Appleton Surname and My Appleton Ancestors

Appleton

Surname Saturday

Name Origin

Appleton is a surname based upon habitation, that is to say based upon where a person lived or came from. If it were Orchard, you would know right off; however, Appleton comes from æppeltun, Old English literally meaning “apple enclosure.”[i]

Geographical

The Appleton is said to come from England. The 1840 Census indicated there were 137 Appleton families in the United States. Fifty of them, or 36%, were living in Massachusetts.[ii]

My Earliest Appleton Ancestors

HERE LYETH BURIED Ye BODY OF
COL. SAMUEL APPLETON
AGED 70 YEARS
DECd MAY Ye 15th 1696
photo by: John Glassford via Find a Grave

My earliest known Appleton ancestor is my 10th great grandfather, Samuel Appleton. Samuel was born 2 Feb 1624 in Waldringfield, Suffolk, England. Some records I have indicate that he was a Junior, so I suppose his father, Samuel Appleton is my earliest known Appleton Ancestor, although I have no information on him, yet. When Samuel (the younger) was ten, his family came to the colonies and settled in Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts. He married Hanna Paine (1627-1656) and had two children, Judith and Samuel. Hanna died and then he married Mary Oliver and had two more children, Isaac and Oliver.[iii] Samuel died on 15 May 1696 in Ipswich, MA. He is buried in the Old Burying Ground in Ipswich. I believe his marker is the oldest marker of a direct ancestor that I know of.

Judith Appleton married Samuel Wolcott (1656-1695) in 1678.[iv] They had nine children, their eldest son, Samuel (1679-1734) is my 8th great grandfather.

My Direct Appleton Ancestors

#6562 – Samuel Appleton (1624-1696) – Generation 13
#3281 – Judith Appleton (1653-1741) – Generation 12
Wolcott – Four Generations – Generations 8 thru 11
Parsons – Two Generations – Generations 6 and 7
Sanford – One Generation – Generation 5
Brown – Two Generations – Generations 3 and 4
My mother – Generation 2
Me – Generation 1

My known relatives.

My records have 364 direct-line descendants identified over sixteen generations, which is 8% of my known Brown/Montran Ancestors.

ENDNOTES

[i] Ancestry.Com – Appleton Family History – http://www.ancestry.com/name-origin?surname=appleton
[ii] Ibid.
[iii] Find a Grave; Col Samuel Appleton, JR – Memorial# 38222231
[iv] Wolcott, Chandler, The Family of HENRY WOLCOTT

———- DISCLAIMER ———-
  

Cousin Dawn & the Appleton Ancestors

In the presentation I am giving next Wednesday evening at the Scarborough Museum on “Social Networking for Genealogy,” I emphasize the importance of connections. Connections with people and connecting with cousins are among the best. A cousin, who is into genealogy, cares about the accuracy of your family tree, particularly at your shared ancestor and beyond. They may also have researched areas that you haven’t and can provide great insight into potential sources and facts. I tentatively accept a lot of information from cousins; however, I flag the source and know that I need to try to find original documents to replace my tentative source as having come through someone else’s research.
An example of this is my cousin Dawn M. Through Ancestry.Com’s DNA test I had a match with a 4th to 6th cousin, Dawn M. (Not to be confused with my 1st cousin, Dawn M.) First, through Ancestry’s “Send Message,” then through direct emails, we quickly learned that our first common ancestors are Henry and Marion (Sanford) Brown. They are 2nd great-grandparents to both of us, thus making us 3rd cousins. According to Ancestry.Com, Dawn M. and I share 29.9 centimorgans across 4 DNA segments. It is really interesting to note that my half-sister, Glennis, and Dawn M. share more than double the DNA, 77 centimorgans across 5 DNA segments and is predicted by Ancestry to be 3rd cousins. Seeing that difference in shared DNA between Dawn M. and Glennis compared to between Dawn M. and me reinforces the importance of testing siblings as well to better identify DNA connections and improve the odds of finding the best possible matches. In this case, I almost didn’t pursue contacting with Dawn M because the suggested match was so distant (4th to 6th cousins).
I shared my tree on Ancestry.Com with Dawn and she shared a genealogy file she works with. It was 276 pages of information. Nearly overwhelming – No it was overwhelming. I decided to analyze her material based upon surnames. The first surname we matched alphabetically was “Appleton.” Samuel Appleton, Esq. and his wife Hannah are our 10th great-grandparents.
I had a lot of information she didn’t have, much of it from Chandler Wolcott’s book, The Family of HENRY WOLCOTT published in 1912. What is really good about that source is that it is available through the Internet Archive (a key genealogical research tool). Anyway, I sent her a link to the book and sent her an extract of the appropriate pages. Her information included the names and relationships for four 11th, four 12th, and two 13th great-grandparents. Just learning the names and potential sources for the information is huge and is a great beginning. Learning the probable names of 10 new ancestors is always a good day.
8 new ancestors thanks to 3rd cousin Dawn.
Altogether, just the Appleton section (15 of 276 pages) provided details, which I didn’t have before, on 25 individuals. As slow as I am, (I like to think of myself as thorough instead of slow) this is several days of verification and validation research, thirteen of which are direct ancestors.
2 new ancestor names
thanks to 3rd cousin Dawn
In all the Appleton material, there were only two minor items that were in conflict with what I have. Both these conflicts give me additional research areas so I can double or triple verify my interpretations of other sources. If I still disagree with Dawn M.’s assessment, then I’ll let her know my thoughts and why.
Thanks to DNA Testing, I found a third cousin, Dawn M. Thanks to communications with her I was able to assess that her unpublished tree. Thanks to that assessment, I have tentatively added twenty-five new ancestors. Yes, social networking can provide amazing results.  Five percent done, only 95% to go.