Twelve Darling Greats Discovered

Bright Shiny Objects – A Distraction can be Okay

Howell-Darling-2016 Research
Darling Line

By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.The Blizzard of 2017 was a great day to knuckle down and do some genealogy – as long as the power held out. My plan was to find information about Hannah Carpenter, my wife’s 4th great-grandmother. I wasn’t finding anything of interest regarding her. So, I stepped back and began looking at her husband’s (Abner Darling’s) records in more detail. Some time ago, I found a source for information on the Beekman Patent in Duchess County, New York.  It appeared that Abner came out of the Beekman Patent and I needed to research it further to understand how he may have found his wife, Hannah.  So, I looked at that material and became distracted. That document also mentioned a source, a 1913 book, The Darling Family in America, which I found a copy of online. Between the two sources, I extracted the possible names of a dozen Darling ancestors and several dozen siblings of those ancestors.  I learned:

Abner’s parents (My wife’s 5th great-grandparents):

192. Ebenezer Darling (1718-1790)
193. Mary Hakes

Abner’s grandparents:

  1. Benjamin Darling (1687-1772)
  2. Mehitable White (1689-?)
  3. Solomon Hakes
  4. Anna Billings

Half of Abner’s Great-Grandparents

  1. Dennis Darling (c. 1640-1717)
  2. Hannah Francis
  3. Thomas White
  4. Mehitable (?Thornton?)

And even two of Abner’s 2nd Great Grandparents (My wife’s 8th great-grandparents)

1538.  John Francis
1539. Rosa (??)

Wow!  I’ll be the first to admit, abandoning my research on Hannah Carpenter and diving into these Darling materials was going for the bright shiny objects.  I didn’t stay with my research plan. And yes, I “wasted a day” documenting what I found in “The Settlers of the Beekman Patent – Darling Document” and The Darling Family in America. Incorporating that information into a “notional” tree wasn’t part of my research plan for the day. Nothing confirmed, but a great outline to begin working.

We received about 17 inches of snow, had winds over 35 miles per hour for more than three hours, and had visibilities less than a quarter of a mile – an official blizzard. We didn’t lose power, though over 21 thousand people did here in southern Maine.  However, I was able to work most of the day on the Darling Family. I don’t learn anything new about Hannah Carpenter, but that’s okay.  Acquiring the likely names, birth dates, and places of a dozen other ancestors is a good day.  I’ll remember the Blizzard of 2017; it was the day I followed my wife’s Darling line went back to The Great Migration.

Howell-Darling 2017

List of Grandparents

Further Actions / Follow-up

  • Return to Hannah Carpenter and research more about her life.

One more thing, it appears that one of Dennis Darling’s other children, 6th great uncle John Darling, came to Scarborough in the 1600s – a tidbit of information that could keep me involved for days of research at the Scarborough Museum where I volunteer.


Sources:

Doherty, Frank J., “Settlers of the Beekman Patent, The” – File: Darling.doc. See https://settlers-of-the-beekman-patent.myshopify.com/.

Clemens, William M., Darling Family in America, The (1913), Archive.Org.

Ancestor Biography – Abner Darling (1747-aft. 1800)

Howell-Darling-2016 Research
Darling Line

By Don Taylor

List of Grandparents

Grandfather (#6): Robert Harry Darling (1905-1969)
1st Great (#12): Rufus Harry Darling (1856-1917)
2nd Great (#24): Rufus Holton Darling (1815-1857)
3rd Great (#48): Abner Darling (1780-1839)
4th Great (#96): Abner Darling (1747-18??)

Abner Darling (1747-aft. 1800)

Abner Darling was born on 19 May 1747[1] probably in New Hampshire.
Nothing is known about his childhood. There was a “terrible earthquake” in New Hampshire in 1757, when Abner was 10 years old. We don’t know if he experienced that or not. Certainly, the French and Indian Wars 1754–1763 would have affected him. In any event, it appears that he and his family located to New York and settled in the Beekman Patent area. I need to do further research to determine when the Darlings moved to the Beekman Patent area (Dutchess County, New York).
He married Hannah Carpenter on 23 Dec 1768[2]. Some researchers indicate that Hannah’s surname may have been Reed.  Much more research is needed regarding Hannah.
Children of Abner and Hannah Darling
1770 – 16 Jan– Abner’s first child, Mary was born. She would marry Daniel Felton on 7 Aug 1787.
1771 – Feb – Lucy was born.
1772 – another child was born; name and sex are unknown.
1773 – Feb – Sylvia was born; she married Robert Felton on 1 Feb 1790 and died on 8 May 1838.
1775 – 8 Feb – First known son, Thomas, was born. He died as an infant in 1776.
1776 – 2 Oct – Their second son, also named Thomas was born. He married Mary Winslow in October 1800.
1778 – 22 Oct – Esther was born. She married David Maker on 12 Oct 1800.
1780 – 20 Dec – Third-great-grandfather Abner was born. He married Sally Ann Munsell on 3 Feb 1803[3] and died on 11 Jan 1839.
1783 – 10 Jan – Reid (or Ried) was born. He married Mary Wayne on 1 Jan 1806. Many researchers indicate Reid married on 16 Jan 1806; however, I read the Bible record differently seeing “1806 Jan’ry 1st“ rather than “Jan’ry 16.”
Bible Entry for marriage between Reid Darling and Mary Wayne
I read as “Jan’ry 1st”
Source: The National Archives via Fold 3
1785 – 29 Jan – Twins were born Lucinda and Luana.
Lucinda married Andrus Munsell on 28 Aug 1803.
Luana married Job Gardner 18 Sep 1803.
1787 – 14 Jan – Another set of twins were born.
Alanson married Nancy Deming in August 1804.]
Deidama – Status unknown.
1789 – 3 Feb – Hannah was born. Hannah married Stephen V Walley in the Dutch Reformed Church on 22 November 1806.

Stories:

1781 – 2 Jan – Apparently there was some doubt about the loyalty of Abner Darling to the American colonies during the Revolutionary War, as shown in Minutes of Commissioners for Conspiracies, State of New York. He was acquitted, but his reputation was probably tarnished. More research on this is needed.

Census Records

1790 – Census reported him in Hoosick, Albany County, New York[1].
1800 – Census reported him in Augusta, Oneida County, New York[1].
I have not found a death record for him nor a burial location.

Further Actions / Follow-up

Determine exactly when the Darlings moved to the Beekman Patent area
Research his wife, Hannah Carpenter (Reed?).
Learn more about Abner facing the Commissioners for Conspiracies.
Determine Abner’s death location and burial location.
Research Abner Darling in the Dutchess County Store Books.
Fully research the United States Revolutionary War Pension Records for Daniel Felton for additional information regarding Darling family line.
Research Mary/Polly Darling in Job Winslow’s will, Abstracts of Columbia Co., NY Wills. FHL MF 908922.
Read/Review “Tree Talks,” the quarterly publication of the Central New York Genealogical Society, Syracuse, NY. For information regarding Abner Darling’s will.

ENDNOTES

 

[1] “The Darling Family” by Frank J. Doherty. See http://www.beekmansettlers.com/ for details and ordering information.
[2] Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files; Daniel Felton – W 19259 – Page 4 – NARA – Fold 3 – https://www.fold3.com/image/17868586.
[3] Ibid.

 

———-  DISCLAIMER  ———-
Search for Ancestors at OneGreatFamily.com

Remembering Great Uncle Clarence Edward Huber

Happy Birthday Great Uncle Clarence

One hundred and six years ago, John and Bertha Barbara (Trümpi) Huber had the Christmas Eve present of their second child. Clarence Edward Huber was born on 24 December 1909 in Elberta and Josephine, Baldwin County, Alabama. Clarence didn’t grow up in Alabama as his family bought a farm in James Township, Saginaw County, Michigan about 1918 and moved there then.
Clarence went to school in Saginaw County and graduated from the eighth grade.
In 1942, Clarence enlisted in the army and served until his release in September 1945, when he returned to James Township and worked on his father’s farm until his father’s death in 1948.
For the next twenty years, he helped support his mother on the family farm until her death in 1968. He continued farming on the family farm until his death on 25 June 1994.
Sources:

1910 Census (A), Ancestry.com, Year:1910;Census Place:Elberta and Josephine, Baldwin, Alabama; Roll: T624_1; Page: 5A; Enumeration District: 0013; FHL microfilm: 1374014.
1920 Census (A), Ancestry.com, Year:1920;Census Place:James, Saginaw, Michigan; Roll: T625_793; Page: 4B; Enumeration District: 164; Image: 475.
1930 Census, Ancestry.com, Year: 1930; Census Place: James, Saginaw, Michigan; Roll: 1021; Page: 7A; Enumeration District: 0018; Image: 767.0; FHL microfilm: 2340756.
1940 Census, Ancestry.com, 1940 Census – Place: James, Saginaw, Michigan; Roll: T627_1811; Page: 9A; Enumeration District: 73-18.
BIRLS Death File 1850-2010 (Name: US Dept of Veterans Affairs; Location: Washington DC; Date: 1911;), Ancestry.com, Clarence Huber.
Lutheran (Alabama), Baptism Certificate, Clarence Eduard Huber.
Michigan, Deaths, 1971-1996, Ancestry.com, Michigan Department of Vital and Health Records. Michigan, Deaths, 1971-1996[database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1998.  Original data: Michigan Department of Vital and Health Records. Michigan Death Index. Lansing, MI, USA.
Michigan, Dept of Public Health, Death Certificate, Seeking Michigan, Clarence Edward Huber.
Saginaw News, Public Libraries of Saginaw, 1948-10-05, Page 19, Huber, John.

 

———- DISCLAIMER ———-

 

Bio – John Huber (1880-1948)

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 35 – John Huber (1880-1948)

By – Don Taylor

John is a great example of how further research of a person’s
friends can prove that you have wrong person all along. I wanted to increase my
understanding of John’s immigration and how he ended up in Wisconsin when I
thought he was headed for Oregon. I had him arriving in 1901 aboard the SS St.
Paul with two friends. I decided to follow his friends and see what happened to
them. I found them in Oregon in 1910 and then I found another John Huber (born
about 1880) in Oregon as well. Oops. I know that my John Huber was in Alabama
in 1910, so the immigration aboard the SS St. Paul was clearly incorrect. I scrapped
the information I had about his immigration and will start anew.  Sigh…

Bio – John Huber (1880-1948)

John Huber was born 9 September 1880 in Windlach, Kanto,
Zürich, Switzerland. He was the oldest of five known children of Jacob and Kath
Stuckinger Huber.
Nothing is known of John’s childhood. However, in 1901 he
immigrated to the United Sates[1]. He
appears to have headed to the Swiss Colony area of southern Wisconsin where he
met Bertha Barbara Trumpi. 
The two were married on 2 March 1905 in New Glarus, Green
County, Wisconsin, probably at the Swiss Church, in an ecclesiastical ceremony
by Rev. A. Roth. The 1905 Wisconsin Census finds the couple living on a farm
that they rented in Primrose, WI[2], about
8 miles north of New Glarus.
In spring of 1908, they had their first child, a girl,
Florence Wilma Huber.
Sometime between then and December 1909, the young family
moved to Alabama where their only son, Clarence Eduard Huber was born. The
family is seen farming their own farm in Elberta and Josephine, Baldwin County,
Alabama in the 1910 Census[3]. The
1910 Census also indicates that John had submitted his First Papers for
Naturalization.
It is likely the Hubers succumbed to advertising directed
towards Swiss immigrants in Wisconsin and Illinois, which promised cheap land,
without snow and cold, in a Swiss Colony in Alabama. In any event, they bought
a farm in Alabama and worked it for seven to eight years. Then they bought a
farm from Jacob Spitz in James Township, Saginaw County, Michigan in 1916.
It doesn’t appear that John became a naturalized citizen. The
1910 census indicates that he submitted first papers. In the 1920 Census, he
was listed as an alien. The 1930 Census indicates that he was naturalized. However,
the 1940 census, once again, indicates he had only submitted first papers. It
is the recollection of his granddaughter that in the mid 1940s he indicated he
was still a Swiss citizen and “didn’t like America much.” That is not to say he hated America, rather, he spoke of Switzerland as if it were heaven. My suspicion is that
he never became a citizen and only went through the process enough to have
submitted first papers.
In 1929, his daughter, Florence, was married to Robert Harry
Darling.
The 1930 Census shows John, a poultry farmer, with his wife
and son, Clarence, living on the Farm on St. Charles road in James Township.
In 1934, Florence died leaving a granddaughter to be raised
by her widower. 
The 1940 Census finds John, Bertha, and son, Clarence,
living in the same house as they did in 1935 (and 1930). John owned the farm
worth about $4000 in 1940[4].
The daughter of Florence (their granddaughter) would come to live with him and his wife in the 1940s.
John died on 5 Oct 1948 from a lingering illness at St.
Luke’s Hospital in Saginaw, MI. At the time of his death, he was a member of
the Evangelical Church.
He was buried at Lot S464, Section
116, in Oakwood Cemetery, Saginaw, Michigan.
Notes:

Do not confuse with Johann Huber from Switzerland who
immigrated in Nov 1901 aboard the USMS St. Paul and settled in Oregon.
Do not confuse with John Huber who owned 40 acres in
Bridgeport Township, Saginaw County, Michigan.

Further Actions:

·      Find John Huber’s immigration information.
·      Further research John’s Parents & Siblings 

List of Greats
1.    John Huber
2.    
Jacob Huber
(Jr. ?)
3.    
Jak Huber
(Sr.?)

[1] 1910; Census
Place: Elberta and Josephine, Baldwin, Alabama; Roll: T624_1;
Page: 5A; Enumeration District: 0013; FHL microfilm: 1374014. – Huber,
John

[3]  1910; Census Place: Elberta and
Josephine, Baldwin, Alabama; Roll: T624_1; Page: 5A; Enumeration
District: 0013; FHL microfilm: 1374014. http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1910USCenIndex&h=9295177&indiv=try
[4] Year: 1940; Census
Place: James, Saginaw, Michigan; Roll: T627_1811; Page: 9A;
Enumeration District: 73-18.

52 Ancestors: #1 – Elizabeth Jane Swayze Wisemen Darling

Bio – Elizabeth Jane Swayze Wisemen Darling

The Challenge:


Thanks to Caroline Porter’s blog, 4yourfamilystory.com, (A blog I subscribe to and read daily.) I learned of a blogging challenge issued by Amy Johnson Crow on her blog www.nostorytoosmall.com to post each week – that is 52 ancestors in 50 weeks. It can be a story, a biography, a photograph, or an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on a specific ancestor. I thought that I’ve been kind of trying to do that but I haven’t been as successful in keeping up that schedule.  So, I decided to take the challenge.  I thought, I’m probably good for now, I just blogged about my grandmother. I looked back at my blog and realized that I wrote Donna back on the 31st.  Closing out the year with Donna’s vaudeville activities was a great ending to the years.  I still have literally hundreds of documents and artifacts and gazillions of research activities I need to do to write her story, but, I didn’t want to ignore the other stories.  So, with the Donna blog last year and it already the 7th of January, I need to get busy.  Who to blog about was the next question.  
To help me with that I’ve decided to continue my past practice and write about someone whose birthday is within the following week. I also believe I have enough known direct ancestors that I can keep to direct ancestors and not need to do uncles and aunts. So, I opened up each of my research trees and printed a calendar for the next three months identifying the birth dates for direct ancestors only.  On weeks that I don’t have an ancestor whose birthday I know I’ll blog about the challenges in researching someone in particular.  This week, week 1, I start with:

Elizabeth Jane Swayze Wiseman Darling

Elizabeth Jane Swayze with born on 13 January 1818 in Rushville, Ohio.  She was the oldest of eight children born to David and Catherine Swayze. Her paternal grandfather, David Swayze (senior) fought for the revolution serving as a private in New Jersey.  Her parents had moved from New Jersey to Virginia and on to Ohio, where she was born.  In 1818, Ohio had been a state for about 15 years and had a growing population of about a half a million in the entire state. Rushville wasn’t yet a true village, but, it’s first church, Methodist, had been built as a log cabin eight years earlier and it was growing.  Actually, we aren’t really sure if she was born in Rushville or if that is where later documents indicate she was born because it was the closest town.  She may have been born in New Salem, Ohio, about eight miles away. 
In any event, in 1820, the Swayze’s lived in what is now New Salem, Ohio. Sometime before 1841 the Swayze’s moved to Kalamazoo, Michigan. In 1841 Elizabeth married Isaac Wiseman. By 1841, the Swayze’s were prominent in Kalamazoo. By 1846, Elizabeth’s father had been the treasurer for the Kalamazoo County Bible Society, on the Board of Directory for the First Methodist Episcopal Church, a member of the Kalamazoo Clay Club (a political party named after Henry Clay), a village trustee, and an “Overseer of the Poor” for the Village of Kalamazoo.    
Isaac married into a prominent family and things were looking great for the couple. Their daughter, Mary Catherine Wiseman (Kate) was born to them in late 1841.  Isaac died in 1845. 

Elizabeth quickly remarried. On August 27th,  1846, she married Rufus Holton Darling. 
Rufus was an up and coming young man from Rome, New York.  In the couple years Rufus had been in Kalamazoo, he built and opened the first store in Kalamazoo, the “Darling and Goss General Store.” Also, in 1945, Rufus had received a contract from the Michigan Central Railway to build the railway from Michigan City through to Grass Lake. 
Their first child, Abner C. Darling, was named after Rufus’s father, and was born shortly after the marriage. In September, 1847, a daughter was born (I’m sure to just confuse genealogists) that they named Elizabeth J Darling. In 1850, Elizabeth’s father, David, died.
Picture adapted from a screen shot of a map available for sale from 
In 1852, the couple experienced the joy of having twins.  Eva and Emily were born on the 24th of July. Only a year later, in 1853 tragedy struck; the twins got sick — deathly sick. I believe that it was tuburculous. Eva died and Emily never fully recovered. Emily was frequently sick and bedridden; she lived with her mother for the rest of Elizabeth’s life.  Although Rufus fathered a son, Rufus Harry Darling on June 20th 1857, Rufus’s (senior) remaining life was that of a sick man. Rufus senior died two months after Rufus junior’s birth of consumption. 
Elizabeth’s mother died in 1868. 
In 1869 Elizabeth’s daughter Elizabeth married Melville James Bigelow, a former grocer, windmill manufacturer, and then founder and vice-president of Kalamazoo National Bank.   
Sometime before 1880, Elizabeth’s older daughter, Kate, moved home to help take care of Elizabeth and Emily.
   
In 1881, Elizabeth’s daughter, Elizabeth, died. 
(Photo thanks to Find-a-Grave)
Elizabeth, the mother, lived at the northwest corner of Rose and Cedar from before the Civil War until her death, March 25th, 1896.  She, along with Rufus Holton, Emily, Eva, Elizabeth (the daughter) and Rufus Harry are all buried at Mountain Home Cemetery, Kalamazoo, Michigan.
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –
Sources: 
Because I upgraded from FTM Mac 2 to FTM Mac 3, my sources for this article are jumbled and corrupted.  (See my blog article.) It will take quite a while to correct the files, or else I will need to go back to FTM Mac 2 and lose any work I’ve done over the past few weeks on this tree.