were, in fact, Cherokee.

I’ll continue research for the descendants of Minerva and see if any of them are interested in testing, but as things sit currently, I am confident that Minerva was not Native American.

Eliza Jane Fannin (1861-1882)

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 25 – Eliza Jane Fannin (1861-1882)

Sometimes it is necessary to go back to the drawing board.
My records on my 2nd great-grandparents are abysmal.  I have a couple documents.  One is a paragraph titled, “Family History” and in the corner is written “oral history.”
Of course, it doesn’t have anything about who said it or when.  It is fairly old, it might go back to the 1970s, probably the 1980’s, although I’m not sure.  The second document
is is a copy of a sheet titled “Family History Carter County – KY. “
It is more of a chart than prose about the family.  I don’t know where it came from either but I think it probably came from about the same time.  Maybe it will become evident when I go back though all of the resources that I have on Joe (John) Mannin, his wife Eliza
Jane Fannin, and the rest of the Mannin clan.

From “Family History”

“Joe (John) Mannin (one-half Cherokee) & Eliza Jane Fannin Parents of Phebe Mannin (Brown) (Richmond) (Upton).  Charlie Mannin brother of Joe fought opposite of Joe in the Civil war, Joe Conferate [sic] & Charlie Union. Joe Mannin’s parents were Enoch Mannin & Minerva Tolliver (full Cherokee). Nancy Ann Mannin (Joe’s sister) married Jesse Monroe Barnett. Jesse’s son Enoch married Elizabeth Warner & are Zachariah Barnett’s parents. Zackariah married Estella (Brown) Barnett. Jesse Monroe
Barnett was a drummer boy in the civil war & run alongside Lincoln’s horse at Gettysburg & played his drum. Mary Jones was Joe Mannin’s sister and raised Phebe Mannin from a baby as her mother died when she was born.
(Enoch Barnett disappeared when Zachariah was 15, we went to northern Minnesota
to work in the logging camps & never came home.)”

[Note: I’ve added punctuation where appropriate.]

There are a number of bits of information in this document that I am sure are not true.  Once you find one certain error the rest become questionable.  We know that Joe (John) William Mannin, the son of Enoch Mannin, fought for the Union. 

The National Archives has a wonderful record that I found through Fold 3 [i] that is John William Mannin’s Volunteer Enlistment. What is really great about the document is that John was only 17 years old when he enlisted and his father, Enoch, gave his consent.  The names, places,  and dates are all spot on. Enoch also enlisted on the same date. 

Discover yourself at 23andMeSimilarly, this record states that his mother Minerva was full Cherokee. As descendants of hers, I would expect my mother to have some portion of Native American blood. All things being equal I would expect my mother to be about 1/16th (6.5%)Native American.  An autosomal DNA Test from 23 & Me indicated that that she is 99.8% European. 

Now, I know that because of the “stickiness” of DNA through the
generations it is fairly possible that the Native American segments were
lost.  However,  none of the cousins (descended from Minerva) I have been in contact with that have had DNA testing with have any Native American either. Because of this, I find that Minerva being full Cherokee as being native unlikely. Additionally, Minerva is never reported in any of the Census reports as being “Indian.”  Finally, I have not been able to find a Charlie Mannin as a brother of Joe in any of the census reports or other
documents.  Possibly “Charlie” was a cousin or other relative and was considered like “a brother.”

 

Much of the other material is accurate, but because I know several of the “facts” are incorrect, I am loathe to accept any of it.

The other document I have regarding “Family History Carter County – KY” is easy to read. It says:

Family History

Carter County – KY

 (Joe) John W. Mannin (1/2 Cherokee) Aunt Mary Brown, Eliza Jane Fannin Phebe Jane Uptons Parents sold their land to Charlie Mannin brother of John after Civil War. They fought on opposite sides
according to Victoria Brown’s letter to Lila Cole.  (John for South)

Enoch Mannin – John (Joe’s) father  }  Phebe Uptons

Minerva Tolliver – Full Cherokee    }  Grandparents

Nancy Ann Mannin Barnett – Sister to (Joe) John – Phebe’s Father

Married Jesse Monroe Burnett (Drummer boy for North in Civil War)

Elizabeth Warner Barnett (Her mother was a Horn) Father Zachariah Warner

Married

Enoch Mannin
Barnett         – Jessie Monroe’s son

Nancy Ann’s son

 

Aunt Mary & Tommy
Jones Raised Phebe from a small baby as her mother died at her birth

Aunt Mary Jones
later married George Gates

Aunt Mary Jones
and John (Joe) Mannin  (Phebe’s father)
were Brother & sister.

It is fairly clear that this
document and the other document had different authors, however, both documents
contain some of the same information. What this does do is solidify what we
believe to be family history (oral).  I
have little doubt the family believed Joe (John) fought for the South and that
they believed that Minerva was Cherokee.
I have about an inch of materials,
documents, that I need to go through (including a transcript of the letter from
Victoria Brown), catalog the sources where I can, and incorporate the
information into my tree. We will see if anything about John and Eliza becomes clarified as wade through the information.So, here is what I think I know about Eliza Jane Fannin.

Bio Eliza Jane Fannin

She was born about 1861 in
Kentucky.[ii]
She married John Mannin probably
about 1875,
She had two children, Mary
Elizabeth was born in 1876, although it could have been 1877.
In 1880 she lived in Pine Grove, Rowan
County, Kentucky with her husband and daughter Mary.[iii] [Note: Rowan and Carter counties adjoin.]
She died December 1881 or December
1882, probably in Carter County Kentucky, giving birth to her second child
Phebe.

Although I know very little about my 2nd great grandmother, Eliza Jane Fannin.List of Greats

Mary Elizabeth Manning
Eliza Jane Fannin

 

———- DISCLAIMER ———-

 

I am sorry that I messed writing
about David Swayze (Week 23) and Marion Sanford (Week 24). Due to my moving
from Georgia to Maine and due to a computer hard disk crash (which left me
computerless for 27 days), I was unable to write the past two weeks. I hope to be able to catch back up with them later.
Next week I plan to write about
Rufus Harry Darling, my wife’s great grandfather.

 


 

[i] www.fold3.com/image/#232425255
NARA M397. Compiled service records of volunteer Union soldiers who served in
organizations…
[ii] 1880 Census – Place: Pine Grove, Rowan, Kentucky; Roll: 441; Family History Film: 1254441;
Page: 453B; Enumeration District: 114; Image: 0110
[iii]
ibid.