January 14, 1925 – M’Allister was Seen Alive Late as Monday Morning

The Savannah Press – January 14, 1925


The county police who are investigating all circumstances in regard to the murder of Edward L. McAllister at his home on Thirty-ninth street, near Ash, will present their findings at the coroner’s inquest tomorrow morning. This is the time tentatively fixed for the inquiry.

The county police also have direct evidence of the fact that Mr. McAllister was alive as late as early Monday morning. R. L. Coleman who gave his address as 222 Taylor street east, went to the county police headquarters at 10 o’clock this morning and gave out the information that he, a friend, C.F. Smith, and a negro saw Mr. McAllister about 7:30 o’clock Monday morning. He had on his raincoat, a chaki work suit, his gloves and was walking west on Thirty-ninth street, going toward the A.C.L. shuttle train, Coleman said. Mr. McAllister stopped long enough to ask Coleman for a cigarette.

Not Mistaken.

Coleman said he could not be mistaken as to the identity of the murdered man, as he worked with him for two years at the Atlantic Coast Line. He did not see the account of the murder until this morning, when he read it in The Press, he said and decided to tell the officers about it. He first went over and related his stor to Chief of Detectives McCarthy, but finding the county police were handling the case, went to their headquarters. The scene of the crime is about sixty feet beyond the eastern city limits.

Coleman said he lived in the basement at 222 Taylor street east. His friend Smith lives on State street west. On Monday he was working on a bungalow being erected by Charles Voss on Thirty-ninth street, just east of Waters road.

Closer inspection of the body of the dead man at Sipple Brothers’ mortuary disclosed that the murder was probably perpetrated in a cool and deliberate manner by the assailant of the lone man who was seated at his dining table when he was struck with the hatchet, according to the theory of the officers.

Wound in Temple.
A wound on the temple is believed to show that Mr. McAllister was first struck on the side of the head and knocked to the floor. He was then set upon, chopped on the head with the sharp blade and the top of his head then beaten to a pulp with the blunt end.

An examination of the dead man’s stomach is said to have disclosed evidence of decomposition believed to prove that Mr. McAllister had been dead at least forty-eight hours before he was found yesterday Morning.

Drew His Pay.
Other interesting details developed by the offices are that Mr. McAllister worked on last Saturday morning and early in the afternoon drew his wages for two ‘weeks, amounting to $84.75. He is said to have paid out only a small amount for groceries at a local store. When found Mr. McAllister only had 75 cents on his person.

Letter From Mother.
Among the effects of the dead man were found a letter from his mother, who lives in Pittsburgh, Pa., in regard to property there in which Mr. McAllister owned an interest. They also found a will in which proceeds of several insurance policies, amounting to several thousand dollars, and all the other property of the dead man was left to his wife. Mrs. McAllister died several months ago but the beneficiary under the policies had not been changed, it was stated.

Facts believed to be inconsistent with the theory that Mr. McAllister was murdered not later than last Sunday are that his watch taken possession of yesterday at 2 o’clock was still running. Two local jewelers have stated that the large “railroad” watches, the kind that the dead man owned, only run about 30 hours.

Although interesting, we didn’t learn much new about Edward’s life. We learned his mother was probably still alive. We also learned that his will not being changed to reflect his wife’s passing means that it probably went to probate. We also learned that there was several thousands of dollars of insurance policies, however, we know he was born in a pauper’s grave which is a reminder that your burial takes place long before your beneficiaries receive any insurance payments.

January 13, 1925 – Edward L. McAllister is Found Murdered In Home

The Savannah Press – January 13, 1925

Edward L. McAllister, employed at the Atlantic, Coast Line Railway shops, was discovered murdered at his home, on Thirty-ninth Street, near Ash, by H. B. Brown of Bee Road and Victory Drive, at 10 o’clock this morning.

Mr. McAllister was found in the kitchen of his home badly mutilated about the head from hatchet wounds apparently received sometime Saturday evening.

His wife had died last November, and he since had lived in his story house alone. Mr. McAllister was last seen alive Friday afternoon when he left the A.C.L. shops.

Mr. Brown, who also works at the A. C. L., discovered Mr. McAllister’s body when on an investigation to determine why McAllister had not been at work in several days. Mr. and Mrs. Brown went to the house together. The house is owned by Mrs. Brown’s mother.

Body Discovered.

Mr. McAllister was discovered by the Browns after they had inspected the house and decided that no one was at home. They had knocked repeatedly at the door, but had received no response, and were on their way home when they were joined by Tom Carr, another neighbor. Mr. Carr accompanied the Browns to the back of the house, where some of Mrs. Brown’s chickens were kept by Mr. McAllister. The body was first seen through a window. It was after going through the back door that the body was found in the kitchen.

As discovered by Detectives McCarthy and McCord this morning. McAllister was lying in a pool of blood with a big hatchet wound in the top of his head.

Hatchet on Table.
The hatchet with which the crime was committed is lying on the table. Blood is splattered on the wall. The body was lying on the floor with rice from a dish on the table scattered about. The room is otherwise in excellent order with no apparent sign of a struggle. The dead man was supposedly eating a meal when his assailant struck him in the head.

In his hand is a spoon and the remains of a partially eaten meal are scattered on the floor. The clothing of the dead man not ruffled and there is no sign in or out of the house to indicate any conflict. In the room were two chairs facing one another. On the wall above the body were blood stains. These stains are also on the table where the hatchet had been placed.

Mr. McAllister is survived by a brother, J.M. McAllister of Pittsburgh. Letters sent to the dead man from relatives in Pittsburgh were found in the room.

Unused Still.
On the table of the kitchen a partially filled bottle of corn whisky was found. In the front room was an unused copper still sent from a mail order house in Chicago.
The belongings of his deceased wife were gathered in a bundle, in the front of the house and the dwelling had apparently been used solely by McAllister since last November, when she had passed away.

Among the dead man’s effects was a letter from the county police, directing that he not bring his wife in for treatment until a few days later than had been planned. Mrs. McAllister had been under the care of the physician at the jail.

His Clothing.
The dead man was dressed in a corduroy suit and khaki shirt. He was stretched upon the floor, with the chair upon which he had apparently been sitting standing upright near at hand, close enough to the table to have been used while eating a meal.

The only mark of disarrangement in the room was a small fragment of arm cushion used as a rest on the only other chair in the

(Continued on Page Seven)

room, a rocker. This small fragment was found on the floor. 

Time of Crime.

That the crime was committed at least twenty-four hours before the discovery of the body is the opinion of an authority. Sipple Bros., morticians, are in charge of the body.
The time of the crimes believed to be about Saturday around dusk. The oil lamps found In the house were partially filled. None of these had burped down as would have been the case if they had been lighted at the time of the crime. A copy of the Saturday afternoon newspaper was found in the room close beside the dead man.

All other papers found in the room were folded away in a corner.
The McAllister house is situated more than the distance of one city block from any other dwelling. It is the only two-story in the neighborhood and it is separated by an overgrown field from several of the other homes. 
Up to the time of the printing of this edition of The Press no relatives of the murdered man had been located in Savannah.

Brown’s Account.

McAllister had not been to work for three days. H. B. Brown, who
found the body, said:

“This morning my wife and I wend to the place. My wife went to the rear door to see some chickens McAllister was keeping for us. I went to the front door and knocked, but, got no response. Tom Carr a neighbor, came up and went to the kitchen window to see what was inside the house. I saw Mr. McAllistser’s legs sticking out toward the center of the room. I at first thought he was hurt, but finally saw be was dead.”

McAllister had worked in railroad shops at Hamlet and Columbia before coming to Savannah.
Dr. G.H. Johnson, the coroner, has taken charge of the case and  will conduct the inquest.

Ash street is located several blocks east of Waters Road and runs north, and south. It starts at Anderson street.
Thanks to the 
University of Georgia, Main Library
Athens, GA 30602 United States
for possessing a microform holding of the paper.

Interlibrary Loan and Edward McAllister

I know I mentioned it before, but I’ve got to mention it again, Interlibrary loan is one of your best friends. I wrote last January about the Georgia Virtual Vault and Edward Lamb McAllister
I still had many questions regarding Edward’s murder.  Could newspaper articles provide answers to the questions I’ve been looking for?
One of my favorite places to look for books, or anything is WorldCat. WorldCat is a huge network of library content. It will tell you the availability of all kinds of things at thousands of libraries. So, I wanted to see where I might find the newspapers I was looking.
It took some poking around WorldCat to find a Savannah newspaper from 1925 available.  World Cat showed The Savannah Press had issues from 1891 to 1931 available at two libraries.  Zooming in, I found it available at University of Georgia, only about 1-1/2 hour drive so certainly a possible road trip. (The holding at University of Rochester (NY) was a bit far for a visit.)  Looking more closely at their holdings, they appeared to have both a paper and microform versions and the microform has multiple copies. One more click and I see their status as “Not Checked Out.” I took that as code that they allow the film to be checked out and will allow interlibrary loan.  
Logging into my county library, I selected their interlibrary loan option, which opened their link to WorldCat. I found the same selection, Savannah Press, and ordered it.
Savannah Press
Jan 14, 1925, Pg 14
A few weeks later I receive a call from my county library, the microfilm has arrived.  Going through unindexed newspapers on microfilm is a brutal process. This one was like I expected.  The nice thing about having the film local is I didn’t have to review it all in one sitting.  I could take my time and review the material over several visits if I so desired. Nice. 
Anyway, the view was about 1/12 of the page, so it was necessary to make three sweeps across each page, top, middle bottom, looking for relevant articles. I read, the papers slowly looking for key words in headlines and the first paragraph of most articles. Luckily, I could skip over the Society pages, and the entertainment pages.
I found nine articles during the two weeks following his murder. Lots of detail about Edward’s life, a photo of Edward, a photo of the man arrested for the murder and a photo of that man’s wife. Could she be the woman he was “bedding,” as mentioned in the family oral history? There was even a photo of the grizzly murder weapon. 
What a treasure trove of information. Having the film available via interlibrary loan save me several hours driving time, parking hassles, (It is usually a hassle parking at a University.) and the frustration of using unfamiliar equipment. Yes, Interlibrary is one of my best friends. 

Caroline Pankey’s Mother – Martha!

Needless to say when you begin a new genealogical subscription or service you want to check out if it might clear up one of your brick walls.  In one of my research areas, I have someone who died back in “the late 1960s or early ‘70s” and I am yet to find an obituary or death record.  I gave it a quick look, no such luck finding it.  Then I thought about another area I’ve been researching.  I knew Caroline M.A. Pankey, b. abt 1810, father was named Thomas Pankey but didn’t know Caroline’s mother’s name. 
Using Genealogy Bank, I searched for Thomas Pankey then narrowed it down to 1750 to 1860.  Walla!  Seven items, five of which were the same legal notice.  
Newspaper Notice (from Virginia Memories)
similar to the one at Genealogy Bank
Thomas Pankey is mentioned in a 1830 Powhatan County, Virginia, Chancery case. A quick read finds that it is the wrong Thomas Pankey, rather than Caroline’s father it is her (before unknown) brother.  The defendants in this case include, “Frank Pankey, Thomas Pankey, ____ Ellis and Mary his wife, _____ Calhoun and Henrietta his wife, _____ Pankey and Nancy his wife, _____ Scott and Elizabeth his wife, _____ Howel and Caroline his wife, which…. are the children of Martha Pankey, dec’d.  Not much doubt about it, Caroline’s mother’s name was clearly Martha and she had two brothers and four sisters that were unknown before. The case was William Pollock, et al, verses Mary Pollock, et al
One of my favorite genealogical sites is Virginia Memory, Library of Virginia. They have a great set of Chancery records.  Pick the County, Powhatan; Plaintiff equals Pollock, Defendant equals Pollock. Search.  One case, index number 1831-015. Click on View Details and there is the first of 109 pages, handwritten documents relating to the case.  Going through the case documents solidified the relationships. One page the same iteration of children of Martha Pankey speaks about Peter M Howell and his wife, Caroline, formerly Caroline M. A. Pankey.  Martha is the sister by half blood of Sarah Ligon formerly Sarah Pollock.  It was a wonderful find. In the maze of documents I find that Martha is the sister of William Liggon, which must be her original name. So, Martha’s half sister Sarah probably married one of Martha’s kin on Martha’s father’s side. So confusing. 
One problem with the Virginia Memory site is that the downloads, although easy to do, do not have the the resolution you would really like to have in your personal files. Downloads, and print to PDF do not have the detail to zoom in and be able to read the complicated documents. You can zoom in on the image to the level needed to read it, do screen shots, then use some kind of stitching software to assemble the desired images.  Alternately, you will just need to document the URL & Page number.   

  
Same image as above downloaded, converted to JPG
To the left is the same image as above downloaded the way that is easy. I then cropped it and saved it to JPG with the maximum settings. It really is unreadable. The image above was zoomed into on line, screen shot taken, then converted to JPG.  Much better quality. 
Virginia Memory, great job and great material, please if at all possible, let the downloads be the same image quality as you are have visible.

More about Donna Montran from Genealogy Bank

Miss Donna Montran
Boston Journal
December 12, 1916
Page – 4 

As I mentioned before there are 20 items in the Genealogy Bank regarding “Donna Montran.” After her, now famous, airplane ride she applied to represent Boston at  New York’s Crystal Palace Preparedness Bazaar.  It is amazing that in those days, the newspapers printed the names and addresses of all the applicants.  Imagine what would happen today if a newspaper published the home addresses of 49 contestants for a beauty contest. Wow.  Anyway, thanks to the policies of the time, we now know that in December if 1916, Donna was living at 64 Bennett in Brighton (Boston), MA. The house at that address today was built in 1920, so we don’t know what 64 Bennett was like back in 1916.  It is interesting to note that there were two Holdsworth girls who also applied to represent Boston.  Holdsworth was the name of one of Donna’s mother’s husbands — I wonder if there is a relationship.

By the way, Preparedness Bazaar referred to actions to prepare the United States to enter into World War I, which the US Didn’t do until the following year.

Donna doesn’t show up in the Genealogy Bank papers again until 1919 when she was in the play “Chin Chin” where she played at the Pinney Theater (Demolished) in Boise, Idaho where she received accolades for her role as the “good fairy”. She continued that role at the Powers Theater in Grand Rapids, and the Saginaw Auditorium in February, 1920.
Donna played at the Garden in Baltimore in March 1921
Donna then began a run of “The California Bathing Beauties” with Donna Montran. In September and October of 1920, she played the Garden in Baltimore, the Cosmos in Washington, DC, and the Capitol Theatre in Wilkes-Barre, PA. 

In the spring of 1921 she played at the State Theater in Trenton, NJ, again at both the Cosmos in Washington, DC and the Garden in Baltimore. 
The Genealogy Bank newspaper articles added a substantial number of new and exciting details to our understanding of Donna’s life.