Sarah H Blackhurst Barber (1848-unk) – My Most Recent Immigrant Ancestor

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun

Montran/Barber/Blackhurst

Sarah B Blackhurst is my most recent immigrant ancestor. Sarah was born in England, most likely in Sheffield, Yorkshire, about 1848 (I think Dec 1847). I use the 1900 Census for the basis of birthdates because it indicates the month and year of a person’s birth in addition to his or her age. In Sarah’s case, the Census reports her birth as Dec 1867 but her age as 42, which would place her as born in 1857[i]. Consequently, I only pull the month of her birth from the 1900 Census. I then use the 1850 Census, in which she is two years old, and derive a  birth date of December 1847[ii].

The 1920 Census shows Sarah Blackhurst Barber’s arrival in 1850.
The 1850 Census also indicates that she was born in England and living in Detroit at the age 2 indicating an arrival before June 1850.  Additionally, the 1920 Census indicates the date of her arrival as 1850[iii], so, I’m fairly sure of that she arrived in 1850.  I haven’t found the family arriving in the United States in any immigration documents, so far but will continue searching.
Seventy-year-old Sarah is enumerated in the 1920 Census living in Manhattan, New York, New York[iv]. I have been unsuccessful finding a death record for Sarah thus far.

Further Action:

Find Sarah and family in immigration documents.

Endnotes

[i] 1900 Census (National Archives and Records Administration), Ancestry, http://www.Ancestry.com, Year: 1900; Census Place: Detroit Ward 4, Wayne, Michigan; Roll: T623_748; Page: 13B; Enumeration District: 36.
[ii] 1850 United States Federal Census, Family Search, Stephen Blackhurst – Auburn county, ward 4, Cayuga, New York, United States; citing family 1389, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.). Accessed 24 November 2015. https://beta.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCT2-GRX.
[iii] 1920 Census, Ancestry, http://www.Ancestry.com, Manhattan Assembly District 13, New York, New York; Roll: T625_1209; Page: 24A; Enumeration District: 958;
[iv] 1920 Census, Ancestry, http://www.Ancestry.com, Manhattan Assembly District 13, New York, New York; Roll: T625_1209; Page: 24A; Enumeration District: 958; Image:.
Randall J. Seaver, in his blog Genea-Musings, suggested this topic.

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James Robert Mannin (1867-1937) – Second Great Grand Uncle

James Robert Mannin  (1867-1937) – Second Great Grand Uncle
I don’t know much about my second great grandfather John William Manning. I thought I might learn more by researching his son, my great grandmother’s (Mary Elizabeth Manning Brown) half brother James Robert Manning. I had many questions about “Bobby” as ‘grandma Brown called him. My great-aunt Delores wrote to me in 2005 regarding “uncle Bob” and mentioned he had moved to Washington State with his wife Martha. Uncle Bob had two sons, Grant & Herbert that she knew.[i]
Holding Township is Northwest of Saint Cloud
Saint Anna is in Avon Township just south of
Holding Township. Source: Google Maps
I had seen him in a couple censuses so I knew something of him and his life, but not too much. The earliest place I find a record for him is in the 1885 Minnesota Census[ii]. It shows him, along with is sisters Mary and (Phebe) Jane living near Saint Anna in Holding Township, Stearns County, Minnesota with their grandparents, Enoch and Menorvi (Minerva) Mannan (Mannin).
The 1895 Minnesota Census shows Enock (Enoch) and Minerva Mannin living in Township 134, Cass County, Minnesota. Living with them are Robert, his wife, and their two oldest children, Pearly and Earnest R Mannin[iii]. Neither the 1885 nor the 1895 Minnesota censuses provide relationship information. That is probably why many people associate Robert as being the child of Enoch and Minerva when Robert would be their grandson. That Robert is not Minerva’s child is evidenced by the 1900 Census that indicates Minerva’s had nine children, five of whom were still living[iv]. Her children would have included:

John William – Died in 1888.
Isaac Wilson – Living
in 1900.
Nancy Ann – Living in
1900.
Meredith – Unknown – Presumed dead (No reverences to him
after 1870 Census)
Sarah Jane – Living
in 1900.
Mary Ermaline –
Living in 1900.
Gresella – Died in 1897
Prudence – Living in
1900.
Charlie – Unknown – Presumed dead (No references to him
after the Civil War).

By my logic, Robert could not have been one of Minerva and Enoch’s children. Therefore, there must be an error in the Family Search trees for Robert.


1900 – Had Robert and family still been living with Enoch and Minerva in 1900, the relationship would have been clearly identified. However, in 1900, Robert shows up as James R Mannin living as a farmer in Township 135, Cass County, Minnesota with is wife, Martha, and children. In 1900, Martha had had four children all of whom were living. They were:

         Pearlie Mannin           Daughter  Born: Mar 1892.
         Ernest R Mannin        Son            Born: Nov 1894
         Minnie Mannin           Daughter  Born: Jul 1897
         Nora M Mannin          Daughter  Born: March 1899

It is important to note that the wife and two eldest children have the same names and respective ages as in the 1895 Minnesota Census. This evidence helps establish that Robert Mannin was known as James R Mannin in 1900. We will also see that Robert James Mannin and James Robert Mannin, and parts thereof are used interchangeably throughout the years. In addition, Mannin and Manning are used interchangeably.

The 1905 Minnesota Census shows James R Mannin still in May Township, Cass County, Minnesota. He had been in the state for 21 years and in the enumeration district for 6 months. With him are is wife Martha and six children:[v]

Pearle age 13
Ernest R age 10
Minnie age 7
Nora M age 5
Clara age 4
Herbert age 1

The 1910 Census finds Robert J Mannin living in May Township, Cass County, Minnesota. Living with him are his wife and six children. It is interesting to note that Ernest R is E. Raymond in this census.[vi].

The 1920 Census find James Mannin with his wife Martha, his son Herbert, and another son, Frank (aged 7) still living in May Township. Also living with them is their daughter Nora, her husband Elde Wagner, and their son Arthur[vii].

James Mannin, Head, Owns Mortgaged, M, W, 53, M, Read, Write, Born Kentucky, Farmer, General Farm, Own Account
Martha Mannin, Wife, F, W, 49, M, read, write, Kentucky, 
Herbert Mannin, Son, M, W, 15, S, attended school, Minnesota 
Frank Mannin, Son, M, W, 7 4/12, S, Attended school, Minnesota
Elde Wagner, Son Law, M, W, 26, M, read, write, Minnesota, both parents Wisconsin, Farm Laborer, Working Out for wage.
Nora Wagner, Daughter, F, W, 20, M, read write, Minnesota, 
Arthur Wagner, Grandson, M, W, 1-9/12, Minnesota

1930 – Sometime between 1920 and 1930, James Robert Mannin and family moved to Yakama, Washington where they are found in the 1930 Census[viii]. With James Robert are his wife Martha and his youngest son, 17 year-old Grant. I believe that Frank and Grant are the same child; however, I am unable to confirm/validate that assertion so far.

Then on Rootsweb I was able to find “Davis Family of England, Ohio & Minnesota & McGuire family of Virginia, Kentucky & Minnesota[ix]” which included James Robert Mannin and his pedigree. It says he died on 22 Dec 1937 in Yakima, Washington. It provided his mother’s name of Evelyn Brynard and his wife’s maiden name as Martha Jane McGuire. I don’t accept these as new facts, yet; however, I do accept them as clues for further research.

Actions:

Open a discussion on Family Search to move Robert under John William and make him a grandson to Enoch, not a son.
 Continue researching James Robert Mannin’s parentage (particularly sources for his mother Evelyn Brynard)
 Research James Robert Mannin’s wife, Martha Jane McGuire. 

Endnotes:

[i] Various, Letters, Don Taylor, Maine, Letter – Delores Brown Pribbenow – 2005-04-04. I Delores Sarah Pribbenow. http://dontaylorgenealogy.com/2014/11/letter-of-delores-sarah-brown-pribbenow.html/.
[ii] 1885 Minnesota, Territorial and State Census, Ancestry.com, 1885 – Holding, Stearns County, Minnesota – Page 3 (Post Office: Saint Anna).
[iii] 1895 Minnesota Census, Ancestry.com, 1895 Residence place:  Township 134.
[iv] 1900 Census (National Archives and Records Administration), Ancestry.com, 1900 Census; Minnesota, Cass, Township 134, District 0048 Sheet 5.
[v] 1905 Minnesota State Census, Family Search, James R Mannin, May township, Cass, Minnesota; citing p. 1, line 17, State Library and Records Service, St.Paul; FHL microfilm 928,772. : accessed 20 November 2015). https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:SPSF-L9Q.
[vi] 1910 Census (NARA), Ancestry.com, Year: 1910; Census Place: May, Cass, Minnesota; Roll: T624_693; Page: 9A; Enumeration District: 0013; FHL microfilm: 1374706. Record for Robert J Mannin.
[vii] 1920 Census, Ancestry.com, James Mannin – 1920; Census Place: May, Cass, Minnesota; Roll: T625_824; Page: 8B;Enumeration District: 94; Image: 811, Line 51. http://search.ancestry.com//cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1920usfedcen&indiv=try&h=26517460.
[viii] 1930 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com, 1930; Census Place: Zillah, Yakima, Washington; Roll: 2524; Page: 4B; Enumeration District: 0047; Image: 796.0; FHL microfilm: 2342258.
[ix] Leslie Mikesell Wood, Davis Family of England, Ohio & Minnesota & McGuire family of Virginia, Kentucky & Minnesota (, 2011-04-21), Rootsweb.ancestry.com, ID: I156 – James Robert Mannin. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=mcguiredavis&id=I156.
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John William Manning (1846-1888)

Sometimes things get twisted in your tree.  I mean, I can see how it happened.  A wrong assumption here and a minor mistake there and before long you have a very interesting twist in a branch of your tree.  Such are the cases of John William Mannin and his son, Robert Mannin*.
“Twisted Tree…” Photo by Walter Baxter
[CC BY-SA 2.0] via Wikimedia Commons
First, I need to go back to where I realized the problem. I was documenting the life of my second great grandfather, John William Manning. I knew that I didn’t have a lot about his life. He died early, at the age of 41.  I’ve researched him many times and I knew there isn’t much about him available. So, I verified what I did have and I decided to research his son, Robert Manning. That’s when I realized I had things wrong.  First about John William Manning

John William Manning (1846-1888)

John was born between 29 August 1846 and 28 September 1846. We know this because he was 17 when he enlisted on 29 Aug 1963 for the Civil War and was 18 when he mustered on 28 Sept 1963[i]. His Father, Enoch Mannin (1823-1907) signed a parental consent for John to enlist on 29 August indicating that he was only 17[ii]. We also are fairly certain that he was the oldest of nine children of Enoch and Minerva Ann (Tolliver) Mannin. His Civil War record also indicates that he was born in Bath County, Kentucky. 
1850 – John W is 5 years old, living with Enoch (his father), Minerva (his mother) and apparently two siblings, Isaac Willson (age 4) and Nancy A. (age 10 months)[iii] in Bath County, Kentucky.
1860 – William is 15 years old, living with Enoch (his father) Minerva (his mother) and siblings Isaac – 12 (somewhat confusing as he was 4 in the previous census), Nancy – 10, Sarah – 5, Emaline – 4, and Grazelle – 2 in Bath County, Kentucky. Their post office was Owingsville.  Note he was called William in that census. He is also working as a farm hand.[iv]
Consent In Case of Minor for John W. Mannin
Signed by his father, Enoch Mannin
1863 – John W enlisted at 17 into 45th Regiment of KY on 29 Aug 1863. His father, Enoch Mannin, gave his consent to enlist. He mustered with Company E, 40th (Kentucky) Infantry Regiment in September.
1864 – He was captured by Morgan in May or June of 1864[v]. He was held at Lebanon in July and August and mustered out on 30 December 1864[vi].
1868 – It appears that sometime in 1867 he met someone, probably married, and had a son, Robert, between 1868 and 1869. In a letter to me, Delores spoke of her uncle Bob Manning, her mother’s half brother[vii]. Also, Mary Manning Brown’s obituary speaks of her half brother preceding her[viii].
1870 – I have been unsuccessful finding John W Mannin in the 1870 Census. That census could be key in determining who Robert Mannin’s mother was.
1878 – John’s First Daughter, Mary Elizabeth Mannin, was born on 17 April in Carter County, Kentucky, USA, 
1880 Census showing John Mannin
1880 – John was living in Pine Grove, Rowan County, Kentucky. He was a 34 year-old farmer. Rowan County borders Bath County and also borders Carter County where he enlisted for the Civil War, so his being in Rowan County is consistent with the rest of his life. The 1880 Census indicates him living with his wife Lisa J Mannin who was only 19 years old.  Also with them was a daughter, Mary Mannin, age 2. This begs the question, where is Robert?  He would have only been 12 in 1880.  Could this be the wrong John, Elisa, & Mary? 
1881 – The second big question about John’s life is the birth of his daughter, Phoebe Jane Mannin.  Phoebe appears in the 1900 Census as being born in January 1881.[ix]  
1882 – Some records indicate that John’s wife, Eliza, may have died in 1882.  Other documents indicate she may have died as late as 1888. 
1882-84 – Family oral history says that John was poisoned because someone knew he had $100 to send for Eliza’s keep.  Family oral history also indicated that Eliza died in childbirth.
Also, family oral history indicates that the children were raised by their aunt, Mary Ermaline (Mannin) Jones and uncle Thomas “Tommy” N Jones.  If this is true, it had to have occurred between 1882 and 1884.
1885 Minnesota Census for Enoch Mannon (Head)
1885 – Finally, we have a clear idea of where the children are.  John’s three children are living with his father, Enoch Mannin, in Holding, Stearns County, Minnesota.  Living with Enoch is his wife “Menorvi”, and three children, Robert, Mary, and Jane ages 16, 7, and 4[x] – These are the correct names and ages to have been John’s three children.
With so many conflicting stories regarding John William and Eliza J. (Fannin) Mannin, I felt it necessary to look at the three children of John & Eliza and see what I could find more. So, I decided to research John’s first child, Robert. I’ll write about my findings for Robert in my next posting.
Actions:  

Find John William Mannin in the 1870 Census.
Determine John William Mannin’s first wife, Robert J. Mannin’s mother. 
Follow Mary Ermaline Mannin Jones from 1870 -1900 and see if the John W. Mannin children show up there. 

* [Note: Mannin and Manning are used interchangeably in various documents depending upon the ear of whoever recorded the document. My use is also interchangeable. I tend to use the name used in a particular document to describe the individual.]

ENDNOTES

[i] American Civil War Soldiers (Historical Data Systems, comp.. American Civil War Soldiers [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999.), Side served: Union; State served: Kentucky; Enlistment date: 29 Aug 1863.[ii] Compiled Military Service Record, Fold3, John W Mannin. Declaration of Recruit, Volunteer Enlistment[iii] 1850 United States Federal Census (A), Ancestry, http://www.Ancestry.com, 1850; Census Place: Division 2, Bath, Kentucky; Roll: M432_191; Page: 36A; Image: 453.
[iv] 1860 United States Federal Census (A), Ancestry, http://www.Ancestry.com, 1860; Bath, Kentucky; Roll: M653_355; Page: 234.
[v] Compiled Military Service Record, Fold3, John W Mannin. Co E, 40 Kentucky Inf.
[vi] Ibid.
[vii] Letters from Delores Pribbenow, Don Taylor, Maine, Letter – Delores Brown Pribbenow – 2005-04-04. I Delores Sarah Pribbenow – See http://goo.gl/8U6c1q
[viii] 1983-05-09 (Est) (Probably Brainerd Daily Paper) – Mary Brown, 107 dies at Bethany., Unknown Newspaper, Minnesota.
[ix] 1900 Census (A) (National Archives and Records Administration), Ancestry, http://www.Ancestry.com, Year: 1900; Census Place: Wells, Wells, North Dakota; Roll: T623_1234; Page: 10A; Enumeration District: 214.
[x] 1885 Minnesota, Territorial and State Census, Ancestry, http://www.Ancestry.com, 1885 – Holding, Stearns County, Minn – Page 3 (Post Office: Saint Anna).
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She Kissed Politicians in 1915


The Massachusetts Republican leadership were all there. Several hundred had gathered at the Hotel Brenton near the shores of Bass Point. The year was 1915, and there were many issues to be discussed. Former Governor Foss was there, so was former Congressman Samuel McCall. Talking suddenly stopped as the lights turned down and a single spotlight showed a beautiful young woman who began to dance rhythmically to the sounds of the hidden orchestra. She paused to sing “A Little Bit of Heaven.” The politicians were entranced. The young woman danced up to Former Governor Foss, who had been Governor only a year before, and gave him a kiss on the cheek. She was also going to kiss Congressman McCall, but he raised his hand to his cheek so she kissed his hand instead. She danced away and then sang in her crystal clear voice, “I Didn’t Think You’d Care.” Finally, she danced away. None of the Republicans attending had a clue who the cute young woman was — just a mystery girl.

Donna Montran


A Boston Sunday Post reporter hunted her down and found out the identity of the mystery woman. It was Donna Montran. According to the story in the Sunday Post, Donna had run away from home when she was 14 and set off to seek fame and fortune. After she left her home in Detroit, she played the juvenile lead in “The Girl and the Keiser” then took on Vaudeville and the Keith Circuit. Fame and fortune didn’t turn the blond beauty and she consciously decided to abstain from drink and avoid partying. She wrote music and made a small fortune with a vaudeville show titled, “Montran and Drew.” The article goes on to say that Donna will be on tour in the West in a few weeks with her own show, “Donna Montran Summer Girls.” Donna boasted having a home on “Riverside Drive” and two automobiles. She says knows how to fly and she hopes to be able to fly one of the machines in the future.

The ¾ page article highlights the “girl who kissed politicians” with five photographs, including the one above.

Endnotes:

[Adapted from an article in the Boston Sunday Post, September 15, 1915. “GIRL WHO KISSED POLITICIANS IS FOUND! — Donna Montran, Who Ran Away From Detroit, Creates Sensation at Peace Banquet of Republican Moguls Held on Bass Point Shores.”]

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Donna Montran Biplane Flights – 1915

UPDATED 29 October 2015

On July 22, 1915, (Page 8) The Boston Glove reported: 

TO FLY OVER COMMON

Miss Donna Montran Expects to Drop Pennants and Tickets for Show From Biplane,
Miss Donna Montran, one of the pretty “belles of 1861” in “The Birth of a Nation,” at the Tremont Theatre, is anticipating the time of her life this afternoon, when she expects to make two round trips between Saugus and Boston Common with Capt J. Chauncey Redding in his biplane, incidentally showering “Birth of a Nation” pennants and free tickets for the Tremont Theatre on the heads of the crowd that will witness the flight from the Common. The two flights over the Common in the vicinity of the Tremont Theatre are scheduled, one for about 1:30, or not long after, the other a short time before the matinee performance is over, probably about 4:30. During the first flight the biplane will circle about above the State House dome.
Miss Montran will be attired similarly to the lobby girls at the Tremont Theatre, though without the hoopskirt. She will drop 100 pennants on the Common, 25 of which will have tickets for the theatre attached to them. The distribution will take place during both flights, and those who capture the tickets will be able to see “The Birth of a Nation” free of cost.

Sadly, she wasn’t able to make that flight.  The theatre was unable to get approval for the flight over Boston Common and the State House. They did, however, get approval to drop the pennants over Revere Beach the following Day. This was a really big deal and the Boston Globe covered it with a photo article on July 23rd. 
Source Boston Globe, Page 5, July 23,  1915
Free Tickets From the Sky via newspaperarchive.com
According to the article, rather than wearing a Tremont Theatre lobby girl’s outfit as reported she would the day before, she wore an aviator’s trim costume. Also, the article says, “On the descent of the machine Miss Montran expressed herself as delighted with her 50 minutes in the air.”

There were articles in other papers including The Boston Herald, 23 July 1915. 
Boston Herald,  July 23, 1915
Source: Genealogy Bank
“Actress Make Two Flights in Biplane.”  She flew in Capt. J. Chauncey Redding biplane on July 22nd.  
A google search for J. Chauncey Redding yielded a photo of the plane.  The photo was taken the week of 6 September, just six weeks after Donna’s flights.  If you wonder how dangerous was it to fly in a biplane in 1915, the pilot, Capt. J. Chauncey Redding, died on October 21st when his biplane collapsed while in midair while over the Lynn, MA, marshes.

Washington Herald
August 15, 1915
Source: Library of Congress

Another article appeared in the Washington Herald a few weeks later.  That article indicates that the plane was a Burgess-Wright aeroplane as reported in Aerial Age Weekly. It also mentions that Miss Montran was, “delighted with her fifty minutes in the air.”

I was able to find Aerial Age Weekly on-line at Google Books. The Washington Herald article is a reprint of the same article and provides no additional information..

J. Chauncey Redding’s aeroplane on the beach, Week of 6 Sep, 1915.
Photo: Courtesy Gertrude Palmer.
From HAMPTON: A CENTURY OF TOWN AND BEACH, 1888-1988
by Peter Evans Randall


Finally, I was able to find a photo on Wikimedia photo of the Wright Model B which was licenced to Burgess to make the Burgess-Wright Model F.  This was the exact type of aircraft J. Chauncey Redding used during Donna’s flight.
© Jarek Tuszynski / Wikimedia Commons / CC-BY-SA-3.0 & GDFL