Biography – Enoch Mannin (1823-1907)

Roberts-Brown-2017 Research
Brown/Mannin Line
Ancestor #52

By Don Taylor

Enoch Mannin is one of my “go to” ancestors.  That is to say that if I find a new database or website I ask myself, should I find something about Enoch on that site?  It is also a person that I search for on a system I know little about.  Will Enoch be there? Enoch lived a really full life, he was born in Kentucky, he fought for the Union during the civil war. After the war, he migrated to Minnesota and homesteaded land there. So, there are many placed and records that mention him. Also, his name is helpful because is helps me understand the search criteria needed to be used. Are Mannin and Manning the same – Are Mannon and Mannan also included in the same search or do I need to use wildcards.

I think having a person whose life you know a lot about, so you can differentiate him from other people with the same or a similar name, and is a person that appears in many records helps to clarify a collection. For me, Enoch Mannin is that guy.  Do you have such a person in your tree that you can always “go to”?

List of Grandparents

  • Grand Parent: Richard Earl Brown
  • 1st Great: Mary Elizabeth Manning
  • 2nd Great: John William Manning
  • 3rd Great: Enoch Mannin[i]
  • 4th Great: Meredith Mannin
  • 5th Great: John Bosel Mannin*
  • 6th Great: Samuel Mannin*
  • 7th Great: Meredith Mannin*

*Parentage unconfirmed but believed to be correct.

Enoch Mannin (1823-1907)

Photo of Enoch Mannin
Enoch Mannin

Enoch Mannin was born on 03 Jan 1823[ii] in Owingsville, Bath County, Kentucky. He was the first child of twelve children born to Meredith Mannin and Rachel (Fugate) Mannin.

Childhood

Enoch appears to have gained a kind of wanderlust while a child. He and his brothers, Isaac and Thomas, were born in Kentucky, presumably Bath county but the family didn’t stay there long.

About 1829 the family moved to Missouri. The 1830 Census finds the Meredith Manning family, with four boys, the three born in Kentucky and one, Tubill, was born in Missouri. They were living in St. Ferdinand, St. Louis, Missouri.[iii] St. Ferdinand is an area of Saint Louis just north of the city much of which is in the flood plain where the Missouri and Mississippi rivers meet. Siblings Reuben and Katherine were also born in Missouri in 1831 and 1833 respectively.

About 1835, the family moved to Indiana, where siblings John, Mahala, Elizabeth, and Sarah Jane were born. The 1840 Census finds the family in Boone County, Indiana.[iv] Oddly enough, one child appears to be missing from the 1840 Census. At the time, they should have had two boys from 10 to under 15 in the household, Thomas (age 13) and Tubill (age 10). However, the census shows only one male child in that age range.  I don’t know if one of them was just missed in the census or if one of them was elsewhere.  Both do appear in subsequent records.  All other children appear to be present in the 1840 census records.

About 1841, the family moved to Carter County, Kentucky.  There his two youngest siblings Zachariah in 1841 and Tarlton in 1842 were born.

So, it seems that Enoch’s wanderlust was developed as a child; he lived in at least four different locations in three states while he was growing up.

Marriage

When he was 20, he married Minerva Ann Tolliver, daughter of Tulion Tolliver and Martha Mannin, on 15 Oct 1843 in Grayson, Carter County, Kentucky. The ceremony was performed by Joseph Nichols who appears to have had a “Christian Church” in Morgan County.

Enoch and Minerva had nine children. They were:

  1. Charlie was probably born circa 1844 and died about 1850.
  2. John William Manning: born between 1845-1846 in Kentucky. He died on 25 Apr 1888 in Carter County, Kentucky. He married Elisa Jane Fannin before 1880 in Kentucky.
  3. Isaac Wilson Mannin was born between 1845-1846 in Kentucky (Probably Owingsville, Bath County). He died on 01 Nov 1931 in Yakima, Yakima County, Washington. He married Hattie T. [Unknown] in 1868 in Kentucky.
  4. Nancy Ann Mannin was born in Mar 1849 in Kentucky (She was age 10/12 during the 1850 Census). She died on 02 Feb 1913 in Ogema, Saskatchewan, Canada. She married Jessie Monroe Barnett on 22 Jan 1867 in Carter County, Kentucky.
  5. Meredith Mannin was born between 1850-1851 in Kentucky.
  6. Sarah Jane Mannin was born between 1854-1855 in Kentucky (Probably Owingsville, Bath County7). She died on 28 Jan 1942 in Medical Lake, Spokane, Washington14 (At age 88 & 4 Months). She married Joseph Hatfield Bryant in 1869 in Kentucky.
  7. Mary Ermaline Mannin was born between 1855-1856 in Kentucky. She died after 1899. She married was married twice.

She married Thomas N Jones on 17 May 1875 in Cass, Minnesota.
She married again to George Washington Gates in 1899 in Cass, Minnesota.

  1. Gresella Mannin was born between 1856-1857 in Kentucky. She died in 1897 in Bemidji, Beltrami, Minnesota.
  2. Prudence Mannin was born between 1859-1860 in Kentucky. She died after Jul 1898. She married a McDonald on 12 May 1877 in Olive Hill, Carter, Kentucky.

Adult

The 1850 Census indicates Enoch is living in Bath County, Kentucky working as a laborer. He has a modest amount of real estate (valued at $50). He cannot read and write – a capability he doesn’t appear to ever achieve.  With him in the census records are his wife Minerva, and three children, John W, Isaac, and Nancy A.[v]

The 1860 Census indicates Enoch is still living in Bath County, Kentucky. He is a farmer whose real estate value is only $25. His personal property is $80. Living with him are his wife and six children, presumably all his and Minerva’s.[vi]  they were

  • William (John William), age 15, who was working as a farm hand.
  • Isaac, age 12
  • Nancy, age 10
  • Sarah, age 5
  • Emaline, age 4
  • Grasella, age 3

All were born in Kentucky.

The Civil War

The civil war broke out in April 1861 when the Confederates attacked Fort Sumter.  However, the war built up slowly as more and more men volunteered to serve in the Confederate and Union Armies. In April 1862, the Confederates enabled conscription (a draft). In July 1962, the Union also enabled conscription when a state couldn’t meet its quota with volunteers. Because Enoch was over 35, he probably would have never been drafted, but he did volunteer to serve on 29 Aug 1863. On that same day, he signed a parental consent for his son, and my 2nd great-grandfather, John W. Mannin to enlist early.  John was only 17, but he was to turn 18 in the next couple months. Also, enlisting on the same day at Olive Hill with Enoch and John W. was a John N. Mannin. I have not determined the relationship between John N. and John W. or Enoch Mannin, yet, but their simultaneous enlistment cannot be a coincidence.

When Enoch enlisted, he was 40-years-old, however, he reported his age as 44. I don’t know if there was some sort of advantage to being older in his enlistment or not. He was 5’6” tall, had black hair and black eyes.[vii]

He mustered in at Grayson, Carter County, Kentucky on 28 September 1863. He serviced with Company E, 40th Kentucky Volunteer Mounted Infantry. I have not had a chance to follow the action of the 40th. KY Vol, Mounted Inf. yet.

I do know that he was captured by Morgan in 1864 and was finally released.[viii]

He mustered out at Catlettsburg, Boyd County, Kentucky on 30 December 1864.[ix]

After the War

The 1870 Census found Enoch living near Grayson, in Carter County, Kentucky, as a farmer. His real estate value had risen to $250 and his personal property was now $350. Living with him is his wife, Minerva, and four children, Meredith (age 19), Mary (age 16), Gazella (age 13), and Prudence (age 10). All of the children had attended school in the past year.[x]

The 1880 Census finds Enoch and Minerva still together, however, living with them are his son Isaac, Isaac’s wife Tennessee, and five of their children, Samuel, Henry, Frances, James, and Phodeence (?).[xi]

The Move North

Key places in Enoch Mannin's Life
Key places in Enoch Mannin’s Life

In the fall of 1882, Enoch led a group of 9 families from Kentucky to Minnesota. Besides he and his wife Minerva, there were 8 other families.[xii]

  1. His daughter Sarah Jane and her husband Joseph Bryant
  2. His daughter Nancy A. and her husband, Jesse Barnett.
  3. His daughter Mary E. and her husband, Thomas Jones.
  4. His son Isaac and his wife, Hattie.
  5. His grandson, John T. Bryant and his wife Mary (Son of Sarah Jane)
  6. His cousin, Joseph Fugate and his wife Eliza.
  7. The nephew of his son-in-law (Joseph), Squire Bryant and his wife Elizabeth.
  8. Finally, a friend and neighbor, John W. and Mary Horn.

And, of course, all their children.  I can only imagine the difficulties they faced on the long, 900-mile, trip from Grayson, Kentucky up to Holding Township, Stearns County Minnesota during the winter.  They arrived in February[xiii] and immediately set up households.

The 1885 Census is somewhat confusing.  Some oral history indicates that Phoebe Manning was raised by her aunt and uncle Mary E. (Mannin) and Thomas W. Jones and her sister Mary Manning was raised by their father, John William Manning.  Other oral history indicates that both Mary and Phoebe Manning were raised by Tommy and Mary E. Jones. In either event, both Mary and Phoebe, along with their older brother Robert, are all living with grandparents Enoch and Minerva Mannin in near Saint Anna in Holding Township, Stearns County, Minnesota.  Tomas and Mary Jones were also living in Holding Township, Stearns Count, Minnesota.[xiv] So, it is confusing when Mary and Phoebe lived with Tom and Mary Jones and when they lived with Enoch and Minerva. If any cousins can shed some light on this topic, I’d love to hear.

The Final Move

Map of Mannin Homesteads in Csss County
Mannin’s in Section 22 & 26, Township 134, Cass County, Minnesota

In the winter of 1887-1888, Enoch and several of the other families moved again – This time to Township 134 (May Township), Cass County, Minnesota.[xv] They began homesteading properties there. In February 1894, Enoch received a patent for 160 acres of land – The NE Quarter of Section 22 in township 134 North (later known as May Township) of Range 31 West of the Fifth Principal Meridian in Minnesota.[xvi]

John William Manning (Enoch’s oldest son and Mary and Phoebe’s father) died in April of 1888. By all oral accounts, the two children lived with the Jones’ after that.  Oral history from Mary Manning said that Enoch was very strict and stern. Apparently, getting out from under Enoch’s rule was enough motivation to marry young, very young. Mary married Arthur Durwood Brown on 19 October 1891 when she was only 13 years old. Phoebe apparently toughed it out longer

The 1895 Minnesota Census shows Enoch living in Township 134 (May Township), Cass County Minnesota with his wife Minova [Minerva]. In the same household is his grandson, Robert J. Mannin with his wife, Martha J, and two of their children, Perly and Ernest.[xvii]

The 1900 Census finds Enoch and Minerva still living in living in Township 134. The census confirms Enoch was born in January 1823 and that Minerva was born in February. It has an error in Minerva’s birth year indicating 1881 rather than 1821, but the mistake is clear as her age is 78 years old. The two had been married 57 years. Minerva had had nine children, five of whom were still living.[xviii]  All nine have been accounted for.

  • Dead – Charlie Mannin died c. 1850
  • Dead – John William died in 1888
  • Dead – Gresella died in 1897
  • Alive – Isaac Wilson died 1931.
  • Alive – Nancy Ann died in 1913.
  • Alive – Sarah Jane died in 1942.
  • Alive – Mary Ermaline died in 1941.
  • Alive – Prudence died in 1940.
  • Dead (by deduction) – Meredith must have died before 1900.

On 24 October 1902, Meredith’s wife Minerva died. They had just celebrated their 59th wedding anniversary.

The 1905 Minnesota Census shows the 82-year-old Enoch living alone in May Township[xix].

Death

Marker - Enoch Mannin
Marker – Enoch Mannin

Enoch died on 7 April 1907, in May Township, Cass County, Minnesota.  He is buried in Bridgeman Cemetery, May Township, with a marker showing his Civil War service in Company E, 40th Kentucky Infantry.[xx]

Further Actions / Follow-up

  • I need to follow the Civil War action of the 40th. KY Vol, Mounted Inf.
  • I also need to research the further moves of the nine families. (Some moved to Washington, some to Canada, others to Oregon.)

 Photos

Do you have a photo of Enoch Manning, his siblings or his children?  If so, I’d be very interested in getting a digital copy of it.  Please contact me using the comment form below.

– – – – – – – – – – – –Disclaimer – – – – – – – – – – – – –

DNA

Are we related?  If we share Enoch Mannin as our first common ancestor then we are probably fourth cousins. Fourth cousins is about the limit that autosomal DNA can reliably match individuals. If you have a nice, we defined, tree I highly recommend DNA Testing through Ancestry.Com. If your tree has gaps, adoptions, or unknown paternal events, I highly recommend Family Tree DNA. If you haven’t tested, please use one of the links below to order your test. Contact me using the form below if you have any questions. I find it fun to genetically identify new cousins. Hopefully, you will too. [xxi]

 

Family Tree DNA - Family Finder & Population Finder


Endnotes

[i] Mannin, Manning, Mannen, and Mannon are used interchangeably in various documents. My tendency is to use the variation used in the source/document I am citing from, however, occasionally I will use my preferred spelling regardless of the document.

[ii] Mannin Family Bible, Copy, Mannin Family Bible – Family Records – Births.

[iii] 1830 Census (A) (NARA), Ancestry.Com, 1830 Census – Meredith Manning – St Ferdinand. St Louis County, Missouri.

[iv] 1840 Census (A) (NARA), Ancestry.Com, Year: 1840; Census Place: Boone, Indiana; Roll: 74; Page: 138.

[v] 1850 Census (A), Ancestry.Com, Enoch Mannan – Division 2, Bath, Kentucky – Page 71, Family 486 – Line 26. Source Citation: Year: 1850; Census Place: Division 2, Bath, Kentucky; Roll M432_191; Page: 36A; Image: 453.

Accessed 4/25/2010.  http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?h=16880200&db=1850usfedcenancestry&indiv=1

[vi] 1860 Census (A) (NARA), Ancestry.Com, 1860 Census – Enoch Manning – Owingsville, Bath, Kentucky – Page 234. Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: , Bath, Kentucky; Roll M653_355; Page: 234; Image: 234; Family History Library Film: 803355. http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?h=39181328&db=1860usfedcenancestry&indiv=1

[vii] Enlistment Papers – Enoch Mannin – 29 Aug 1863 http://dontaylorgenealogy.com/2017/01/enlistment-papers-enoch-mannin-29-aug-1863.html/

[viii] http://dontaylorgenealogy.com/2015/11/veterans-day-2015.html/

[ix] Adjutant General’s Report, PAGE 432 – Company E, 40th KY Vol Mounted Infantry. ROLL OF COMPANY “E,” FORTIETH KENTUCKY VOLUNTEER MOUNTED INFANTRY.

[x] 1870 Census (A) (NARA), Ancestry.Com, 1870 Census – Enock Mannon – Grayson, Carter, Kentucky – Page 10. Year: 1870; Census Place: Precinct 4, Carter, Kentucky; Roll M593_454; Page: 131B; Image: 266; Family History Library Film: 545953. http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?h=17854241&db=1870usfedcen&indiv=1.

[xi] 1880 Census (A) (NARA), Ancestry.Com, 1880 Census – Enoch Mannin – Precinct 4, Carter, Kentucky – ED 15, Page 20. Year: 1880; Census Place: Precinct 4, Carter, Kentucky; Roll T9_408; Family History Film: 1254408; Page: 547.4000; Enumeration District: 15; Image: 0374. http://search.ancestry.com/cgi– bin/sse.dll?h=41986895&db=1880usfedcen&indiv=1.

[xii] e-mail, 2016-11-18 – Attachment “Bryant & Mannin Information” ., Email from B. (H.) Jones to Don Taylor – privately held.

[xiii] 1895 Minnesota Census (State of Minnesota), Ancestry.Com, 1895 Minnesota Census – Enock Mannie [Enoch Mannin] – Township 134, Cass, Minnesota – Page 19.

[xiv] 1885 Minnesota Census, Ancestry.Com, 1885 Minnesota Census – Enoch Mannin – Holding, Stearns County, Minnesota – Page 3, Line 30, Family 21.

[xv] 1895 Minnesota Census (State of Minnesota), Ancestry.Com, 1895 Minnesota Census – Enock Mannie [Enoch Mannin] – Township 134, Cass, Minnesota – Page 19

[xvi] General Land Office Records (U.S. Department of the Interior), Bureau of Land Management, Enoch Mannin – Homestead Certificate No. 8277, Application 14821. https://glorecords.blm.gov/details/patent/default.aspx?accession=MN2060__.280&docClass=STA&sid=demhmt3w.2lc#patentDetailsTabIndex=1.

[xvii] 1895 Minnesota Census (State of Minnesota), Ancestry.Com, 1895 Minnesota Census – Enock Mannie [Enoch Mannin] – Township 134, Cass, Minnesota – Page 19

[xviii] 1900 Census (A) (NARA), Ancestry.Com, 1900 Census – Enoch Mannin – Cass, Minnesota – Township 134, Range 31 – ED 48, Sheet 5B. Year: 1900; Census Place: Township 134, Cass, Minnesota; Roll T623_759; Page: 5B; Enumeration District: 48. http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?h=26154889&db=1900usfedcen&indiv=1.

[xix] 1905 Minnesota Census, Ancestry.Com, Enoch Mannin (Manner) – May Township, Class County, Minnesota. http://search.ancestry.com/search/collections/MNstatecen/2582361/printer-friendly?ssrc=pt&tid=40083876&pid=19447704566&usePUB=true.

[xx] Find a Grave – Memorial #60388199 – Enoch Mannin – https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=60388199.

[xxi] Note: DNA Testing results sometimes bring to light family relationships that were not previously known. Do not test if you prefer to be blissfully ignorant of the truth.

James Robert Mannin (1867-1937) – Second Great Grand Uncle

James Robert Mannin  (1867-1937) – Second Great Grand Uncle
I don’t know much about my second great grandfather John William Manning. I thought I might learn more by researching his son, my great grandmother’s (Mary Elizabeth Manning Brown) half brother James Robert Manning. I had many questions about “Bobby” as ‘grandma Brown called him. My great-aunt Delores wrote to me in 2005 regarding “uncle Bob” and mentioned he had moved to Washington State with his wife Martha. Uncle Bob had two sons, Grant & Herbert that she knew.[i]
Holding Township is Northwest of Saint Cloud
Saint Anna is in Avon Township just south of
Holding Township. Source: Google Maps
I had seen him in a couple censuses so I knew something of him and his life, but not too much. The earliest place I find a record for him is in the 1885 Minnesota Census[ii]. It shows him, along with is sisters Mary and (Phebe) Jane living near Saint Anna in Holding Township, Stearns County, Minnesota with their grandparents, Enoch and Menorvi (Minerva) Mannan (Mannin).
The 1895 Minnesota Census shows Enock (Enoch) and Minerva Mannin living in Township 134, Cass County, Minnesota. Living with them are Robert, his wife, and their two oldest children, Pearly and Earnest R Mannin[iii]. Neither the 1885 nor the 1895 Minnesota censuses provide relationship information. That is probably why many people associate Robert as being the child of Enoch and Minerva when Robert would be their grandson. That Robert is not Minerva’s child is evidenced by the 1900 Census that indicates Minerva’s had nine children, five of whom were still living[iv]. Her children would have included:

John William – Died in 1888.
Isaac Wilson – Living
in 1900.
Nancy Ann – Living in
1900.
Meredith – Unknown – Presumed dead (No reverences to him
after 1870 Census)
Sarah Jane – Living
in 1900.
Mary Ermaline –
Living in 1900.
Gresella – Died in 1897
Prudence – Living in
1900.
Charlie – Unknown – Presumed dead (No references to him
after the Civil War).

By my logic, Robert could not have been one of Minerva and Enoch’s children. Therefore, there must be an error in the Family Search trees for Robert.


1900 – Had Robert and family still been living with Enoch and Minerva in 1900, the relationship would have been clearly identified. However, in 1900, Robert shows up as James R Mannin living as a farmer in Township 135, Cass County, Minnesota with is wife, Martha, and children. In 1900, Martha had had four children all of whom were living. They were:

         Pearlie Mannin           Daughter  Born: Mar 1892.
         Ernest R Mannin        Son            Born: Nov 1894
         Minnie Mannin           Daughter  Born: Jul 1897
         Nora M Mannin          Daughter  Born: March 1899

It is important to note that the wife and two eldest children have the same names and respective ages as in the 1895 Minnesota Census. This evidence helps establish that Robert Mannin was known as James R Mannin in 1900. We will also see that Robert James Mannin and James Robert Mannin, and parts thereof are used interchangeably throughout the years. In addition, Mannin and Manning are used interchangeably.

The 1905 Minnesota Census shows James R Mannin still in May Township, Cass County, Minnesota. He had been in the state for 21 years and in the enumeration district for 6 months. With him are is wife Martha and six children:[v]

Pearle age 13
Ernest R age 10
Minnie age 7
Nora M age 5
Clara age 4
Herbert age 1

The 1910 Census finds Robert J Mannin living in May Township, Cass County, Minnesota. Living with him are his wife and six children. It is interesting to note that Ernest R is E. Raymond in this census.[vi].

The 1920 Census find James Mannin with his wife Martha, his son Herbert, and another son, Frank (aged 7) still living in May Township. Also living with them is their daughter Nora, her husband Elde Wagner, and their son Arthur[vii].

James Mannin, Head, Owns Mortgaged, M, W, 53, M, Read, Write, Born Kentucky, Farmer, General Farm, Own Account
Martha Mannin, Wife, F, W, 49, M, read, write, Kentucky, 
Herbert Mannin, Son, M, W, 15, S, attended school, Minnesota 
Frank Mannin, Son, M, W, 7 4/12, S, Attended school, Minnesota
Elde Wagner, Son Law, M, W, 26, M, read, write, Minnesota, both parents Wisconsin, Farm Laborer, Working Out for wage.
Nora Wagner, Daughter, F, W, 20, M, read write, Minnesota, 
Arthur Wagner, Grandson, M, W, 1-9/12, Minnesota

1930 – Sometime between 1920 and 1930, James Robert Mannin and family moved to Yakama, Washington where they are found in the 1930 Census[viii]. With James Robert are his wife Martha and his youngest son, 17 year-old Grant. I believe that Frank and Grant are the same child; however, I am unable to confirm/validate that assertion so far.

Then on Rootsweb I was able to find “Davis Family of England, Ohio & Minnesota & McGuire family of Virginia, Kentucky & Minnesota[ix]” which included James Robert Mannin and his pedigree. It says he died on 22 Dec 1937 in Yakima, Washington. It provided his mother’s name of Evelyn Brynard and his wife’s maiden name as Martha Jane McGuire. I don’t accept these as new facts, yet; however, I do accept them as clues for further research.

Actions:

Open a discussion on Family Search to move Robert under John William and make him a grandson to Enoch, not a son.
 Continue researching James Robert Mannin’s parentage (particularly sources for his mother Evelyn Brynard)
 Research James Robert Mannin’s wife, Martha Jane McGuire. 

Endnotes:

[i] Various, Letters, Don Taylor, Maine, Letter – Delores Brown Pribbenow – 2005-04-04. I Delores Sarah Pribbenow. http://dontaylorgenealogy.com/2014/11/letter-of-delores-sarah-brown-pribbenow.html/.
[ii] 1885 Minnesota, Territorial and State Census, Ancestry.com, 1885 – Holding, Stearns County, Minnesota – Page 3 (Post Office: Saint Anna).
[iii] 1895 Minnesota Census, Ancestry.com, 1895 Residence place:  Township 134.
[iv] 1900 Census (National Archives and Records Administration), Ancestry.com, 1900 Census; Minnesota, Cass, Township 134, District 0048 Sheet 5.
[v] 1905 Minnesota State Census, Family Search, James R Mannin, May township, Cass, Minnesota; citing p. 1, line 17, State Library and Records Service, St.Paul; FHL microfilm 928,772. : accessed 20 November 2015). https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:SPSF-L9Q.
[vi] 1910 Census (NARA), Ancestry.com, Year: 1910; Census Place: May, Cass, Minnesota; Roll: T624_693; Page: 9A; Enumeration District: 0013; FHL microfilm: 1374706. Record for Robert J Mannin.
[vii] 1920 Census, Ancestry.com, James Mannin – 1920; Census Place: May, Cass, Minnesota; Roll: T625_824; Page: 8B;Enumeration District: 94; Image: 811, Line 51. http://search.ancestry.com//cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1920usfedcen&indiv=try&h=26517460.
[viii] 1930 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com, 1930; Census Place: Zillah, Yakima, Washington; Roll: 2524; Page: 4B; Enumeration District: 0047; Image: 796.0; FHL microfilm: 2342258.
[ix] Leslie Mikesell Wood, Davis Family of England, Ohio & Minnesota & McGuire family of Virginia, Kentucky & Minnesota (, 2011-04-21), Rootsweb.ancestry.com, ID: I156 – James Robert Mannin. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=mcguiredavis&id=I156.
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Mary Elizabeth Manning [Brown] (1878-1983)

By – Don Taylor

We know that often as a person ages their birth date
changes. Women often get younger during their adult years and then get older in
their latter years.  Mary Elizabeth (Manning) Brown was just such a woman. 

Birth
Year
Year
Source
1878
1880
Census
1879
1900
Census
1877
1910
Census
1880
1920
Census
1877
1930
Census
1877
1940
Census
1878
1965
Social Security Death Index
1876
1983
MN
Death Index
1876
1983
Marker
1876
c.
1984
Notes
of Mary’s daughter, Victoria Quelland
1878
2001
Notes
from Mary’s minister, Les Crider
1876
2005
Letter
from Mary’s daughter, Delores Pribbenow
Only three of the many documents I have indicate the birth
year I prefer, 1878, The 1880 Census is probably the most accurate; it is the
only document I have found where the data was provided by someone who was at
her birth (presumably one of her parents). 
It is corroborated by her Social Security application.  None of the records before the 1970s indicate
her birth year as 1876, the year for which she celebrated her 100th
birthday in 1976.
Going through all of the birthdates for an individual is
important. When there is a discrepancy in dates, it is important to analyze all
of the dates and determine which is likely the most accurate.

Bio – Mary Elizabeth Manning [Brown] (1878-1983)

Mary Brown

Childhood

Mary Elizabeth Manning was born on April 17, 1878, the
oldest child of John William and Elisa Jane (Fannin) Manning in rural Kentucky.
One source indicates she was born in Kernsville, Carter County, however, I
haven’t been able to find a Kernsville in Kentucky. 
The 1880 Census shows Mary living with her parents near Pine
Grove, Rowan County, Kentucky. Her sister, Phoebe, was born in January 1881.
Again, I’m not certain where, but probably either Carter County or Rowan
County. Mary’s father, John, did have another child, Robert Manning, with
another (name unknown) woman. Robert was 9 years older than Mary was. I need to
do much more research in this area. In December 1882, Mary’s mother, Eliza,
died. Oral history indicates that she died in childbirth.
There is a lot of confusion about what happened to Robert,
Mary, and Phoebe after their mother died. One story line is that Mary &
Phoebe lived with their aunt & uncle, Thomas & Mary Jones.  Another story line is that they lived for a
time with their aunt & uncle, Joe & Sarah Bryant. I know for sure that they also lived with
their grandparents, Enoch and Minerva Manning in Holding, Stearns County,
Minnesota in 1885[1].  We know that the three children’s father also
died when they were young. Family history says he was poisoned so someone could
steal money from him. One researcher indicated that John William died in 1888.
If he died so much later then it wouldn’t make as much sense as to why the
three children were living with their grandparents in June 1885. 
In
1888, Enoch moved to Cass County, Minnesota. It is unclear if that is when the
children went to live with the Joneses, the Bryants, or stayed with Enoch. 

The Child Bearing Years

Arthur Durwood & Mary Elizabeth
(Manning) Brown [date unknown]

Family oral history says that Enoch was a harsh man, so it is easy to understand why young Mary wanted to get away from him. According to Les Crider’s records, Mary married Arthur
Durwood Brown on 19 October 1892, when she was but 14 years old. This year is
confirmed by both the 1900 and 1910 Censuses. Most of the next thirty years of
her life she spent pregnant or nursing.

First was Clyde Leroy who was born 1894 in Sylvan Township,
Cass County, Minnesota.
Then the young couple moved to North Dakota. I recall Mary
telling me that they traveled to North Dakota by oxen and wagon.  I don’t know if it was this time or one of
the other times they moved as they switched between North Dakota and Minnesota
several times.
Victoria Cecelia was their first child born in North Dakota;
she was born in 1896.
They moved back to Minnesota where Clarence Arthur was born
in 1897.
The 1900 Census indicates that Mary had had four children,
three of whom were living.  That gives
rise to an unknown child probably being born in 1899 who died before 2 June
1900[2].
Cora Elsie was born in Pequot Lakes, Crow Wing, Minnesota,
in 1901.
My grandfather, Clifford Durwood Brown, was born in Robinson,
Kidder County, ND, in 1903, three days before the famous flight of the Wright
Brothers.
Two more children, Martin and Dorothy, were born between
1904 and 1907. They both died of measles before 1910.
Edward Lewis was born in North Dakota in July 1908.
Arthur Eugene was born in North Dakota in in 1909.
Charles William was the last of the children born in North
Dakota in 1914.
The family moved back to Minnesota where Delores Sarah was
born in Sylvan Township in 1917 and Nettie Mae Viola born in Pillager in 1921.

The Middle Years

In 1928, Mary’s husband of 36 years died. Mary was 50 years
old when Arthur died.  Who would have
guessed that Mary hadn’t lived half of her life at that point?
The 1930 Census shows Mary living with her three youngest
children in Fairview, Cass County, Minnesota. Nearby is her son Edward with his
new wife Mary[3].
Cora, Nettie, Delores, Arthur, and Clarence were all married
in the ensuing ten years and began having many children.  Grandchildren, and great-grandchildren were
being born frequently. Her son, Clifford had a child out of wedlock. He
illegally took custody of the child and brought her to Minnesota to be raised
by his mother and himself. He was arrested and went to prison in Illinois for
child-napping. When he got out of prison, he changed his name to Richard Earl
Durand. Some years later Richard would return to Minnesota and change his name once
again, this time to Richard (Dick) Earl Brown.
The 1940 Census shows Mary living as hired help in May
Township with Isaac Reynolds. Isaac was the local postmaster[4]

The Motley Years

Five Generation Photo
Mary Brown, Clyde Brown, Granddaughter Marie,
great granddaughter Yvonne (on far right), &
GG Granddaughter Yvonne (on Mary’s lap) – Dec 1961

Shortly afterwards (before 1943), Mary moved to Motley and
lived a very quiet life.  Apparently,
also in the 1940s her son Dick came to live in the same house. In September
1961, she became a great-great grandmother with the birth of Yvonne Marie [living].

 I remember visiting
Grandpa Dick and “Ma Brown” many times in the late 1950s and 1960s. On one
occasion, Grandpa Dick had just bought a new $50 clunker automobile.  Mary was upset with him spending money on the
car and admonished the universe with a quote I will forever remember.  “Those crazy kids and their motor cars –
cars, cars, cars, that all they think about.” She was calling my grandfather a
“crazy kid.”  He was probably about 60 at
the time and still a kid. It is all about perspective. He may have been 60 but
she was about 85 at the time and from her perspective, he was a kid.
Ma Brown was an amazing cook. She had separate cast iron
pans for fowl, beef, and venison. She made a rhubarb sauce that was amazing. We
just called it “sauce” and everyone knew which sauce we meant.  I always think of her when I see strawberry
rhubarb pie because none I’ve ever eaten since compare to her pies.  I have a pencil sharpener on my desk that
looks like a hand water pump.  It reminds
me every day about Ma Brown and her life in Motley.  In her kitchen was a hand pump, their only
source of water until into the mid 1960s. They had an outhouse that was a cool
visit in November and December. We never visited in January, so I can only
imagine – outhouse – January – Minnesota – Burrrr.  Along side the Motley house Mary kept a huge
garden – probably most of a house lot in size. She maintained it well into her late
80s, probably into her 90s.

Mary’s later years

Sadly, I think the last time I saw Mary was in 1965 or
so.  As a teenager, I didn’t have the
inclination to visit “up north.” I went into the service in 1969 and didn’t see
Mary at all during the ensuing years, although I did visit Grandpa Dick a few
times in 1970s but he was in Motley and Mary was at the Bethany Good Samaritan
Center in Brainerd.  Not visiting her in
Brainerd is something I regret not having done.
In 1976, that Mary Elizabeth Brown celebrated her 100th
birthday.  I believe it was a couple
years premature, but that is okay.  Her
celebrations continued for another seven years. She died on 8 May 1983 at the
age of 105 at the Bethany Home in Brainerd, Minnesota.
Mary E. Brown
1876 Mother 1983

She is buried at Gull River Cemetery, Pillager, Minnesota,
near her husband Arthur who died fifty-five years earlier.

Conclusion

Mary had an amazing life. She was orphaned young; she was
married young. She had 13 children and raised 10 of them to adulthood. She
lived a life without conveniences, not getting indoor plumbing until the 1960s.
She was very active in her church. In her Motley years, she cooked and canned
from her garden and prepared the game her son brought home.

There are many of Mary’s grandchildren still alive.  I would love it if they, their children, or
anyone with first-hand memories of Mary, would use the comments below to add to
the stories of their experiences with Mary Elizabeth (Manning) Brown. 
Further Actions:
Learn more about Robert Manning
Find out more about Kernsville, KY
List of Greats
1.    Mary
Elizabeth Manning [Brown] (1878-1983)
2.    
John William
Manning (1846-c.1888)
3.    
Enoch Mannin
(1823-1907)
4.    
Meridith
Mannin (1802-1885)
5.    
John Bosel
Mannin Sr. (b. 1776 in Virginia)
6.    
Samuel
Mannin  (b. abt 1756)
7.    
Meredith
Mannin (b. Abt. 1720)

[1] 1885 Minnesota,
Territorial and State Census, Ancestry.com,
1885 – Holding,
Stearns County, Minn – Page 3 (Post Office: Saint Anna).
[2] 1900 Census, Ancestry.com, 1900; Census Place: Township 136, Crow Wing,
Minnesota; Roll: 761; Page: 2A; Enumeration
District: 0069; FHL microfilm: 1240761.
[3] United States of
America, Bureau of the Census. Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930.
Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1930. T626,),
Year: 1930; Census Place: Fairview, Cass, Minnesota;
[4] 1940 Census, Ancestry.com, Year: 1940; Census Place: May, Cass, Minnesota; Roll: T627_1912; Page: 10A;
Enumeration District: 11-33.

DNA, the X Chromosome & Minerva Tolliver Manning

For many years, I have been hearing the stories that my 3rd Great Grandmother, Minerva Tolliver Manning was “Full-Blooded Cherokee.” I’ve never believed it and have written about the possibility of Minerva being Native American a few times before. Please see:


Ever being the skeptic, I considered that my grandmother had really gotten pregnant from a different man other than whom she said was the father. She was apparently estranged from her husband at the time of her pregnancy and anything is possible. (She never suggested that her husband was the father.) If the man she always said was the father actually was, then my mother’s half-sister will show the same genetic information on their X-chromosome.

My half-aunt was tested and sure enough, they are half sisters, which we expected. What is really cool is that for a person’s 22 chromosomes they are a mix of each of their parents, however, for the 23rd chromosome, the XX, a girl receives one X from their mother and one X from their father. The mother’s X is a blend of her parents but the father’s contribution is passed on with little to no change. That means that if two girls share the same father then one of the X chromosomes is identical between the two girls. My mother and my half-aunt share one X exactly, so we know, beyond any doubt, they share the same father.

Person
Name
% contribution atDNA
% cont. of X Chromosome
Individual
Mom & Half Aunt
100%
100%
Father
Clifford/Dick
50%
100%
Grandmother
Mary Manning
25%
50%
Great-grandfather
John W. Manning
12.5%
50%
2nd Great-Grandmother
Minerva Tolliver
6.25%
25%
3rd Great-Grandfather
Tulion Tolliver
3.125%
12.5%
As you can see from
the above table, a person’s 2rd Great-Grandmother provides four
times the contribution to an X chromosome than to the normal atDNA
contribution. If Minerva was full-blooded Cherokee as family history says then,
alternating sex through generations, her 2nd great-granddaughters should
have about 25% Native American contribution. Not there.  According the test results from 23 & Me,
their identical X-chromosome shows no Native American contributions.  
What is very interesting is that although both my mom and my
aunt are over 99% European, there is a .2% Sub-Saharan contribution overall and
it is on the X chromosome.  Looking at
only the shared X chromosome it appears to be between 4% and 6% of the X contribution.
That would be in keeping with a 4th or 5th Great-Grandparent’s
contribution.  If Minerva were ¼ to 1/8th
Sub-Saharan African, she would have had about the right percentage to “pass” as Native
American.  From the DNA evidence that
appears to me to be much more likely of a scenario than for Minerva to have
been Cherokee.
My Mom’s X results
My Aunt’s X results



 

Future Activity
As the saying goes, a mother knows her own children, but fathers can be a surprise. As such, I’m confident that Clifford/Dick was Mary’s child. I am also confident that Enoch and Minerva believed that Mary (and her sister Phoebe) were their granddaughters. Mary and Phoebe were orphaned and Enoch and Minerva raised them for a while.

Although reasonable and likely, there is always a possibility that someone else jumped into the mix. I know next to nothing about Mary’s parents, John William Manning and Eliza Jane Fannin. It is always possible that John William Manning wasn’t Mary’s father. Mary had a half brother, Robert, but we are not certain if he was John’s child or Eliza’s child who took on the surname of Manning. In either event, I don’t believe that line will provide much in the way of proof. Rather, Minerva had five daughters, Nancy Ann, Sarah Jane, Mary Ermaline, Grisella, and Prudence Manning. Their female descendants will have the mtDNA that would show Native American ancestry if Minerva were, in fact, Cherokee.

I’ll continue research for the descendants of Minerva and see if any of them are interested in testing, but as things sit currently, I am confident that Minerva was not Native American.

Veterans Day – 11/11/2013 – The Browns & Others

Veterans Day – 11/11/2013 – The Browns & Others

The Civil War had a dreadful impact upon the Brown and Mannin families.  Enoch Mannin, a Kentucky native, fought for the North as did his son John William Manning,  Other of Enoch’s sons fought for the South making the Civil War one truly of brother fighting brother. 

Enoch Mannin (1823-1971) – Civil War (Union) – Third-Great Grandfather.

US Flag (35 Stars) during Civil War.
Enoch enrolled as a Private in Company E, 40th Regiment, Kentucky Mounted Infantry at Grayson, Kentucky, on 29 August 1863 for one year.  He had black eyes, black hair, a dark complexion and 5′ 6″ tall. 
His military record indicates that he was captured by Morgan in May/June 1864. Not sure yet when he was released, but he was discharged when his regiment mustered out of service on 29 December, 1864 at Leattettsburg, KY. 
The 40th Regiment had the following actions:

Scout duty in north central Kentucky until December 1863. 
Actions at Mt. Sterling December 3 and 10, 1863. 
Scouting in eastern Kentucky until May 1864. 
Near Paintsville, Ky., April 14, 1864. 
Operations against Morgan May 31-June 20. 
Mt. Sterling June 9. Cynthiana June 12. 
Duty in eastern Kentucky until September. 
Near New Haven August 2 (Company C). 
Canton and Roaring Springs August 22. 
Burbridge’s Expedition into southwest Virginia September 10-October 17.
Action at Saltville, Va., October 2. 
Duty in eastern Kentucky until December 1864.

Enoch Mannin died on 7 April, 1907. He is buried in Bridgeman Cemetery, Cass County, Minnesota. Please consider leaving virtual flowers and a note on his Find-a-Grave virtual marker.  
– – – – – – – – – – – – –

John William Mannin (aka John William Manning) (1846-1888) – Civil War (Union) – 3rd-Great Grandfather.

US Flag (35 Stars) during Civil War.
John William Mannin (later Manning) enlisted 29 Aug 1863 at Olive Hill, Carter, Kentucky, USA into the 45th Regiment, Kentucky Mounted Infantry at the age of 17. His father, Enoch Mannin, gave his consent to enlist. John William was taller than his father, 5’ 9” tall.  He had blue Eyes, light hair, and a fair complexion. In September mustered into the 40th Infantry Regiment, Kentucky like his father was also in Company E. Like his father, he was captured by Morgan in May/June 1863.  He mustered out on 30 December, 1864 at Catlettsburg, Boyd County, Kentucky.
John William Manning died 25 April, 1888. We do not know where he was buried.


– – – – – – – – – – – – –
Henry Brown (aka William Henry Brown)  (1845-unk) – Civil War (Union) – 2nd-Great Grandfather.
Michigan State Flag
Henry Brown Enlisted as a private into the Union.  It is likely that he is the William Henry Brown that enlisted into 4th Regiment, Michigan Cavalry.  
Of a total force of 2,217 men, 3 officers and 48 enlisted men were killed or mortally wounded in battle, and 2 officers and 341 enlisted men perished from disease for a total loss of almost 1 in 5 (18%) dying during the war.
The 4th Michigan Cavalry was involved in the capture of Macon, Georgia, on April 20, 1865, Subsequently, a detachment of the regiment participated in the pursuit and capture of Jefferson Davis at Irwinville, Georgia, on May 10. 
The 4th was assigned to routine duty at Macon and then at Nashville, Tennessee, until the end of June. The regiment mustered out on July 1, 1865.
William Henry Brown’s death and burial location are unknown, however, he is believed to be buried in North Dakota.
– – – – – – – – – – – – –
Richard Earl Brown (aka Clifford Brown) (aka Richard Earl Durand) (1903-1990) – No War (Army) – Grandfather.
Shoulder insignia for
the 193rd Infantry
Brigade the largest
force in Panama in the
1930s. 
Little is known about Richard Earl’s military service.  We are unsure which name he used in the military and when he actually went in.  We are fairly certain that he served more than six months but did not serve during any declared war.  We know from oral history that he served in the Army and was in Panama when Donna was in Panama sometime before 1932. 
Searches for his military records have not been successful.  
“Dick” is buried at Gull River Cemetery, Cass County, Minnesota. 
Please consider leaving virtual flowers and a note on his Find-a-Grave virtual marker.  


– – – – – – – – – – – – –

The Steps

Although not related directly to me, my “steps” are of interest to my half siblings and my mother’s half brother’s family.
They include two veterans  for whom I have some information.


– – – – – – – – – – – – –

Samson Clark Amsterdam (1898-1979) – World War I and World War II – Step Grandfather.

Sammy is the only individual I have found so far that served in two wars.  
On 21 November, 1917, he enlisted in the Army in Brooklyn, New York.  We know he served at 
Aberdeen Proving Ground, Harford, Maryland and was discharged from there on 23 May, 1919.
On 17 October, 1942, he enlisted in the Army at Lubbock, Texas. He is described as having brown eyes, black hair, a ruddy complexion, and 5 feet two inches tall. 
In August of 1943 he was promoted to sergeant and discharged on 4 November 1944 with the Army speciality of “Entertainment Director.”
Sammy died 16 April, 1979, and is buried at Riverside Cemetery, Macon, Bibb County, 
Georgia.
Please consider leaving virtual flowers and a note on his Find-a-Grave Memorial.  Also, request a photo of his Marker.


– – – – – – – – – – – – –

Edgar Jerome Matson (aka “Bud”) (1925-2003) – World War II – Step-Father

World War II
Recruiting Poster
“Budger” enlisted in the Army on 23 March, 1944. His Serial Number was 37590415. He was reenlisted on 1 Nov 1946 while a Private First Class. He was promoted to SGT US Army prior to his honorable discharge on 2 February 1949.
He died 12 November, 2003 and is buried at Fort Snelling National Cemetery, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota.

Please visit his memorial on Find a Grave and consider leaving virtual flowers and a note on his Find-a-Grave Memorial.