Price – Surname Saturday

Howell Research
Howell/Hobbs/Long/Bryan/Price Line

By Don Taylor

Origin

The surname Price originated in Wales. It is a corruption of the name Ap-rhys, meaning ‘son of Rhys’. The first name “Rhys” is thought to derive from the Old Welsh, meaning ‘ardour’[i].

The name is also found very early in parts of England far removed from Welsh influence. In such cases, it presumably derives from Middle English, Old French pris ‘price’, ‘prize’, perhaps as a metonymic occupational name for a fixer of prices.[ii]

My Wife’s Price Ancestors

Thomas Price who married Mary (LNU) is the earliest Price ancestor for whom I have a name. I do not know when or where he was born.

His son, William Price was born about 1729 in Martin County, North Carolina. According to the Sons of the American Revolution records, he was a patriot serving as a Sergeant with the North Carolina Troup.[iii]

His son, also named William Price, was born on 14 Feb 1762 in Martin County, North Carolina. According to SAR records, he too was a patriot serving in North Carolina.[iv] It is said he was the last Revolutionary War soldier in Martin County when he was buried in 1848. He would have been 86-years-old.

William’s (1762) oldest daughter, Cherry Price, was born on 3 March 1793 in Martin County, North Carolina. She married John W. Bryan on 16 August 1810 and was the last of the Price ancestors.

My wife’s ancestry in Martin County, North Carolina, runs deep with many generations who were born, lived, and died in Martin County.

Today, Price is the 82nd most common name in the United States and the 46th most common name in North Carolina with over 15,000 individuals with the surname there. There were 143 people with the Price surname in Martin County which makes it the 24th most common name in the county[v].

Direct Price Ancestors

Further Direct Descendants

Known relatives.

My records have 281 direct-line descendants of Thomas Price identified which is about 10% of my known Howell-Darling Family Tree. If you are a direct descendant of any of the above ancestors, I would love to hear from you and connect your tree to this one.



ENDNOTES

[i] Internet:  Forebears Surname Search: Price (https://forebears.io/surnames/price)

[ii] Source: Dictionary of American Family Names ©2013, Oxford University Press as cited by Ancestry.Com at https://www.ancestry.com/name-origin?surname=Price

[iii] Sons of the American Revolution, Ancestry, database (http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=2204), SAR Application – James Hardy Price – National Number 41262.

[iv] Ibid.

[v] Internet:  Forebears Surname Search: Price (https://forebears.io/surnames/price)

Amanuensis the Easy Way

Amanuensis Monday
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.A few years ago, I wrote a post about my wife’s 4th great-grandfather, Lewis Bryan (1755-1830) and that he had purchased his land from Robert Bryan. That post received several comments. One included a clue from Gloria Knight who said, “I have found where a “Patent” was issued on 10 Dec 1760 to a Robert Bryan. Source: Halifax County N.C. Land Grants – Secretary of State – Land Grants Record Books 1693-1960. Grant # was 82; File # 14. 520 acres on Conotoe Creek.”

I had meant to find that reference and incorporate it into my information regarding Robert Bryan. I just hadn’t gotten around to it. Her comment/clue reminded me of three significant resources matters.

Networking

So many of us want to be self-sufficient we tend to forget many researchers have been there before and we can and should build upon their work. For example, Gloria’s clue provided enough information that I could easily, and quickly build upon her work. Not just accept what she said but use it as a hint as a beginning point. I know that professional genealogists want every source to be quoted in a fashion identified in Evidence Explained. Sure, that is THE standard for citing sources.  However, rather than getting all twisted around the citation standards, I am most interested in having enough information about the source that I can find it for myself. In this case, a Google search for Gloria’s clue, “Halifax County N.C. Land Grants ” brought me immediately to North Carolina Land Grant Images and Data. Seeing Search Query on the page, I searched for Name: “Bryan” and County: Halifax. Six entries were returned, one the 520 Acres of Robert Bryan.  The page also had a link to an image in Book 14, Pages 114-115. There it was, an image of the original patent book. The key to me is Gloria had provided enough information regarding her source that I was able to find the source in less than a minute myself. To me that is the ultimate reason for citations and building upon or confirming her research is the ultimate purpose of networking.

Wikipedia

I knew from previous research with this family line that Martin County was previously Halifax County.  There are many sites to learn that kind of information. However, I have found that Wikipedia is possibly the best and easiest way to confirm such information. On Wikipedia, just search <NAME> County, <STATE> and you get the appropriate wiki page.  In this case. I entered “Martin County, North Carolina” In the History section of the page returned said,

The county was formed in 1774 from the southeastern part of Halifax County and the western part of Tyrrell County.

I could have just as easily gone to the Halifax County, North Carolina page and learned that,

In 1774 the southeastern part of Halifax County was combined with part of Tyrrell County to form Martin County.

I think every county page on Wikipedia has a “History” section. I find that the County entries in Wikipedia to be a great asset. Besides quick history, there is a Communities section which shows the cities, towns, unincorporated communities, and townships within the county. Great information to have handy when reviewing Census and other records. I can be a real help in understanding that an incorporated community in your genealogy is near town that may have been their post office which may have been in a township.  So, when you see the names change in different documents, you can understand that your ancestors may have been in the same place even though multiple names were used.

Google

Finally, I wanted to transcribe the patent information from the document. I’ll admit, I don’t like transcribing 18th century handwriting very much. I mean, I can do it, I just don’t like doing it. In this case, I could easily read the document started out “Robert Bryan Five hundred and twenty acres.” A Google search of those exact words led to one result. A quick review of the result showed it was a transcript of the document I wanted to transcribe. Dated the 10th day of December 1760.  Then, rather than transcribe the original text, all I needed to do is to read the transcription and see if I agreed with the transcription.  Much faster – much easier. Then, I added the transcript to my source documents identifying it:

Transcription by <Unknown>  found on site, BMGEN.COM
“Genealogy data relating to the Brian and Mitchell families.”

So, I have my copy of the original image, and I have my source for that image documented. I also have a transcription of the information, confirmed and reviewed by me. I am good with that and can move on to the next project.

Transcription

Transcription by <Unknown> found on site, BMGEN.COM

ROBERT BRYAN five hundred and twenty acres of land in Halifax County.

Beginning at a Pine, his corner on Conneto Swamp running thence up said swamp to a Maple at the mouth of Wild Cat Branch; then up said branch to a Poplar in said branch; then W 62 poles to a Red Oak; then S 160 poles to a Pine; then W 40 poles to two Sweet Gums in a branch; then S 280 poles to a Pine; then W 88 poles to a pine in MOSES HORN’s line; then along his line S 23 E 174 poles to a White Oak, his corner on Conneto Creek; then down said creek to a Pine, JOHN HORN’s corner on said creek; then along his line N 17 E 142 poles to a Pine, his corner in said BRYAN’s line; then along his line W 16 poles to a Pine, his corner; then along his line N 270 poles to a Pine, his corner on a branch; then down the branch, his line, to the first station.

Dated 10th day of December, 1760

Conclusion

  1. Pay attention to hints from anywhere – check them out for yourself.
  2. The North Carolina Land Grant site is an awesome resource. Be sure to include it in your resources.
  3. Don’t forget Wikipedia County searches can be helpful.
  4. Check Google (or Bing or Yahoo) to see if the words you want transcribed  have already been transcribed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deed Transfer – Robert Bryan to Lewis Bryan

Amanuensis Monday – Howell Research – 3 April 1794

Transcription & Interpretation by Don Taylor

[Source: Martin County Old Deed Records. Book C, Pages 248 and 249.]

Image of Deed Record of property transfer Robert Bryan to Lewis Bryan (1)
Martin County Old Deed Records. Book C, Page 249.

This Indenture made this the 3rd day of April in the year of our lord

Christ One Thousand Seven Hundred Ninety Four between Robert

Bryan of Martin county and Province of North Carolina of the one

part and Lewis Bryan of the County and province aforesaid of the other

part ??? ??? that the said Robert Bryan for and in Consideration

of the sum of one hundred pounds give to him in land  ???  ??? to

[page change]

Image of Deed Record of property transfer Robert Bryan to Lewis Bryan (2)
Martin County Old Deed Records. Book C, Page 249.

in him off?? do our knowledge therein of these with fully satisfied and paid and ??

in faith granted buy and sold and by these presents doth grant bargain

see unto the said Lewis Bryan his heirs and assigns forever a tract of land

Containing one hundred ninety acres lying and being in the county of Martin

On the south side of Conoho Creek Beginning at a point in Hampton ?? ???

Tence No 59 N E 180 Pole asine Thence no 35 W S45 pole to asire on the ???

Thence along the ?? Creek to 59 E b 180 pole to an path thence to 35 EB 145 pole

Bryan ?? by deed of sale proved and registered in the registrar’s office of

??? county together with all houses buildings & privileges ??? residences

to the same belonging or in anywise appertaining unto the said Lewis Bryan

his heirs and assigns forever. In witness ?? of I Robert Bryan hise???

In the presence of ??? Witness.

John Hyman Durat

Catron Bryan (Her Mark) [Plain “X”]

Robert R Bryan (His Mark)


Facts:

Residences: Robert Bryan and Lewis Bryan were alive on 3 Apr 1894 and both lived in Martin County, North Carolina

Event: Property Sale – Robert Bryan sold 190 acres in Martin County for 100 pounds to Lewis Brian. I am unable to decipher the physical location of the property other than it appears to be adjoining Conoho Creek.

———-
DISCLAIMER
———-

Discover

 

Lewis Bryan (1755-1830)

52 Ancestors #8 – Lewis Bryan (1755-1830)

Birth:  2 March 1755 – Oak City, Halifax County, North Carolina.

There are several sources regarding Lewis’ birth that indicate he was born on March 2nd, the year is somewhat in question.  The best is a Roots Web message board where a person indicates that he or she has access to a bible with the 2 March date but the year was difficult to read, but thought it said 1756. I definitely want to see if I can get a copy of the page to confirm it myself.  Two of the DAR descendants records indicate birth year as 1756 as well. Another possibility is 1757.  The “Martin County Heritage” article by Sara Long Johnson indicates 1757; so does a different DAR descendant record (Nat’l #: 710397).

Excerpt from 1800 Census – North Carolina, Martin, Halifax, Pg 3
Thanks: Ancestry.Com

However, I believe that Lewis was born in 1755 (or earlier). The 1800 Census indicates that Lewis was 45 or older. With his birthday being in March, he had to have been born in 1755 or earlier in order to be “45 or older” for the census enumeration in August of 1800.

Oak City was in Halifax County until 1774, when Martin County was created.

Marriages:

I believe there may have been three marriages.  one about 1777, a second marriage about 1787 and, possibly, a third marriage on about the time of John’s birth in 1788.

It is not really clear when Lewis married Lucretia. All three of the DAR Descendant records indicate he married in 1788. However, either there was a first wife or Lewis and Lucretia “lived in sin” for a number of years.  I believe there was a first wife, whose name we do not know.

Children:

  • 1878 – Catherine
  • 1779 – Turner
  • 1781 – Mary
  • 1783 – Silas
    (Possible 2nd marriage between 1783 & 1788)
  • 1788 – John
    (Possible 3rd marriage in 1788? )

All of the DAR records are consistent that Lewis’s parents, Robert and Elizabeth Bryan, died on the same date, 3 April 1794.

Lewis lived in Martin County all of his life. In 1797, he lived in “District 7.” Likewise, the 1800 Census indicates they lived in Martin County.

His son, Turner, was married in 1802 and his son John married in 1810.

His wife Lucretia probably died in December, 1829.  I suggest that because Lewis signed a new will on Dec. 24, 1830.  His new will did not mention his wife.  It does mention the following:

  • Daughter: Catherine Hyman
  • Son: Turner Bryan
  • Son: Silus Bryan
  • Son: William Bryan
  • Son: John Bryan
  • Daughter: Mary P Mayo

It also mentions a Granddaughter: Sally Hyman.

 (Note: Although William was named to receive some items directly, he was not mentioned to receive a portion of the remaining inheritance.)

Death:

The DAR records indicate that Lewis died on 24 December, 1829.  This is the date he signed his will, so, it is unlikely his actual death date.  The “Martin County Heritage” article and another researcher on the Roots Web Board indicate that Lewis died on 6 January, 1830, which is a much more likely date.  Lewis’ will was probated during the April 1830 session of the court.  I believe that the 6 January, 1830 date is the correct date for Lewis’ passing.

Burial:

In his will, Lewis asked that his body “be committed to mother Earth.”   Searches at Find-a-Grave and at Billion Graves did not result in finding a marked gravesite.  Likewise, a search of various sites regarding cemeteries in Martin County did not return any results. Other documents indicate that there was once a “Bryan Family Cemetery.” I have been unable to associate that cemetery with any cemeteries in the area. This is definitely an area for further research.

The Great Ancestors

  1. Deborah Ann Long
  2. Martha Ann Bryan
  3. John Bryan
  4. Lewis Bryan 
  5. Robert Bryan (Patriot)

Future Action Items:

  • Confirm Bible Record.
  • Confirm Robert & Elizabeth Bryan died same date, 3 April 1794.
  • Document mention of the “Bryan family cemetery,” (make sure my memory isn’t thinking of a “Price family cemetery or something else), find where it may exist today, then search for Lewis Bryan’s marker.

Feedback

If you have any thoughts, agreements or disagreements regarding any of my statements, findings, or thoughts, please leave a comment or email me directly.  I would love to share research on North Carolina’s Martin County Bryans.

Sources: