Chin-Chin starts the new year at the Empire Theatre, Edmonton

Donna Montran and “Chin Chin” play at the Empire Theatre in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, 1 – 3 January 1920

 Vaudeville/Chin-Chin

We know Donna and “Chin-Chin” played at the Avenue Theater in Vancouver for three days beginning Christmas Day. There are still four days that we don’t know where the company was and it is unlikely that they would travel the 750 miles between Vancouver and Edmonton with no stops between. However, I was able to find “Chin-Chin” at the Empire Theater in Edmonton starting New Year’s Day.

Article transcription:

Edmonton Journal, Thu, Jan 1, 1920, Page 9.

BY PRESS AGENTS

CHIN CHIN AT EMPIRE

There appears to be no doubt that Mr. Charles Dillingham’s stupendous production of “Chin Chin” with Walter Willis and Roy Binder in the lead, will duplicate its record of absolute capacity audiences at the Empire theatre where it will open a three-day engagement with a holiday matinee today.

Though the title of “Chin Chin” suggests a Chinese setting, it appears that the scenes are not laid anywhere near the Celestial Land.

There is no leading lady in this organization, although a number of beautiful women, principals and otherwise, song birds and actresses are in the cast, it appears that the who is to enjoy the place of honor as first favorite is left to the choice of the public.

Tom Brown of the Six Brown Brothers’ famous Saxaphone clown band, composed “That Moaning Saxophone Rag” which is one of the hits of the play.

It is estimated that 250,000 people all from points more than one hundred miles from New York have already seen “Chin Chin” while it was presented at the Globe theatre in New York, and not Mr. Dillingham is actually bringing this his only company in its entirety to the Empire theatre.


CLEVER FANTASY
     “CHIN CHIN” HAS
           MANY BIG SCENES

Musical Comedy at Empire
Says Farewell
Today

Do you remember when you were just a tiny chap, how you would read the “Thousand and One Nights,” or the wonderful adventures of “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves,” and “Sinbad, the Sailor,” and all the rest of those fasci­nating characters, and how from out of them all emerged “Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp’* as the prime adven­ture of them all? And now Aladdin—a very modern Aladdin—very much in love with on American girl, appears in Charles Dillingham’s “Chin Chin,” which closes its engagement at the Em­pire theatre with matinee and evening performances today. In this musical concoction, everything comes Aladdin’s way upon wishing and rubbing the won­derful lamp, thereby causing many strange and wonderful situations.

Walter Wills and Roy Binder, as the two slaves of the lamp, keep the audience in constant laughter through seven scenes and the three acts that cover one hundred and fifty minutes of the most enjoyable fun.

Among the many features in this gigantic show are also the Teddy Bear Dance, Tom Brown’s Clown Saxophone Band, a real circus tent with an “honest-to-goodness” big white circus horse circling around the ring, while Mlle. Falloffski performs the most daring and screamingly funny bareback stunts.

Empire Theatre, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

The Julius Cahn – Gus Hill Theatrical Guide 1913-1914 indicates there were three theatres in Edmonton in 1913. All three were managed by W. B. Sherman. Bert Russell was the Res. Manager at the three theaters also. The theaters were the 1700 customer Sherman Theatre, the 1200 customer Empire Theatre, and the 900 customer Lyceum Theatre. Of the three, the Empire had the smallest stage, only 27×27 and 25 feet front to the back wall.[i]

History of Theater

Empire Theatre ca. 1919. Photo from the Glenbow Archives via LostYEG
(The Country Cousin was released in November, 1919.)

There were three different Empire Theatres in Edmonton.

The first Empire opened in 1906 at McDougal Avenue & Cristabelle Street (100th Street and 101st A Avenue. Three years later the building was abandoned and later demolished.

The second Empire was built as the Edmonton Opera House on 103rd Street north of Jasper and changed its name to The Empire about 1909. This was the theater that “Chin-Chin” played at in January 1920.

A third Empire was built in 1920 and opened in late December 1920.

Further Research

Learn the final disposition of the (second) Empire Theatre

Endnotes & Sources

[i] The Julius Cahn-Gus Hill Theatrical Guide 1913-1914; Page 695

Edmonton Journal (Edmonton, Alberta, Canada) Jan 1, 1920, Page 9 via Newspapers.com.

Today’s History Lesson – Pantages Vaudeville Theatre – Connect to Edmonton (Powered by Yeg Tel)

 

Donna in the News – Delayed by Train Crash on way to Fort Armstrong

Montran Monday

“Donna in the News” is my reporting of newly found newspapers articles and advertising regarding my grandmother, Madonna Montran (aka Donna Montran and aka Donna Darling). I am always excited when I learn of a new venue for my grandmother’s exciting show business career of the 1910s and 1920s.

Three New Venues discovered.

Another great week of Donna in the News with three new venues discovered and an intriguing note about Donna having been in a train crash.

The Rock Island Argus (Rock Island, Illinois) newspaper dated 29 March 1924 shows that Donna Darling and company played in a song and dance revue at the Fort Armstrong theatre. In another article, from March 31st, the paper indicated that she missed her first show at the Fort Armstrong because of a train crash. I wonder how bad of a crash was it? The crash has the potential of making another great story. I’m looking forward to additional research.

Next, is an ad from the News Record (Neehah, WI) newspaper dated 5 December 1924. The ad shows that the California Motion Picture Bathing Beauties, featuring Donna Darling played at the Neehah theatre on December 8 & 9.

Finally, from the The Record (Hackensack, NJ) dated 23 February, I learned that Donna Darling and Company played at the Lyric Theatre in Hackensack, for three days beginning February 24th.

Three new venues added to her Career List:

  • March 29, 1924 – Rock Island, Illinois – Fort Armstrong – Donna Darling & Company. com
  • December 8-9 – Neenah Theatre, Neenah, Wisconsin – Bathing Beauties featuring Donna Darling. com
  • February 24-26, 1927 – Lyric Theatre, Hackensack, New Jersey, Donna Darling & Co. com

Chin-Chin in the News – 1 Jan 1920 – Edmonton, Alberta

Date: January 1, 1920 – Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Empire Theatre

Vaudeville/Chin-Chin

My grandmother was a vaudeville star and I am following her career, trying to learn of her many performances. In October 1919, she joined the cast of the Charles Dillingham production of “Chin-Chin.” “Chin-Chin” played in the US and Canada until June 1920. I monitor several newspaper services watching for new venues that the show played at while she a was a cast member.

This week I found an article in the Edmonton Journal (Edmonton, Alberta, Canada) dated Jan 1, 1920 (via Newspapers.Com).

Edmonton Journal, Thu, Jan 1, 1920, Page 9.

Article transcription:

BY PRESS AGENTS

CHIN CHIN AT EMPIRE

There appears to be no doubt that Mr. Charles Dillingham’s stupendous production of “Chin Chin” with Walter Willis and Roy Binder in the lead, will duplicate its record of absolute capacity audiences at the Empire theatre where it will open a three-day engagement with a holiday matinee today.

Though the title of “Chin Chin” suggests a Chinese setting, it appears that the scenes are not laid anywhere near the Celestial Land.

There is no leading lady in this organization, although a number of beautiful women, principals and otherwise, song birds and actresses are in the cast, it appears that the who is to enjoy the place of honor as first favorite is left to the choice of the public.

Tom Brown of the Six Brown Brothers’ famous Saxaphone clown band, composed “That Moaning Saxophone Rag” which is one of the hits of the play.

It is estimated that 250,000 people all from points more than one hundred miles from New York have already seen “Chin Chin” while it was presented at the Globe theatre in New York, and not Mr. Dillingham is actually bringing this his only company in its entirety to the Empire theatre.

New Venue Added:

Jan 1-3 – Edmonton, Alberta Canada, Empire Theatre – “Chin-Chin”

 

“Chin Chin” plays – Rex Theatre – Chippewa Falls, WI – 11 Feb 1920

Donna Montran and “Chin Chin” play at the Rex Theater in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, on 11 February 1920

 We know that “Chin Chin” played at the Metropolitan Opera House in Minneapolis from February 1st through the 7th. I do not have any known venues the 8th, 9th, or 10th, but on the 11th, “Chin Chin” played at the Rex Theater in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin.

Preshow Advertising

Newspapers Mentioned “Chin Chin” was arriving on the 4th of February.[i] A standard full column ad played on February 6th, as did the familiar Wills, Binder, and Girls looking like Brussel sprouts on the stars’ queues.

An article the day before the show said

“Chin Chin” a Show of Good Music

Chippewa Herald (Chippewa Falls, WI) · 07 Feb 1920, Page 5. via Newspapers.Com

The music of Ivan Caryll, which serves to illustrate the story of “Chin Chin” which comes to the Rex tomorrow and in which Walter Wills and Roy Binder demonstrate their wonderful powers of drollery, to say nothing of their skill in dancing, is a demonstration of the wisdom of serving the best kind of music even to an extravaganza. “Chin Chin” is one more proof that good music pays. Music and dancing are so closely allied in these latter days.

Ethel Lawrence as “Violet Bond” the American girl in “Chin Chin,” is a charming little actress and always succeeds in winning the good graces of the audience. Her rendition of the duet, “Love Moon,” with the aid of George Usher as Aladdin, is one of the particular bright spots of the show. We advise that you procure your tickest now. The sale is heavy and the theatre management cannot guarantee to hold any reservations after 6 p. m. Wednesday.

Reviews

The day after the show, the Chippewa Herald reported that:

“Chin Chin” proves Fine Attraction.

Capacity House Pleased with Production at Rex Theatre Last Evening.

Chin Chin came up fully to all expectations….

Theater

The Rex Theatre was originally built in 1906 and named the Victor Theatre. The Victor was a modest theater with a seating capacity of 900 people.  The theatre changed its name to the Rex Theater sometime between 1918 and 1920, when “Chin Chin” played there.

Ravoli Theater. Photo courtesy Tiny LouRugani via Cinema Treasurers.

 In 1930, the theater was renovated for motion pictures, and was reopened as the “Ravoli Theater.” The Ravoli closed sometime before 1960. The building was demolished by 1962.[ii] Today, the location is a Holiday Gas Station.

Endnotes

[i] Chippewa Herald (Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin) · 04 Feb 1920, Wed · Page 3

[ii] Internet: Cinema Treasures: Rivoli Theatre  http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/48876

Donna & the Victory Theater, Dayton, Ohio

Donna Montran and “Chin Chin” play at the Victory Theater in Dayton, Ohio on April 2nd & 3rd, 1920.

 By Don Taylor

On April 1st, “Chin Chin” played at the Grand Opera House in Canton, Ohio. The troupe then traveled 200 miles to the southwest to Dayton and the beautiful Victory Theater.

The Dayton Daily News of March 28th, advertised the show was coming – Friday and Saturday April 2 & 3 – Matinee Saturday.

Chin Chin Ad – Source Dayton Daily News, March 28, 1920, Page 25.

Advertising let potential patrons know that the show was:

“The only company presenting in the original entirety the Greatest American Musical Comedy Charles Dillingham’s “Chin Chin” with Walter Wills and Roy Binder. Two Years at the Globe Theater, N.Y. Clean and Wholesome Fun – Running over with clever acts, “Chin Chin” has a name of Magic-Music That Is Sorcery – Nifty Little Chinese Maids – Toys – Coolies – Bears – A Real Circus Tent – Clowns – Bareback Riders – Grotesque Dancing A-Plenty and Tom Brown’s Clown Saxophone Band. “

Other advertising before the show was consistent with advance advertising at other venues.

Reviews

The show of April 2nd was not well received. James Muir wrote for the Dayton Daily News, probably, the most scathing review of “Chin Chin” I have ever read. In the midst of his tirade, he does mention that Donna has a “fair voice.”

Dayton Daily News (Dayton, Ohio) · 03 Apr 1920, Sat · Page 8
AMUSEMENTS

Inferior Company at Victory Is Presenting “Chin Chin”

By James Muir

We have always believe there is nothing so bad but that it might be worse. But that was before we witnessed “Chin Chin” Friday night at the Victory theater and found it to be a production sunk in the abysmal depths of putridity. Had it been the offering of Thursday we might have considered it an April Fool joke and laughed with gusto and admitted that the joke was on us. But since it came too late to be taken in the spirit of fun, we will have to review it, albeit with tongue in cheek, and thus unburden our tale of woe.

Perhaps the least said about such shows the better, silence sometimes being an expression of contempt. But it would be straining the quality of mercy to pass it by, besides doing an injustice to the readers who are guided in their theater attendance, to some extent, by the reviews in the newspapers. So for them, we say that if you expect the Clown Band of Saxophonists, which is really good, there is little left to the show.

At the close of the second act at least 50 people left the theater. The expression on their faces gave them the appearance of a lodge of sorrow leaving the home of some deceased brother.

“These people are not actors, they’re murderers,” fumed one young man as he left the theater with his lady escort. Perhaps he was stewing over the $5.50 which he had paid for his seats.

Evidently, she was too exasperated to answer him.

“The critics are all that will be left,” laughed another, as the people continue to file out.

“Well why don’t you go too?” asked his friend.

“Oh, it’s warm here, at least,” he replied. “Besides the circus scent in that second act left me almost unconscious. I’ll have to get back my strength before I go home.”

We are tempted to continue in this strain still further, even though we are mindful that this is not good criticism and that it is much easier to be a foolish jester than a wise critic. And yet, one much laugh in order to keep from crying. This is the American way of letting off steam.

For to take “Chin Chin” seriously is to tell the truth about it; to state that it has the rancid odor of the tanks; to become querulous and ill-natured because in this large and numerically impressive company there is hardly a good voice, and hardly a situation intended for comedy that is not spoiled by the two gloom dispensers, Walter Wills and Roy Binder. They are the successors of Montgomery and Stone, for whom the three-act musical fantasy was written by Anne Caldwell and R. H. Burnside, with music by Ivan Caryll. Wills attempts to imitate Stone and Binder to imitate Montgomery, with disastrous results, of course. Indeed Wills has nothing to give but some of the clownish movement of Fred Stone, for he is quite lacking in the mirthful spirit of that great comedian. He almost ruins the clever fake ventriloquial scent by his inane manner of repeating, “Very good, Eddie, very good.” However, to give the devil his dues he does some capable dancing in the Dance Poetique number with Irene McKay, receiving some well-deserved applause for his accomplishment.

Discover you family history through historical newspapers at Newspapers.comAs for the other twenty or more principals, we can only say that most of them hardly know the rudiments of acting, much less how to recite lines, sing songs and win laughter. To run down the list of the bad ones would take too long. So we will mention only a few who are somewhat better than the others. Starr Dunham, as Aladdin, is the best of these. He has a good voice and he renders quite well. Donna Montran, the goddess of the lamp, is a beautiful blond with a fair voice. Carrie Dale as Widow Twankey, as some personality but no opportunity to do anything. Ethel Lawrence assists Dunham in his singing of the tuneful “Love Moon” in an acceptable manner.

“Chin Chin” is an extravaganza built around the Arabian Nights story of Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp. It is big and showy from a scenic standpoint, though, of course, no settings look fresh after six years of wear. But it was never a very sprightly entertainment in itself, being wholly dependent upon Montgomery and Stone who could make almost anything go. So, when Montgomery died and Stone went into another production, “Chin Chin” should have been shelved or put on one of the cheaper circuits At the present price and with the present company, Charles Dillingham is taking money under false pretenses. A much better company presented “The Red Mill” at the old National theater at a top price of 75 cents, after Montgomery and Stone had discarded it.

Ouch. That was painful to read. In defense of the cast, they had been on the road ten months at this point. They typically did ten or more shows a week in four or five different cities. It had to have been totally exhausting. Luckily, the show only ran a few more weeks, ending in May 1920.

After the showing in Dayton, the troupe continued on and performed at Camp Sherman, (Chillicothe) Ohio, 75 miles to the southeast the following night.

Theater 

Victory Theater

The Victory Theater is one of the greatest and oldest theaters of America. The theater opened as The Turner Opera House in 1866. The theater burned in 1869 and was rebuilt in 1871 and renamed “The Music Hall.” In 1885, it became “The Grand Opera House” and in 1899 was renamed the “Victoria Opera House.”  In 1903, it became the “Victoria Theater.”

In 1913, the Great Dayton Flood severely damaged the ground floor of the theater. In 1918, the theater had another fire. At the end of World War I, the theater had extensive remodeling and reopened as “The Victory Theater” in 1919. In 1930, the theater was modified to support talking pictures. It was renamed the “Victoria Theater” after extensive renovations, in 1989, to outfit the theater expressly for performing arts.

Today the theater is operated by the Victoria Theatre Association. You can take a virtual tour of the theater on their website. It is a truly beautiful theater. They currently present productions of classics such as Adam’s Rib, The Princess Bride, and The Rocky Horror Picture Show.


 Endnotes