McAllister – Surname Saturday

McAllister Name Origin

McAllister is an Anglicized form of the Gaelic name, Mac Alasdair, meaning “son of Alasdair.” Alasdair is the Gaelic form of Alexander. There are dozens of forms for this surname. My wife’s family line has records both under McAllister and McAlister (one “l”).

Geographical

Worldwide there are approximately 52,878 people who bear the McAllister surname. The vast majority, over 38,000, in the United States, with England and Canada being distant second and third (about 6,000 and 5,000 respectively). In terms of frequency, Northern Ireland has the greatest proportion of the McAllister surname, where one in 526 people have the surname. Scotland is the second most frequent area for people surnamed McAllister.

 

My Wife’s Direct McAllister Ancestors

Historical

1920

My wife’s great-grandmother, Hannah (McAllister) Darling died in 1913.

                     Peter McAllister’s Passport Photo

Her father, Peter McAllister, was estranged from his wife and was rooming at 2237 Salisbury Street in Pittsburgh, PA. In 1920, Pennsylvania had 146 McAllister families (about 6% of the McAllister families in the US). Peter, his wife Margaret, his son John, his son Edward, and his son Joseph constituted 5 of those 146 McAllister families.

Peter was my wife’s immigrant McAllister Ancestor. Peter had three sons, Frank, Edward, and John, all of whom immigrated to the United States in 1886-1887. A fourth son, Joseph was born in New York in 1889. Frank died young and I have only found daughters descended from John. Edward and Joseph both had sons that would have carried on the McAllister surname (and their Y-DNA).

1881

In 1881, Peter, and his wife Margaret, lived at 5 High Church Street in Workington, England, in 1881. He worked as an Engineman and the couple had two children at census time. According to Forebears, in 1881, there were 900 incidences of the McAllister surname in England and another 2,649 in Scotland.

Oral History

Family oral history indicated that the McAllister family was Scots. Although I have not found any ancestors (yet) that lived in Scotland, the family did live in Workington, Cockermouth, and Carlisle, all in the north of England. Workington is only about 20 miles from Scotland across the Solway Firth (part of the Irish Sea) and about a 42 miles drive to Gretna Green, Scotland. Cockermouth and Carlisle are even closer to Scotland.

Family oral history also talked of a “Black Peter McAllister” who was a blockade runner during the US Civil War. Apparently called “Black Peter” because of being bad.  Anyway, second great-grandfather Peter McAllister was too young to have been “Black Peter” (aged 10 to 15 during the Civil War).  However, his grandfather was also named “Peter.” Peter, the elder, would have been born in the late 1700s and is a candidate for having been involved in the US Civil War. I need to do more research regarding Peter McAlister, the elder. It would be great to find information regarding the McAllister’s being involved in the US Civil War.

My wife’s known McAllister relatives.

My records have identified 105 direct-line descendants of Peter McAllister (the elder).

Sources:

 

Donna at Family Theatre, Mahanoy City, PA – 30 Apr 1920

Donna Montran and “Chin Chin” play at the Family Theatre in Mahanoy City, Pennsylvania on 30 April 1920.

Vaudeville
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.It is not clear where Donna and “Chin Chin” played in the days before they played in Mahanoy City. We know they played at the Hippodrome in Pottsville, PA on April 26 & 27. It is unlikely the cast would have off two days in a row, particularly a Wednesday and Thursday.

Preshow Advertising

Advertising for the show began on April 24th with a page 1 announcement that the show was coming, on page 3 there was a official notification to “The General Public,” and on page 5 was a typical “Chin Chin” advertisement.

CHIN CHIN” COMING TO MAHANOY CITY FRIDAY, APRIL 30

Rich in color, pretty girls, artistic settings and the playfulness that goes with good musical comedy is “Chin Chin,” which comes to the Family Theatre, Mahanoy City, Pa., on Fricay, April 30th, night only.

A testimony of its worth is supplied by its past record of a solid two-year run at the Globe Theatre in New York City, and the summing up of the box office receipts in both the Metropolis and on tourr [sic] are convincing proofs of public estimation.

Ivan Caryll, composer of the music, is also responsible for the music of “The Pink Lady” and “The Little Café.” Anne Caldwell and R. H. Burnside wrote the libretto; Walter Wills and Roy Binder will be seen in the leading roles.

In this gigantic production of “Chin Chin” Charles Dillingham, the producer, offers more for the admission price than any other dozen musical shows ever seen. Seats on sale Tuesday.

On April 26th, the following article ran in the Republican and Herald.

“CHIN CHIN” AT MAHANOY NEXT FRIDAY

Charles Dillingham’s sumptuous and only production of “Chin Chin,” as seen for two years in New York, comes to the Family Theatre, Mahanoy City, Friday, April 30th.

This delightful and famous entertainment will be presented in its original entirety with Walter Wills nd Roy Binder in the lead. In this musically rich show such numbers as “Violets,” “The Grey Moon,” “Love Moon,” “Goodbye Girls, I’m Through” and the comedy song, “Go Gar Sig Gong-Jue” always receive hearty applause.

The book is by Anne Calddwell and H. H. Burnside, the lyrics by Anne Cldwell and James O’Dea and the music by Ivan Caryll, so well remembered for his ingratiating melodies in “The Pink Lady” and “The Little Café.”

Seven gorgeous settings make up this stupendous production—dresses, swift and grotesque dancing and lots of prankish amusement, including Tom Brown’s Clown Band as the famous Saxophone Sextette. Seats on sale Tuesday.

The newspaper on the 27th carried the exact same article.

On the 28th, a new article was presented. Much of it the same as the 26th and 27th. And on the 29, the exact same articles as what ran on the 28th ran again.

Finally, on April 30th, the “Republican and Herald” ran an abbreviated article which contained the same information as previous articles.


Family Theatre

Photo courtesy the Mahanoy Area Historical Society.

The theater was originally built in 1895 by John Hersker (Schone Horsker) and named the Hersker Opera House.  It also went by the name of Hersker’s Family Theatre and had a seating capacity of 1,250. In 1909 the theater was renamed the Family Theater. Later it was renamed the “State Theater.”[i]

Specifications for the Family Theatre

Proscenium opening: 34 ft
Footlights to back wall: 83 ft
Between side walls: 48 ft
Apron 5 ft
Between fly girders: 42 ft
To rigging loft: 63 ft

Nearby info

Nearby hotels included the Mansion House, Pennsylvania Hotel, and the City Hotel.

Today

After the building stopped being used as a theatre, it was a furniture store for several years. Today it is a gas station and mini-mart.


Disclaimer

The ads and some of the links on this website are “affiliate links.” If you purchase after clicking on them, I will receive a small commission which will help me pay for this site. Please see my <a href=”http://dontaylorgenealogy.com/disclaimer/”>Disclaimer Page</a> for more information.

Endnotes

[i] “Mahanoy Area Historical Society”. 2020. Mahanoyhistory.Org. Accessed January 15, 2020. http://www.mahanoyhistory.org/charter.html.

Ancestor Sketch – Emily S. Earle (1850-1926)

Bradley-Hingston Project
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.As I get to know an ancestor, it is my practice to look at an individual’s life in several passes. The first pass is, “Just the basics.” That is to say, determine the birth, marriage, and death of the individual. I expect to find the individual in each of the censuses during their lifetime.  As I do this first pass, I expect that I’ll learn many of the basic facts regarding the individual’s parents, siblings, spouses, and children. In most cases, I can find out all of these basic facts using Family Search and Ancestry alone. Occasionally, I’ll confirm a fact with another source, for example, an address not included in a census record which might be easily findable in a city directory. Additionally, I try to document any “odd” things that might need further research to understand.

Bradley/Earle – Ancestor #9

List of Grandparents

4.  Grandfather: Arthur Wilson Bradley(1887-1938)
9.  1st Great-grandmother: Emily S. Earle (1850-1926)
18.  2nd Great-grandfather: John H. Earle (1799-____)

Birth

Emma S. Earle was born on 6 June 1850 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She was possibly the tenth child of John H and Agnes (Cooper) Earle. John and Agnes had 11 children living with them over the years. I have not confirmed each of them, but I am reasonably sure of the relationships. Also, there were seven years between two of the children and another twelve-year gap between the last two, which suggests further research needs to be done on this family unit. Her father was a tailor; his shop was at 60 Walnut and they lived at 369 Cedar. Both parents were immigrants from England and all of the children were born in Pennsylvania.

The known siblings of Emily include:

Sibling Birth
Agnes 1825
Henry c. 1827
Ann c. 1828
John c. 1830
William c. 1832
Ellen Between 1839-1841
Catharine “Kate” c. 1842
Elizabeth c. 1843
Martha c. 1846
Emily S. 6 June 1850
Frances c. 1862

1850 Census

  • Although Emily was born after the official enumeration date for the 1850 Census, she was enumerated when the census taker visited on the 1st of August. The 1850 Census doesn’t provide for relationships between individuals in a household. In this census, it appears to be parents and 10 children from 25 years old down to Emily, aged “3/12.”
  • Twenty-three-year-old, Henry is an engraver, 20-year-old John is a carpenter, and 18-year-old William is also an engraver. Martha (12), Ellen (10), and Elizabeth (7) are all attending school.

1860 Census

  • Emily’s father, John H. Earle is still a tailor and his property is worth about $3,000. His personal property is worth about $600. Her mother, Agnes, is keeping house. Both her parents were born in England.
  • It appears that Emily’s (apparent) oldest sister, Agnes, and oldest brother, Henry, are no longer a part of the household. Thirty-year-old Ann (Annie) is still there as are William, Martha, Ellen, Kate (Catharine), and Elizabeth. Elizabeth and Emily are attending school.

1870 Census

The 1870 Census finds the family mostly intact. Ann, Martha, Emily, and Elizabeth are still in the household. There is another child, Frances, age 8, who appears to be a child of Agnes. It needs to be researched further to validate that as Agnes would have been 46 when Frances was born. It is possible that Frances has another relationship with the family that needs to be explored.

Finally, it appears that Kate (Catherine) married a “Becksby” and moved back to her parents with her two-year-old. That marriage, birth, and relationship needs confirmation.

Historically, shortly before Emily turned 21, Kaiser Wilhelm I and Otto von Bismark proclaimed the 2nd German Empire and Jesse James and his gang robbed the Obocock Bank in Corydon, Iowa.

Marriage

Emily married William C. Bradley on 6 June 1872 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The image relating to the marriage is available at a Family Search Affiliate Library. That image may tell us who married the couple and possibly infer their religion.

Ten months after their marriage, the first of their six children was born.

Child’s Birth Name Birth Date Death Date
William Earl Bradly 06 Apr 1873 27 Dec 1923*
David Cameron Bradley 17 Mar 1875 31 May 1913*
Marion Bradley 27 Nov 1877 05 Feb 1960
Walter Cooper Bradley Apr 1879 13 Feb 1913*
Emma Bradley 11 Jun 1885 Probably before 1900
Arthur Wilson Bradley 23 May 1887 05 Jan 1938

Sadly, Emily saw the deaths of four of her six children. A fifth child was admitted to a state hospital at the age of 25 and was an inmate until her death, 58 years later.

1880 Census

William and Emily did well for themselves The 1880 Census finds William and Emily living with four of their children on Prospect Avenue, in Philadelphia. William is a clerk and Emily is keeping house.  They also had two servants living with them. Seven-year-old William was attending school, but the other three were too young to have started school.

1900 Census

Sometime before 1900, the family moved to 608 North 17th Street. The current home at that location was built in 1925, so we can’t easily determine what the house was like in 1900. The family only had one servant but living with them was William’s sister Emma and Emily’s (Emma’s) sister Martha. William Bradley’s wife’s name was both Emma and Emily is evidenced by William and Emma(Emily) had been married for 28 years during the 1900 Census.

1901 – Death of William.

On August 6, 1901, Emily’s husband William died at home of a heart attack, “Angina Pectoris.” He was buried at Section H, Lot 251, at Woodland Cemetery, Philadelphia. Emily acted as executrix during his probate. The following year, Marion was committed to a state hospital.

1910 Census

By 1908, Emily had moved to 4073 Powelton Ave and is living there during the 1910 Census. Two of her sons, William & Arthur are living there. William is an Electrical Engineer for a Patent Attorney and Arthur is a linotype operator for the newspaper.  Emily’s sister-in-law Emma and her Daughter-in-law (Arthur’s wife) are living with her. Additionally, there is still one servant, Mary Rowan, an immigrant from Ireland.

1913

Nineteen Thirteen was a bad year. Her son David died at the age of 38 from Pneumonia and her son Walter committed suicide at the age of 33.

1920 Census

Sometime after 1913 and before the 1920 census, Emily moved from Philadelphia to 67 West Greenwood Ave., Lansdowne, Delaware County, Pennsylvania. Emily is living there with her 81-year-old sister Martha and her 69-year-old sister-in-law, Emma.

Deaths

Emily’s sister, Martha, died in 1922 and Emily died on April 3, 1926. She was buried with her husband William at Section H, Plot 251, at Woodlands Cemetery in Philadelphia.

Events by Location

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania – Birth, 1850, 1860, and 1870 censuses, marriage, 1880, 1900, and 1910 censuses.

Landsdowne, Pennsylvania (about 6 miles west of downtown Philadelphia) – 1920 census and death.

Further Actions / Follow-up

  • Determine the Church or Religion. Was Emily baptized or confirmed?
  • Confirm the relationship of Frances to John & Agnes.
  • Confirm the marriage of Catherine to a “Becksby” and the birth of her child.
  • Get a copy of the marriage record for Emily and William via an Affiliate Library.
  • Determine the death date of Emma Bradley (born 1885).
  • Learn about the reason for Marion’s hospitalization.
  • Review Emily’s death for probate.

————– Disclaimer  ————–

Continue reading “Ancestor Sketch – Emily S. Earle (1850-1926)”

“Chin-Chin” at Hippodrome, Pottsville, PA on April 26 & 27, 1920.

Donna and “Chin Chin” play at the Hippodrome in Pottsville, Pennsylvania on 24 & 25 April 1920.

Donna Montran
Vaudeville
Chin Chin

My grandmother, Donna Montran, joined the cast of the vaudeville show “Chin Chin” on October 30, 1919, and toured with the production until the production ended playing on May 31, 1920.  

Before the cast of “Chin-Chin” arrived at Pottsville, they had had a tough series of one-night shows and were probably pleased to have off on Sunday, April 25th before playing at the Hippodrome in Pottsville, PA. Also pleasing to the cast had to have been they would play at Pottsville for two days in a row.

“The Hippodrome” that must be the place where Hippo’s roam. That sounds good but isn’t right. The word “Hippodrome” comes from a Greek word, hippos, which means horse, and dremon, meaning path or way.[i] I doubt very much that horses ever raced at the Hippodrome in Pottsville, however, Mademoiselle Falloffski surly rode her horse in circles on stage during the production of “Chin-Chin” at the Hippodrome.

Continue reading ““Chin-Chin” at Hippodrome, Pottsville, PA on April 26 & 27, 1920.”

Donna Darling Collection – Part 56

Majestic (Harrisburg, PA) and York Opera House (York, PA)

Treasure Chest Thursday
Vaudeville
Donna Darling & Boys
By Don Taylor

For this week’s Treasure Chest Tuesday, I’m looking at three clippings from one page (0110) of the Donna Darling Collection.

Majestic Theatre

The first two clippings relate to Donna’s playing at the Majestic Theatre.

The first is a simple ad.

MAJESTIC
The Talk of the Town

Frederick V. Bowers
Popular Musical Comedy
Star and Song Writer,
In His
The first is a simple ad.
With a Bevy of Pretty Girls
— — —
COMING THURSDAY
Another Musical ComedFavorite
DONNA DARLING & BOYS

Sadly, nothing in this ad indicates which of the many Majestic Theatres this was nor does it indicate when. Luckily, an accompanying clipping on the same page provides a likely location and date for the show.

Majestic Theatre,
Harrisburg Pennsylvania
Week of April 3, 1922

MAXINE & BOGGY
The Comedy Dog

STEIFF PIANOS used in this Theatre

Spencer—CASE & MAYNE—Edith
In
“I WOULDN’T DO THAT”

Beautiful Musical Comedy Favorite
MISS DONNA DARLING & CO.
Assisted by Murry Walker and Jack Finney
In a Song and Dance Cocktail
“AS YOU LIKE IT”

MORGAN & MORGAN
“Making you Laugh”

MELODY LAND
In
Abbreviated “VARIETIES”
A Cycle Of
Songs and Dances
With
White and Mills
Juliet Beaumont
Kathleen Harrington
Ethel Cook
Assisted by

Olga Sirlis……………….Pianist
Martha Conwell …… Saxophonist
Charlotte Maloney…Violinist
Verna Dorn …………… Drummer
Scenery by Robert Law Studio
Staged by Douglas Royce

Newspaper articles, found at Genealogy Bank, confirmed that Donna played at the Majestic in Harrisburg on April 6th, 7th, and 8th. Also, in the Harrisburg Patriot on April 4th was the same ad in the clippings.

York Opera House

The third clipping is part of a York Opera House show.  No date is provided, but articles at Newspapers.Com confirmed that Donna played at the York Opera House in York, Pennsylvania, on April 3rd to 5th. The clipping shows many of the same acts seen in the Majestic clipping.

In place of Case & Mayne is:

Ralph                 Jim
KITNER AND REANEY
In “An Ocean Episode”

And in place of Morgan & Morgan was:

Lorraine         Verna
HOWARD & SADLER
Presenting their Harmonious
Comedy Songalogue
“Wedding Belles”

Program items A and B are missing in both the clippings, it appears that all other filler films started the two showings. For example, at the York Opera House, instead of “Case & Mayne” and “Morgan and Morgan” was the last chapter of “Breaking Through” and “Aesop’s Fables.”

Conclusion

The “Life of Madonna Montran” was updated with the following:

April 3-5, 1922 – York, PA – York Opera House – Donna Darling & Boys – News May 2019. DDC-56.

April 6-8, 1922 – Harrisburg, PA – Majestic Theatre – Donna Darling & Boys (Murry Walker & Jack Finney) in “As You Like It.” – Genealogy Bank – DDC-56.

Actions

  • Write about Donna playing in York, PA, and the York Opera House.
  • Write about Donna playing in Harrisburg, PA, and the Majestic Theatre.

Sources

  • Clipping: Majestic Theatre – Harrisburg, PA – Coming Thursday – SCAN0110
  • Clipping: Majestic Theatre, Harrisburg, PA – Week of Apr 3, 1922 – SCAN0110
  • Clipping: York Opera House – SCAN0110
  • Genealogy Bank – The Patriot (Harrisburg, PA) dated 4 April 1922, Page 14.
  • Genealogy Bank – The Patriot (Harrisburg, PA) dated 7 April 1922, Page 18.
  • Newspapers.Com – The York Daily Record (York, PA) dated 5 April 1922, Page 9.