McAllister – Surname Saturday

McAllister Name Origin

McAllister is an Anglicized form of the Gaelic name, Mac Alasdair, meaning “son of Alasdair.” Alasdair is the Gaelic form of Alexander. There are dozens of forms for this surname. My wife’s family line has records both under McAllister and McAlister (one “l”).

Geographical

Worldwide there are approximately 52,878 people who bear the McAllister surname. The vast majority, over 38,000, in the United States, with England and Canada being distant second and third (about 6,000 and 5,000 respectively). In terms of frequency, Northern Ireland has the greatest proportion of the McAllister surname, where one in 526 people have the surname. Scotland is the second most frequent area for people surnamed McAllister.

 

My Wife’s Direct McAllister Ancestors

Historical

1920

My wife’s great-grandmother, Hannah (McAllister) Darling died in 1913.

                     Peter McAllister’s Passport Photo

Her father, Peter McAllister, was estranged from his wife and was rooming at 2237 Salisbury Street in Pittsburgh, PA. In 1920, Pennsylvania had 146 McAllister families (about 6% of the McAllister families in the US). Peter, his wife Margaret, his son John, his son Edward, and his son Joseph constituted 5 of those 146 McAllister families.

Peter was my wife’s immigrant McAllister Ancestor. Peter had three sons, Frank, Edward, and John, all of whom immigrated to the United States in 1886-1887. A fourth son, Joseph was born in New York in 1889. Frank died young and I have only found daughters descended from John. Edward and Joseph both had sons that would have carried on the McAllister surname (and their Y-DNA).

1881

In 1881, Peter, and his wife Margaret, lived at 5 High Church Street in Workington, England, in 1881. He worked as an Engineman and the couple had two children at census time. According to Forebears, in 1881, there were 900 incidences of the McAllister surname in England and another 2,649 in Scotland.

Oral History

Family oral history indicated that the McAllister family was Scots. Although I have not found any ancestors (yet) that lived in Scotland, the family did live in Workington, Cockermouth, and Carlisle, all in the north of England. Workington is only about 20 miles from Scotland across the Solway Firth (part of the Irish Sea) and about a 42 miles drive to Gretna Green, Scotland. Cockermouth and Carlisle are even closer to Scotland.

Family oral history also talked of a “Black Peter McAllister” who was a blockade runner during the US Civil War. Apparently called “Black Peter” because of being bad.  Anyway, second great-grandfather Peter McAllister was too young to have been “Black Peter” (aged 10 to 15 during the Civil War).  However, his grandfather was also named “Peter.” Peter, the elder, would have been born in the late 1700s and is a candidate for having been involved in the US Civil War. I need to do more research regarding Peter McAlister, the elder. It would be great to find information regarding the McAllister’s being involved in the US Civil War.

My wife’s known McAllister relatives.

My records have identified 105 direct-line descendants of Peter McAllister (the elder).

Sources:

 

Vincent-Vinson – Surname Saturday

By Don Taylor

Name Origin Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.

It seems that the surname “Vinson” has two separate origins. First is that it comes from the “son of Vin or Vincent.” The second is that it is a corruption or variant of “Vincent.” It does not appear that my wife’s ancestors were from a patronymic society, so Vinson is more likely  a corruption of “Vincent.”

When in doubt, I’ll now use Vincent as the preferred surname, unless there is some uncontroversial reason for using Vinson. That plan suggests I need to relook carefully at my wife’s great-grandmother, Susan R Vinson, whose parents were John and Lenora Vincent.

Geographical

Worldwide there are approximately 283,936 people who bear the Vincent surname.

It is most prevalent in France, with the United States having the second-highest incidence, with over 67,000 Vincent’s in the US.

My Wife’s Earliest Vincent Ancestors

All of my wife’s Vincent ancestors lived in North Carolina. Her earliest known Vincent ancestor was Philip Vincent. It is not clear where he was born, but during the 1800 Census, he was over 45, suggesting he was born before 1755. He lived in Edgecombe County, North Carolina, in 1790. In 1840, Philip’s son, Burkett Vincent, was living in Halifax County with a household consisting of 5 people. His was one of only 22 Vincent families living in North Carolina during 1840. Burkett’s son, John Vincent was born about 1816 in Halifax County and died sometime before 1870. His daughter, Susan R. Vincent (aka Susan Vinson) was born on 22 August 1848. She married Peter Fletcher Howell shortly after the Civil War, on 10 December 1866.

Direct Vincent (Vinson) Ancestors

      1. Great-grandmother: Susan R Vinson (aka Vincent) (1848-1910) Family Search
      2. 2nd Great-grandfather: John Vincent (1816-1870) Family Search
      3. 3nd Great-grandfather: Burkett Vincent (1779-1850) Family Search
      4. 4rd Great-grandfather: Philip Vincent (bef. 1755-c.1807) Family Search

Known relatives.

My records have 155 direct-line descendants of Philip Vincent identified, which is almost 5% of my Howell-Darling Research.

Sources:

Brashears – Surname Saturday

Roberts – Brashears

Brashears Name Origin or Meaning

None of the sources I have provide a meaning for the surname Brashears. Ancestry indicates that it is an Americanized form of French (Huguenot) Brasseur[i]. Forebears indicates that virtually all of the people with the Brashears surname live in the United States. Likewise, ForeBears indicates it is an Americanized form of Brasseur and is almost entirely in the United States. Today, individuals with the Brasseur surname live mostly in France and Belgium[ii].

Geographical

Worldwide there are approximately 3,003 people who bear the Brashears surname.

It is most prevalent in the United State where over 99 percent of the people with the Brashear surname live[iii].

My Earliest Brashear Ancestors


Discover you family history through historical newspapers at Newspapers.com
I don’t know where any of my Brashears ancestors were born. I believe that my fourth-great-grandmother, Rebecca Brashears, was born about 1771. She married Elias Roberts about 1786 and the two located to Tennessee in the 1790s.

Her father, Robert Samuel Brashears, appears to have been born about 1731.
His father, Robert Cager Brashears, was possibly born about 1700[iv].
His father, Samuel Brashears, was possibly born about 1670[iv].

I have not determined an immigrant ancestor, so where my Brashears came from would be entirely speculation. That said, Rebecca Brashears is number 6 on my Roberts research list, so, hopefully, I’ll be able to research her in depth by next June (2020).

My Direct Brashears Ancestors

65 – 4th Great Grandmother: Rebecca Brashears (1771-1859)
130 – 5th Great-grandfather: Robert Samuel Brashears (1731-1819)
260 – 6th Great-grandfather: Robert Cager Brashears
520 – 7th Great-grandfather: Samuel Brashears

Brashears Descendants

My records have 362 direct-line descendants of Samuel Brashears identified in my tree.

I have no known living Y-DNA descendants of Robert Samuel Brashears[v].

I have no known living mtDNA descendants of Rebecca Brashears[v].



Sources:

Ancestry – Don Taylor’s Roberts-Brown-2019 Tree accessed 6 June 2019.

Endnotes:

[i] Internet: Ancestry.Com – Name Origins – Brashears. https://www.ancestry.com/name-origin?surname=brashears

[ii] Internet: Forebears – Results of a name search for Brasseur. https://forebears.io/surnames/brasseur

[iii] Ibid.

[iv] Speculative dates based upon nothing but the age of their children.

[v] If you are a descendant of Samuel Brashears that carries his Y-DNA or a descendant of Rebecca Brashear that carries her mtDNA, I would love to hear from you.

Surname Saturday – Beardsley

Darling Line
By Don Taylor

Name Origin

According to Forebears, the surname “Beardsley” is a derivation of “Bardsley,” which was derived from being from a place, ‘of Bardsley.’ Bardsley is a parish between Ashton and Oldham, near Manchester. The American Bardsleys, and all the North English Bardsleys, and perhaps all the Beardsleys, hail from the Lancashire parish[i].

Ancestry suggests the name may be based upon an unidentified place, possibly in Nottinghamshire, where the surname is particularly common[ii].

Of course, I need to see things in order to understand the relationships of locations in England. Using Google Maps, I learned that Forebears puts the Beardsleys up near Manchester and Ancestry suggests a location 60 miles southeast of Manchester.  Oddly enouth, my Beardsley are from Ilkeston and Stratford-upon-Avon (50 and 90 miles from Manchester).

Locations of Beardsleys based on Forebears and Ancestry are in Gray and the locations of my wife’s Beardsley ancestors births. 

It seems odd to me that William and his son were born so far apart. It makes me wonder if my data regarding their birthplaces is incorrect.  Additionally, I’m relying mostly upon the research of others for those specific locations (sources I’ve found only say they were born in England). In any event, I haven’t had a chance to research these individuals in depth yet. However, the Interregnum may explain the relocation.

Geographical

Worldwide there are approximately 12,390 people who bear the Beardsley surname.

It is most prevalent in the United State where over three-quarters of the people with the Beardsley surname live. Little Montserrat (a small island in the Lesser Antilles has the highest density of Beardsleys with 1 in 1,220 people having the surname.

Earliest Beardsley Ancestors

My wife’s ninth-great-grandfather, William Beardsley was born about 1604 in Stratford-on-Avon, Warwickshire, England. I, of course, like to imagine that young William Beardsley was named for William Shakespheare, a contemporary of the town of Stratford on Avon. Likewise, little William was about 12-years-old when Shakespeare died, so I speculate that William had seen, or at least knew of Shakespeare. William moved to Ilkeston, Darbyshire, England sometime before 1630 where he married Marie Harvie.

There, he had a son, Joseph Beardsley, who was born in Ilkeston, Darbyshire, England in 1635.

It was sometime before 1665 that William, Marie, and Joseph located to the Colonies and settled in Stratford, Fairfield County, Connecticut.

Flag of the United Kingdom
Immigrant Ancestor

The Interregnum of England took place from 1649 to 1660. (The between the execution of Charles I and the arrival of Charles II and the start of the Restoration[iii]. It was the time of Oliver Cromwell. More research is needed to know if they arrived in the Colonies before during, or after the Interregnum. In any event, it was a time of great upheaval in England and that chaos might have been the cause for leaving England for the new world.

So, both William and Joseph were immigrant ancestors from England.

Joseph married Abigail Phebe Dayton in Connecticut in 1665. They had a daughter, Hannah Beardsley, who is my wife’s seventh-great-grandmother.

My wife’s direct Beardsley ancestors:

  • Grandfather: Robert Harry Darling (1905-1969)
  • Great-grandfather: Rufus Harry Darling (1857-1917)
  • 3nd Great-grandmother: Elizabeth Jane Swayze (1818-1896)
  • 3rd Great-grandfather: David Swayze (1796-1850)
  • 4rd Great-grandfather: David Swayze (1762-1838)
  • 5th Great-grandfather: Amos Swayze (1739-1813)
  • 6th Great-grandfather: Mathias Swayze (1699-1728)
  • 7th Great-Grandmother: Hannah Beardsley (1671-1742)
  • 8th Great-Grandfather: Joseph Beardsley (1634-1712)
  • 9th Great-Grandfather: William Beardsley (1602-1661)

Known relatives.

Although I only have 11 Beardsley in my data, my records have identified 271 direct-line descendants of William Beardsley.

Sources:

Endnotes:

Long – Surname Saturday

Long – Surname Saturday

Howell-Hobbs-Long

Long Surname Meaning

The European surname Long is a descriptive term regarding the stature of the original bearer of the name.[i] Think of it in terms of a “long tall” individual. The Chinese surname “Long” derives from the name “Yu-Long” meaning “resistor of dragons.” Finally, there is a Cambodian variant of the name which is unexplained.[ii]

Geographical

Worldwide there are approximately 516,166 people who bear the Long surname.

It is most prevalent in the United State where over half of the people with the Long surname live. Interestingly enough, Cambodia has the greatest frequency of the name where it is the 19th most prevalent name in the country.

In the United States, the greatest incidence is in California. North Carolina is 4th in incidence (people with the surname) and number one in frequency where 1 in 666 people have the surname.[iii]

Earliest Long Ancestors

Annie Deborah Long was born in Martin County, North Carolina in 1846 and died in Martin County, North Carolina in 1913.

Her father, Samuel Aquilla Long, was also born and died in North Carolina.

I don’t know where Samuel’s father, John Long, or his father’s father, Aquilla Long, were born or where they died.

In 1920 there were 1272 people with the Long surname in North Carolina. Twenty-one of those people are known descendants of Aquilla Long. I haven’t had a chance to research John Long or his father, Aquilla Long yet. I expect many more Long relatives to be found when I do that.

Direct Long Ancestors

Known relatives.

My records have 187 descendants of Aquilla Long identified; 21 of them have the Long surname.

Sources:

Endnotes:

[i] Internet: Forebears – Surname Search Results for “Long” on 30 January 2019. See: https://forebears.io/surnames/long

[ii] Internet: Ancestry – Name Origins – “Long Family History” accessed 30 Jan 2019. See: https://www.ancestry.com/name-origin?surname=Long

[iii] See Endnote #1 above – Forebears.