Halifax County, NC, Vincent and Vinson in the 1790 Census

Census Sunday
Howell-Vincent/Vinson
By Don Taylor

The 1790 Census drives home the notion that Vinson and Vincent seem to be interchangeable in this family line. The Philip Vinson of the 1800 Census is clearly Philip Vincent in the 1790 Census. His family unit consists is identified as 1 3 4 0 2  10.  That is 1 male over 16, 3 males under 16, and 4 females. All three males between 10 and 26 during the 1800 Census are represented in the males under 16 in the 1790 Census. Likewise, all the females listed in the 1800 census are represented in the 1790 Census.

Philip Vincent            1 3 4 – 2 10    (Left Column – 11th entry down)

So, from the two censuses I believe:

  • Philip Vinson/Vincent was born before 1755. (He was over 45 during the 1800 Census)
  • The suspected wife of Philip was also born before 1755. (She was also over 45 during the 1800 Census.)
  • They appear to have had six children, three boys and three girls.
  • 1 boy born 1790 to 1800
  • 1 boy born 1784 to 1790
  • 2 boys born 1774 to 1787 – One appears to be Burkett (born between 1775 and 1780)
  • 3 girls born 1784 to 1790 – No names.

The 1790 Census also includes five households with the surname Vinson. Willis is clearly the same as Willys in the 1800 Census.

  • Willis Vinson –         1 1 4 – – 6       (right column – 15th from bottom)
  • John Vinson –           1 1 1 – – 3       (left column – 3rd from bottom)
  • Benjamin Vinson – 1 2 2 – – 5       (right column – 2nd from top)
  • Charles Vinson –     1 3 2 – – 6       (right column – 10th from bottom)
  • Hanna Vinson –       0 0 4 – – 4       (right column 14th from bottom)

Note: The numbers above represent Free White Males 16 and up, Free White Males under 16, Free White Females, all other persons, slaves, and a total number of people.

If Burkett was born between 1775 and 1780, I would expect him to be reflected in this census as a Free White Male under 16 years of age. All of the households have male members that fit that criteria except for Hanna Vinson.

Based upon the 1800 Census[i], I had tentatively considered Philip to be Burkett’s father. There is nothing in the 1790 Census that would dissuade me from that hypothesis.

If you have evidence that Burkett’s father is not Philip, I would love to hear from you and learn what you have.

ENDNOTES

[i] Internet: Don Taylor Genealogy – Article “Burkett Vincent in the 1800 Census” posted 25 April 2019. http://dontaylorgenealogy.com/2019/04/burkett-vincent-in-the-1800-census.html/

Burkett Vincent in the 1800 Census

Howell-Vinson/Vincent
Census Sunday

In my research for my wife’s 3rd great-grandfather, Burkett Vincent, I was looking to find his parent’s names. I wondered if the Census records might shed some light on that inquiry.

I knew that Burkett was born in Halifax County, North Carolina from other records. I have also followed Burkett Vincent through the censuses from 1810 thru 1840. The 1810 Census indicated he was between 26 and 45, suggesting a birth year from 1765 to 1784. Likewise, the 1820 Census indicated that he was still in the 26 to 45 age group, suggesting a birth year of 1775 thru 1794. Comparing the two censuses, Burkett should have been born between 1775 and 1784. Add in the 1830 and 1840 Censuses which both indicate his birth was between 1770 and 1780, and we get the census indicated his birth as being between 1775 and 1780.

Additionally, the 1810 Census suggested a family consisting of Burkett (age 26-45), a wife (age 26-45) and one child under the age of 10. That suggests to me that in 1800, he was probably not married and probably living in the household of another, probably his parents.

Next, was to take a look at the 1800 Census for Halifax County. I confirmed that Halifax County existed in 1800 and did a search for anyone with the surname of Vincent in Halifax County. There was one – MacAlester Vincent. He was over 45 and, from all appearances, his family appeared to consist of himself, an apparent wife (over 45 years old) and two children – a girl under 10 years of age and a male, from 10 to 16 years old.  In 1800, Burkett should have been between 20 and 25 years old. So, I’m not seeing him in the MacAlester Vincent household.

I’ve encountered that the surnames Vincent and Vinson seem to swap about in the family tree, So, I searched for anyone with the surname of Vinson in Halifax County during the 1800 Census. There were three results:  Willys Vinson, Philip Vinson, and Lucian Vinson.

Vincent and Vinson’s in the 1800 Census, Halifax County, North Carolina

  MacAlester Willys Males Philip Males Lucian Males
Under 10 0 1 1 1
10 to 16 1 0 1 0
16 to 26

0

0

2

0

26 to 45 0 1 0 0
45 & Over 1 0 1 0

The Willys household consisted of only one male child and that child was under 10 years old.

Likewise “Lucian’s” household consisted of only one male child and that child was under 10 years old. Clearly, neither of these households appeared to have Burkett in them. As a side note, “Lucian’s” household had no adult males. As such, I believe the 25 to 45-year-old woman in the household was the head. Looking closely at the name in the Census record, it does not appear to be “Lucian’ to me. I’m not sure what the name is, but I don’t think it is Lucian. See image below:

1800 Census – showing “Lucian” Vincent’s name.

That left the household led by Philip Vinson. That household included one male under 10, one male from 10 to 16, two males from 16 to 26, and one male over 45 years old. That is the only Vinson/Vincent household in Halifax County that contained a male from 20 to 25 years of age. It seems to be a household which might contain the 20 to 25-year-old Burkett. If it is, then head of the household, Philip, is Burkett’s likely father.

Not Willis

I’ve seen where other researchers have indicated that Burkett’s father is Willis. If Burkett was born between 1775 and 1780 he should be represented in the 1800 Census as being between 16 and 26. Willis’ household does not have such a child in 1800.

Not McAllister

I’ve also seen where other researchers indicate that Burkett’s father is MacAlester (McAllister Vincent). Again, if Burkett was born between 1775 and 1780, he should be represented in the 1800 Census as being in the MacAlester Vincent household as between 16 and 26. There is no such child in the household during the 1800 Census.

Philip?

Does this prove that Philip Vinson is Burkett’s father?  Not even close. All is speculation; however, it does provide a name which I can use in future research hypothesizes. I can now ask “Is Philip Vinson Burkett’s father?” rather than wondering, “Who is Burkett’s father?”  A lot more research is needed, but it is a start.

The Scotts of St. Clair County, Illinois – 1840 Census

Census Sunday
Roberts-Scott

William Hunt Scott, my 3rd great-grandfather, was born about 1834 in St. Clair County, Illinois. I followed him back from his being the head of the household to the 1850 Census and living in the household of his father Samuel Kinkade Scott at Turkey Hill, St. Clair County.[i] The 1850 household looked like:

  • Samuel K Scott 41     Farmer – Real Estate Value 1600
  • Elizabeth Scott 30     Keeping House
  • William H Scott 16     Farming
  • Sarah Scott         14    Attending School
  • Mary Scott          11     Attending School
  • Francis P Scott  10     Attending School
  • Emily Scott          5      Attending School
  • Rachel Scott        1

This household has every appearance of being a traditional home with husband, wife, and six children. I hoped I could continue back to the 1840 Census. Would the Samuel Scott family include all the children and fit the model of a traditional family or might there be some other individuals in the household.

The 1840 Census[ii]

Samuel K Scott – St Clair, Illinois

MALES   |   FEMALES

– 1 – – – 1 |   2 – – – 1 –

MALES

  • 5-10         1      Presumed to be William Hunter (Born 1830-1835)
  • 30-40      1      Clearly the Head of Household – Samuel K Scott (Born 1800-1810)

FEMALES

  • < 5            2       Presumed to be Sarah and Mary – (Both born 1835-1840)
  • 20-30      1      Presumed to be Elizabeth (Born 1810-1820)

All entries are consistent with the 1850 Census.

Conclusion

William Hunt Scott and his two oldest sisters are clearly enumerated in the 1840 Census. William won’t be in the 1830 Census and his father, Samuel was only 21 years old in 1830, very possibly in the household of his father, John Scott. I am looking forward to researching this family line back to the revolution.


ENDNOTES

[i] 1850 Census (NARA), 1850 – Samuel K Scott. Year: 1850; Census Place: Turkey Hill, St Clair, Illinois; Roll: M432_126; Page: 359A; Image: 360. https://search.ancestry.com/collections/8054/records/16536816/.

[ii] 1840 Census (NARA), 1840 Census – Samuel Scott – St Clair, Illinois. “United States Census, 1840,” database with images, FamilySearch accessed: 15 August 2017), Samuel Scott, St Clair, Illinois, United States; citing p. 280, NARA microfilm publication M704, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 70; FHL microfilm 7,644. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHBJ-5WZ

The Longs of Martin County – Part 2 of 3 – The 1840 Census

Census Sunday
Howell-Hobbs-Long

The parents of my wife’s 2nd great-grandfather, Samuel Aquilla Long, are unknown. Some researchers indicate that his father’s name is John, however, I can find no source for that suggestion.  FamilySearch and Ancestry have no other suggestions nor hints about his family. Previously, I looked at the Longs of Martin County in the 1850 Census. In this posting, I continue my research for Samuel and his parents in the 1840 Census.

Martin County, NC

Samuel was born about 1817 in Martin County, North Carolina.  He married Martha Ann Bryan in 1844.  Because that, I suspect he was enumerated in the 1840 Census as a single 23-year-old living with his parent or parents.

1840 Census

The 1840 Census does not provide the names of individuals in a household; it only provides the name of the head of the household. The 1840 Census provides the names of four heads of households in Martin County, North Carolina; Joshua Long, Stephen Long, Gracey Long, and W. B. Long. Could any of these households include Samuel?

The Joshua Long Household[i]

 The Joshua Long 1840 Census household is clearly the same household as existed in 1850. All of the children in the 1850 Census are apparent in the 1840 Census.

  • James, & A.I. Long appear to be there as males born between 1830-1835
  • William appears to be a male born between 1825 and 1830.
  • John also appears to be enumerated as a male born between 1820 to 1825.

There is another male, unknown born between 1820 and 1825 who was not with the family during the 1850 Census. Samuel would have been 23 during the 1840 Census, so it is unlikely for him to be that unknown individual.

The Stephen Long Household[ii]

The Stephen Long Household includes 8 people, six males. Stephen is obviously one of the males, leaving five unknown males. One of them is in the 20 to 30-year-old range; Samuel would have been 23-years-old in 1840 so this is a possible match.

MALES

  • 10-15   2        Two Unknown Males born 1825-1830.
  • 15-20   1        Unknown Male born 1820-1825
  • 20-30   1        Unknown Male born 1810-1820 – (Samuel Aquilla Long?)
  • 30-40   1        Unknown Male born 1800-1810
  • 40-50   1        Apparently Stephen Long

FEMALES

  • 20-30    1   Unknown Female born 1820-1830.
  • 50-60    1   Apparently Stephen’s wife.

The ages don’t appear to be quite right for the Stephen Long household to be a traditional family. Rather, I suspect that there may be a sibling and/or a sibling’s spouse living with the household.

The Gracey Long Household[iii]

The Gracey Long household consists of Gracey and two young females. Samuel could not have been a member of that family.

The W. B. Long “Household”[iv]

The W. B. Long household only consists of the 20 to 30-year-old William[v]. Additionally, he lives next to Gracey and looks like he might be an adult child of Gracey’s.

Conclusion

If Samuel Aquilla Long was born in 1816-1817 and if he was enumerated in Martin County during the 1840 Census, then the only entry that fits him is to be in the household of Stephen Long in 1840.  As such, I will tentatively identify his father as Stephen Long.

Next, I’ll see what other records I can find in the 1840-1850 time period relating to the Longs of Martin County and see how they connect this family.



ENDNOTES

[i] “United States Census, 1840,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHYZ-B6C – 16 August 2017), Joshua Long, District 1, Martin, North Carolina, United States; citing p. 350, NARA microfilm publication M704, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 365; FHL microfilm 18,095.

[ii] “United States Census, 1840,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHYZ-BJD – 16 August 2017), Stephen Long, Williamston Township, Martin, North Carolina, United States; citing p. 362, NARA microfilm publication M704, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 365; FHL microfilm 18,095.

[iii] “United States Census, 1840,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHYZ-BJD – 16 August 2017), Stephen Long, Williamston Township, Martin, North Carolina, United States; citing p. 362, NARA microfilm publication M704, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 365; FHL microfilm 18,095.

[iv] Ibid.

[v] Although the indexer indicated the name of this individual was W. B. Long, my interpretation of the entry is that the “W” has a superscripted “m” following it, suggesting his name as William B. Long.

The Longs of Martin County – Part 1 of 3 – The 1850 Census

Howell-Hobbs-Long
Census Sunday

The parents of my wife’s 2nd great-grandfather, Samuel Aquilla Long, are unknown. Some researchers indicate that his father’s name is John. However, I can find no source for that suggestion.  FamilySearch and Ancestry have no other suggestions nor hints about his family. Without any clues to his parents, I decided to do a quick locational surname study and see what I can find.

What I think I know

Martin County, NC

Samuel was born about 1817 in Martin County, North Carolina.  He married Martha Ann Bryan in 1844 and appeared in the 1850 Census living in Martin County.  Because of that, I suspect he was enumerated in the earlier censuses 1820-1840, which only shows the name of the head of the household.

The 1850 Census, which provides the names of individuals in a household, although not relationships, is a good place to begin.

1850 Census

The Joshua Long household appears to be a traditional family, parents and six children. His is a new household to me. I do not know how they are related, so I entered them as an unrelated household with estimated birth years,

Joshua Long Household[i]

Household Role Sex Age Birthplace
Joshua Long M 59 North Carolina
Nancy Long F 50 North Carolina
John Long M 25 North Carolina
Wm Long M 24 North Carolina
James Long M 18 North Carolina
A. I. Long M 16 North Carolina
Mary I Long F 13 North Carolina
Ann P Long F 10 North Carolina

The Sam C A Long (Samuel A. Long) household appears to be a traditional family, parents and four children.  Samuel is my wife’s 2nd Great-Grandfather’s household in 1850. I confirmed all entries were in my database already. Approximate Birth Year, Birthplace, and Residence on 1 June 1850.

Samuel Long Household[ii]

Household Role Sex Age Birthplace
Sam C A Long[iii] M 33 North Carolina
Ann Long F 27
John Long M 9
Jas Long M 7
Wm Long M 5
May Long F 2

(Note: Ditto marks were not entered on this page; I assumed that the Birthplace was North Carolina for the other members of the household.)

William Long – Next Door to Samuel Long[iv]

Next door to Samuel Long is William Long. Samuel is dwelling 638 and Family 503. William is dwelling 639 and family 504.  William is 28 years old and owns the property valued at $1300. By the census, within the same family unit are three additional dwellings with the following occupants.

  • 660 Thos (Thomas) Parmer (age 65)
  • 661 George Rawls (Age 33) apparently with wife Gatsy, and 4 children.
  • 662 Elizabeth Johnson (age 60) with apparently three adult children.

Certainly, it is likely that William Long is related to Samuel Long. With Samuel being 33 and William being 28, I guess that they are probably brothers or 1st cousins.  The people in the three additional dwellings are also possibly related. But for now, I’ll enter William Long as unrelated into my system but leave a note about the other individuals in his file.

Living with Sheriff Mooring[v]

Finally, there is the household of A. S. Mooring. He is the 33-year-old Sherriff. His household, #29, consists of 14 people. Six of the people are Moorings and appear to be the Sheriff, his wife, and four children. Besides them, there are three females, Mary A C Long, A. E. Long, and Cindarilla Whitaker. Finally, there are five males in their 20s and 30s. Mary A. C. Long is 30 and A E Long is 12.

Next, I’ll look at the 1840 Census and see if I can place some of these individuals into households….



ENDNOTES

[i] “United States Census, 1850,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4B8-HFS – 12 April 2016), Household of Joshua Long, Martin county, Martin, North Carolina, United States; citing family 624, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

[ii] “United States Census, 1850,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4B8-5QZ – 12 April 2016), May Long in household of Sam C A Long, Martin county, Martin, North Carolina, United States; citing family 503, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

[iii] My reading of the census entry is that it says “Sam’l” which was indexed as “Sam C.”

[iv] “United States Census, 1850,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4B8-5QG 12 April 2016), William Long, Martin county, Martin, North Carolina, United States; citing family 504, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

[v] “United States Census, 1850,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4B8-MT212  April 2016), Mary A C Long in household of A S Mooring, Martin county, Martin, North Carolina, United States; citing family 29, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).