William Taylor & the 1910 Census

Census Sunday
Bradley-Taylor

By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.In my Bradley-Hingston Project, I’ve been researching William S. Taylor (1856-1928). For my genealogical “first pass” research for an ancestor, I attempt to find vital records, birth, death, and marriages. I also try to find the individual in all of the available Census records during their life.  In William Taylor’s case, I have not successfully found him the 1910 Censuses.

William was born on 29 December 1856 in Taylorsville[i], Bucks County, Pennsylvania, to Jacob H. and Rebecca L. (Pittman) Taylor. On 17 January 1887, he married Maria and they had three children, Dorothy, John, and Magdalen. William remarried Mary Ella Rulon on 22 November 1911. That suggests that John and Maria either divorced or that Maria died before November 1911. Additionally, Magdalen had married in 1910 was

William S. Taylor would have been 53 years old on 15 April 1910. He is probably either widowed or divorced.

Review of the 1910 Census

A Search of Family Search for William Taylor, 53 years old, born in Pennsylvania, yielded eight reasonable candidates.

    • William R. Taylor was the head of a household that included a daughter Annie. He had been married for 37 years but did work as a secretary for the railroad. My William married 23 years earlier and had no known daughter named Annie. This William Taylor is an unlikely candidate.
    • The William Taylor, who lived in Warrior Run, Luzerne County, PA, and was married to Rebecca, is not a candidate.
    • William D. Taylor, who lived in Philadelphia, had a son named Joseph and whose parents were born in Ireland, is not a candidate.
    • William F Taylor, who lived in Altoona, Blair County, PA, and had a wife, Agnes, is not a candidate.
    • The William R Taylor, who lived in Rochester, Monroe County, NY, and had a wife, Annie, is not a candidate.
    • The William C Taylor, who lived in Colwyn, Delaware County, PA, and had a wife, Anna, is not a candidate.
    • The Wm Taylor, who lived in Philadelphia, PA, and had a wife, Clara, is not a candidate.
    • William Taylor boarded with Mary R Tabor in Philadelphia, PA. His father was born in PA, and his mother was born in New Jersey. His occupation is Accountant at a Brewing Co. This William Taylor is a likely candidate. During the 1920 Census, William’s occupation is “Accountant.” Although he is listed as single, rather than divorced or widowed, I believe that is an error by whoever provided the information to the census taker.
William Taylor a lodger in the household of Mary R Tabor – 1910 US Census – Family Search

This look at the 1910 Census reminded me that there were other 23-year-old William Taylor’s living in the Philadelphia area, including:

      1. William R. Taylor, the father of Annie Taylor.
      2. William D. Taylor, whose parents were born in Ireland.
      3. William Taylor, whose wife was Clara.

Conclusion

In 1910, William Taylor was a lodger at 32 South 17th Street, Philadelphia. His occupation was as an Accountant at a brewing company.[ii]

Follow-up

I find it particularly interesting that the head of the household was the 47-year-old widow Mary R. Tabor. William’s second wife, who he married in 1911, was Mary Rulon (maiden name). His wife, Mary, also would have been 47 in 1910. Are the two Mary’s the same person? I will need to investigate that if/when I research Mary Rulon.


Endnotes:

[i] Taylorsville is now Washington Crossing, an unincorporated village in Upper Makefield Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. (About 30 miles north of Philadelphia and 8 miles upstream of Trenton.

[ii] “United States Census, 1910,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MGWN-5R4, accessed 17 February 2021), Wm Taylor, Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) ED 480, sheet 5A, family 87, NARA microfilm publication T624 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1982), roll 1397; FHL microfilm 1,375,410.

William Taylor & the 1880 Census

Census Sunday
Bradley-Taylor
By Don Taylor

Introduction

In my Bradley-Hingston Project, I’ve been researching William S. Taylor (1856-1928). For my genealogical “first pass” research for an ancestor, I attempt to find vital records, birth, death, and marriages. I also try to find the individual in all of the available Census records during their life.  In William Taylor’s case, I have not successfully found him in either the 1880 or the 1910 Censuses.

William was born on 29 December 1856 in Taylorsville[i], Bucks County, Pennsylvania, to Jacob H. and Rebecca L. (Pittman) Taylor. He appears in the 1860 and 1870 Censuses living with his parents as expected. During the 1870 Census, the 13-year-old William was attending school, as were all his school-age siblings, which means he could likely read and write.

In 1887, William married Maria Louisa Polk at St. Joseph Church in Jackson County, Missouri. That he was in Missouri is significant because it shows that William traveled across the country sometime between 1870 and 1887. He located back in the Philadelphia area with Maria by 1900, showing considerable mobility.

Review of the 1880 Census

A Search of Family Search for William Taylor, born in Pennsylvania in 1857, yielded 14 results.

  • William H. Taylor lived in Westport, Clinton, PA, with his mother, Sarah A. Taylor. Wrong mother.
  • William C. Taylor lived in Spring City, Chester, PA, with his Father, Samuel A. Taylor. Wrong father
  • William Taylor lived in Indiana, PA, with his mother, Margret Taylor. Wrong mother.
  • William M. Taylor was living in Saltsburg, Indiana County, PA. Race Mulatto. Wrong Race.
  • William Taylor was living in Dauphin County, PA, with his brother-in-law Armstead Lee. Armstead’s wife was named Mary. William did not have a sister named Mary, so this can’t be the correct William.
  • William Taylor lived in Philadelphia, PA, with his wife Elizabeth and son William (under 1). William’s parents were born in Ireland. Wrong birthplace for Parents.
  • William Taylor was living in Wayne County, PA, with his mother, Zilpha. Wrong mother.
  • William Taylor was living in Lewisburg, Union County, PA. Race Black.
  • William Taylor was living in Philadelphia, PA, with his parents William and Elizabeth. Wrong parents.
  • William Taylor was living in Philadelphia, PA, with his mother, Elmire Taylor. Wrong mother.
  • William A. Taylor lived in Philadelphia, PA, with his parents Samuel W. and Mary A. Taylor. Wrong parents.
  • William Taylor was living in Kansas City, Jackson, Missouri. His race is black. Also, his parents were both born in Virginia. The wrong person.
  • There was a (first name blank) Taylor living in Beaufort, South Carolina. A closer look at the census reveals that this person was black.
  • Finally, a William Taylor lived in Philadelphia, PA, as a boarder at 34 Lancaster, Philadelphia. Single, His occupation was “P.R.R Co’s Men.” Over 20 men were boarding there, all of whom were P.R.R. Co’s Men.[ii] (I presume “P.R.R” to be the Pennsylvania Railroad.[iii])
William Taylor in the 1880 Census – Philadelphia, PA – ED 485, Page 4 – via Family Search

This appears to be the only William Taylor that could be the William Taylor I am looking for. This determination conflicts with several other researchers; however, I am quite certain this is the correct William Taylor. Additionally, it provides a simple explanation about how William could have gone west to meet Maria, who was from Arkansas, marry her in Missouri, and remove to Philadelphia by 1900. He worked for the Railroad.

This look at the 1880 Census shed light that there were four other 23-year-old William Taylor’s living in the Philadelphia area.

    1. William A. Taylor, son of Samuel W. and Mary A. Taylor.
    2. William Taylor, son of William and Elizabeth Taylor.
    3. William Taylor, son of Elmire Taylor.
    4. William Taylor, son of Irish immigrants and married to Elizabeth with a son William.

It will be crucial to distinguish my William Taylor from these other William Taylors as I continue my William Taylor research.

Conclusion

In 1880, William Taylor lived in Philadelphia, PA, and boarded at 34 Lancaster. He lived and worked with many other employees of the Pennsylvania Railroad. 


Endnotes:

[i] Taylorsville is now Washington Crossing, an unincorporated village in Upper Makefield Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. (About 30 miles north of Philadelphia and 8 miles upstream of Trenton.

[ii] Family Search “United States Census, 1880,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MWJ5-XPR: 13 November 2020), Wm. Taylor in the household of J. L. Worrell, Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, British Colonial America; citing enumeration district ED 485, sheet 33B, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), FHL microfilm 1,255,182.

[iii] The Pennsylvania Railroad operated was established in 1846 and operated until 1968.

Isabella Atkinson & the Censuses.

Darling-McAllister-Lamb-Atkinson
Census Sunday
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.Following families in the early census records is always difficult and I find English Census records particularly difficult to follow.

To the best of my research, Isabella Atkinson (my wife’s 3rd great-grandmother on her maternal line) was born between 1834 and 1835 in Long Marton, Westmorland, England. She married Edward Lamb in 1853. So, during the 1851 Census, she should have been sixteen or seventeen years old and, hopefully, living with her parents. But alas, no such luck.

Isabella in the Censuses

1851 Census[i]

There is one Isabella Atkinson, born about 1835 in Long Marton, Westmorland, England.

She is living with the widow Elizabeth Wade at Church Stile House. Isabella is a 16-year-old “General Servant.”

1841 Census[ii]

Again, there is one Isabella Atkinson, born about 1834 in Long Marton, Westmorland, England. However, this census appears to have Isabella’s parents and siblings included. The 1841 Census does not provide relationships, however, this appears to be a nuclear family.

  • John Atkinson, 40 – Head – John’s occupation is “Husbandman” (aka farmer).
  • Elizabeth,        35 – Apparent Wife
  • Thomas,          16 – Apparent Son
  • Richard,           11 – Apparent Son
  • George,           9   – Apparent Son
  • Isabella            6   – Apparent Daughter
  • Ann                 3   – Apparent Daughter

Living in Township of Knock in the parish of Long Marton.
Superintendent Registrar’s District of East Ward.
Registar’s District of Appleby
Enumeration District 10.

Marriage

Isabella married Edward Lamb on 27 November 1853. Following her after her marriage we find.

1861 Census[iii]

We find Isabella enumerated with her husband in Warcop, Westmorland, England.

The family unit consists of:

  • Edward Lamb     29     Head    Mar      29     Victualler[iv]   Warcop,
  • Isabella Lamb     26     Wife     Mar      26                       Long Marton,
  • Margaret Lamb   11/12 Dau.    N/A      11 mos.              Warcop,
  • Dorathy Bradley  77     Visitor  Widow  77     Landed Proprietor  Warcop,

(Note: All were Westmorland.)

1871

I have been unsuccessful finding Isabella in the 1871 England Census. It appears that Edward may be living with his mother and two sisters in Sanford during the 1871 Census.[v] Margaret does not appear to be enumerated with Edward.

 1881

Again, I have been unsuccessful in finding Isabella in the 1881 England Census. Edward is enumerated as married, owns his house, and is a landed proprietor. He is also an annuitant. There is no evidence of Isabella with him. Edward and Isabella’s Daughter, Margaret Mary Lamb (1860-1929), has married and is living in Workington with her husband, Peter McAllister (1852-1941).

Conclusion

Edward and Isabella had two other children that were christened after Margaret. James Cooper in 1863 and Edward in 1864. I have been unable to find any records or references to Isabella after 1864.  Consequently, I believe she may have passed between 1864 and the 1871 Census.

Although I feel a sense of frustration not determining Isabella whereabouts after 1864, I am really happy to have determined the names of Isaballa’s parents and four of her siblings.  Maybe researching Isabella’s parents or her siblings will result in a greater understanding of Isabella’s life.


Endnotes & Source Citations:

[i] 1851 England and Wales Census – March 30, Ancestry, Isabella Atkinson (Servent) – Elizabeth Wade (Head) – Bongate, Westmorland, England. Class: HO107; Piece: 2439; Folio: 125; Page: 20; GSU roll: 87120. Description: Enumeration District: 7.

[ii] 1841 England and Wales Census – June 6, Various, John Atkinson – Knock, Parish of Long Marton, Westmorland. Class: HO107; Piece: 1158; Book: 1; Civil Parish: Long Marton; County: Westmorland; Enumeration District: 10a; Page: 1; Line: 1; GSU roll: 464189.

[iii] 1861 England and Wales Census – April 7, Ancestry, Edward Lamb – Class: RG 9; Piece: 3958; Folio: 8; Page: 9; GSU roll: 543213. Ancestry.com. 1861 England Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.
Original data: Census Returns of England and Wales, 1861. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Oice (PRO), 1861. Data imaged from The National Archives, London, England. The National Archives gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to The National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU. https://search.ancestry.com/collections/8767/records/13303817.

[iv] A victualler is traditionally a person who supplies food, beverages and other provisions for the crew of a vessel at sea, but also may be the landlord of a public house. | Retrieved 29 November 2020, from Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victualler

[v] 1871 England Census – April 2, Ancestry, Ann Lamb – Head – Sanford, Westmorland, England. “England and Wales Census, 1871”, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V557-7BQ : 28 September 2019), Mary Lamb in the entry for Ann Lamb, 1871. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V557-7B9.

Orson Barber of Calhoun County and the Early Censuses

Census Sunday
By Don Taylor

My 2nd great-grandfather, Franklin E. Barber, was born in Sheridan (Township) Calhoun County, Michigan His marriage record said he was 28 years old and when he married in Calhoun County in November 1869. Likewise, he lived in Calhoun County during the 1870 and 1880 Censuses.

  • 1841 – Born in Sheridan Township, Calhoun County.
  • 1869 – Married in Calhoun County.
  • 1870 – Census lived in Sheridan Township, Calhoun County.
  • 1880 – Census Lived in Albion, Calhoun County.

Because his known life events prior to 1897 all take place in Calhoun County, I am hypnotizing that he probably lived in Calhoun County during the 1860 and 1850 Censuses. Searches for him during these censuses have been unsuccessful, so I thought I’d take a closer look at Barber families in Calhoun County of the 1840s, 50s, and 60s. In the 1840 Census, there were two Barber households in Calhoun County, Orson and Thomas. First, I’ll look at Orson Barber and learn about him.

Orson Barber of Calhoun County, MI

1840 Census

Orson Barber’s household in Pinckney, Calhoun County consisted of:

  • 1 Male, under 5          [Asa J] v. (b. 1835-1840)
  • 1 Male, 20 thru 29      Orson b. (b. 1810-1820)
  • 1 Female, Under 5      [Clarissa A.] (b. 1835-1840)
  • 1 Female, 20 to 29      [Mary A.] (b. 1810-1820)

I was really confused by this entry. Pinckney is located in Putnam Township, Livingston County, Michigan, however, the 1840 Census apparently places Pinckney in Calhoun county, two counties away. Regardless of where Orson Barber and family were in 1840, they definitely moved to Calhoun county in 1843.

1843 – Land Purchase

On 1 February 1843, Orson Barber and Henry L. White of Calhoun County acquired 38.11 acres, the SE¼ of the NW¼ of Section 24 in township One (Clarence Township) South of Range 4 West.

Current map/view of Calhoun County showing where Orson Barber’s farm was in 1843.

1850 Census

The 1850 Census found Orson Barber and family living in Tekonsha Township:

  • Name              Age      Born                Occupation     Real Estate Value
  • Orson              37        New York        Farmer            (Blank)
  • Mary A.           35        Connecticut
  • Clarissa A.       14        New York
  • Asa J.               12        New York        Attended School ¼
  • Harriet L.         5          Michigan         Attended School

1860 Censuses

Orson Barber – The 1860 Census found Orson living in Clarence Township.

  • Name              Age      Born                Occupation     Real Estate Value
  • Orson              49        New York        Farmer            $900
  • Mary A.           46        Connecticut    Housekeeper
  • Asa J.               22        New York        Farmer Labour
  • Harriet L.         15        Michigan         Domestic
  • Martha            20        Michigan         Domestic
  • Frances A.       5          Michigan

It appears that Clarissa is no longer in the household (married, moved, or died).

It appears that Asa married Martha and had a daughter, Frances.

Orson’s farm value in 1860 was the second lowest of the five farms on the census page, which ranged from $800 to $4,000. Still, his farm had 120 acres, 80 of which was improved.

1870 Census

None of the Orson Barber family appear in the 1870 Census in Calhoun County, Michigan. Other researchers suggest he located to Ingham County, Michigan, and he died and was buried there in 1893.

Facts of Orson Barber’s Life

  • 1813 – Orson Barber was born between 1810 and 1813 in New York.
  • 1835 – He married Mary A. [LNU] about 1835.
  • 1836 – His daughter Clarissa was born in New York.
  • 1838 – His son Asa was born in New York.
  • 1840 – He was enumerated in Calhoun County.
  • 1843 – He purchased 38 acres in Clarence Township, Calhoun County, Michigan.
  • 1845 – His daughter Harriet L. was born in Michigan.
  • 1850 – He was farming in Tekonsha Township, Calhoun County, Michigan.
  • 1860 – He was farming in Clarence Township, Calhoun County, Michigan.
  • 1893 – He died in Ingham County, Michigan.

Orson Barber appears in the Agriculture Schedules for 1850 and 1860.

  • Items                             1850    1860
  • Acres Improved            35        80
  • Acres Unimproved      20        40
  • Cash Value of Farm    400      900
  • Value Imp. & Mach.    40        60
  • Horses                            –           2
  • Asses & Mules            –
  • Milch Cows                 2          3
  • Working Oxen            –
  • Other Cattle                –           6
  • Sheep                            –           40
  • Swine                            –           6
  • Value of Live tock       25        252
  • Wheat                             50        150
  • Rye                                 –
  • Indian Corn                 40        250
  • Oats                                              140
  • Rice                               –
  • Tobacco                      –
  • Cotton
  • Wool                                             130

Although it appears that Orson moved around, he seems to have improved with each move. Certainly, his original 38 acres in Clarence Township was unimproved in 1843. By 1850, he had 55 acres, 35 acres had been improved in Tekonsha Township. And by 1860 he had 80 improved acres out of 120 total back in Clarence Township.  Without a doubt, Orson had a prosperous life.

Arthur Brown in the Censuses

Census Sunday
Brown Line
By Don Taylor

Introduction

I have long believed that Arthur Durwood Brown, my great-grandfather was the son of William Henry Brown and not the son of Henry Mack Brown. I think that the 1870 and 1880 Census records contribute greatly to that belief.

1870 Census

Other records have long identified that Arthur Durwood Brown was born in December 1869 and the Census Record for Arthur confirms that. It shows the Henry Brown family as consisting of any apparent husband and wife with two children.[i] Henry is a farm laborer and Marian is keeping house. Children Nittie and Arthur are 3 years and 7/12 years old respectively. Because Arthur was born during the previous year, his month of birth, “Dec,” was also enumerated. Twenty-five-year-old Henry is a farm laborer and 23-year-old Marian is keeping house.  There is no entry for Henry owning property.

Immediately following Henry and family are William Sanford, his wife Mary and four apparent children. William’s farm is the most valuable farm on the page, valued at $10,000. So, it appears to me that Henry, who is married to William’s daughter, is most likely a farm hand on William’s farm.

1870 Census – Henry Brown & William Sanford – Detail

1880 Census.

The 1880 Census is the first census which shows the relationship between individuals. Henry Brown is the head of the family, Marian is his wife, and 10-year-old Arthur is enumerated with his younger siblings, Charles, Mary, Almond, Clifford, William, Clyde, and Addison. Nittie, who should be 13 during the 1880 Census, isn’t enumerated.

1880 Census – Henry Brown – Detail
1880 Census – Marion Brown & Children – Detail

William Sanford’s family is enumerated on the same page as Marian as in the 1870 Census.

1890 Census

Not available.  Please see: Census.Gov > History > Genealogy > Decennial Census Records > Availability of 1890 Census.

1900 Census

The 1900 Census finds Arthur D. Brown married with children living in Township 136, Ranges 25-29, Crow Wing County Minnesota. The census reports that he was born in December, 1870, and was 29-years-old—A minor error. He had been married for seven years and had three children. His 21-year-old wife, Mary, had had four children, one who had died.[ii] The three children enumerated were.

      • Clyde             Born Feb 1894
      • Victoria        Born June 1896
      • Clarence      Born Dec 1897

1910 Census

The 1910 Census finds the Arthur Brown household had moved west to North Dakota and lived near Merkle, Kidder County. With him are his wife, daughter Victoria and his three youngest (at the time) children, Cora, Clifford (my grandfather), and Edward. There is an eight year gap between Clifford and Edward, suggesting a lost child.[iii]

1920 Census

The 1920 Census finds the Arthur Brown household had moved back to Minnesota and were renting a home in Sylvan Township, Cass County. With him are his wife, Mary, and five children, Clifford (my grandfather), Edward, Arthur, Charles, and Delores.

Death

Arthur Durwood Brown died on 27 August 1928 in Walker, Cass County, Minnesota. He is buried in Gull River Cemetery, Pillager, Cass County, Minnesota.


Sources

  • 1870 Census (NARA), 1870 – Henry Brown – Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan. “United States Census, 1870”, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MHC NMT : 19 March 2020), Arthur Brown in entry for Henry Brown, 1870.
  • 1880 Census, 1880 – Henry Brown – Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan. “United States Census, 1880,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MW3 CST : 26 August 2017), Arthur Brown in household of Henry Brown, Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan, United States; citing enumeration district ED 237, sheet 276B, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), FHL microfilm 1,254,609.
  • 1900 Census, 1900 Census – Arthur D Brown – Twnp 136, Crow Wing, Minnesota. Family Search.
  • 1910 Census, 1910 – Arthur D Brown – Merkel, Kidder, North Dakota. “United States Census, 1910,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MLGT-WDB : accessed 10 March 2019), Arthur D Brown, Merkel, Kidder, North Dakota, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) ED 225, sheet 4A, family 67, NARA microfilm publication T624 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1982), roll 1142; FHL microfilm 1,375,155.
  • 1920 Census, 1920 Census – Arthur Brown – Sylvan Township 133, Range 30, Cass County, Minnesota. “United States Census, 1920,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4MW-7MK : accessed 24 September 2020), Arthur Brown, Sylvan, Cass, Minnesota, United States; citing ED 109, sheet 4B, line 67, family 71, NARA microfilm publication T625 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1992), roll 824; FHL microfilm 1,820,824.
  • Find a Grave, Internet, Arthur Durwood Brown (1868-1928) – Memorial 87334615. Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 24 September 2020), memorial page for Arthur Durwood Brown (1868–27 Aug 1928), Find a Grave Memorial no. 87334615, citing Gull River Cemetery, Cass County, Minnesota, USA ; Maintained by Don Taylor (contributor 47627546).

 Endnotes:

[i] The 1870 Census did not provide relationship information.

[ii] Subsequent Research had indicated that the child was Martin. Born in 1900 and died before June 1, 1900.

[iii] There was one—Dorothy was born sometime between 1905 and 1907 and died in 1908.