Mannin in Carter County – 1870 Census

Census Sunday
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.In my look at the Mannin Family of Carter County during the 1880 Census, I discovered six families and 37 individuals. Continuing, I would expect to find five families during the 1870 Census. Meredith A. Mannin would be 14-years-old and would be expected to be with his parents.

1870 Census

A search for “Mannin” in Carter County, Kentucky, yielded six families who were enumerated in the county in 1880. All six were in Precinct 4; all were in Enumeration District 15, suggesting they all lived nearby each other. They were:

Enock Mannon (Enoch Mannin in 1880 Census) – Born c. 1822.

      • Manuroa Mannon (Manerva in the 1880 Census) – Born c. 1822.
      • Meredith Mannon (Age 24 in the 1880 Census) – Born c. 1851.
      • Mary Mannon – Born c. 1854.
      • Gazzeller Mannon – Born c. 1854.
      • Prudence Mannon – Born c. 1854.

Isaac Mannin – I have not been successful in finding Isaac, Tennessee, or Samuel McKee Mannin in the 1870 Census. I would expect them to be 22, 22, and 2 years old, respectively.

Thomas Mannen – (Thomas H. Mannin in 1880 Census) – Born c. 1827.

      • Rachal 1839
      • Merideth 1854
      • Sarah 1857
      • John 1859
      • Samuel 1861
      • Mary 1863
      • Zachariah 1865

There are two (implied) older children living in the household, Merideth, and Sarah. Sarah probably married out before the 1880 Census. Merideth, in this family, could be the same Meredith I’ve previously ascribed as the son of Enoch. I will need to look at the two Meredith more carefully and figure out which Meredith married whom and had which children.

Tubil Mannan (Tubal Mannin in 1880 Census) – Born c. 1831.

      • Elizabeth Mannan – Born c. 1834, VA.
      • Mary Mannan – Born c. 1854.
      • Martha Mannan – Born c. 1856.
      • John Mannan – Born c. 1858.
      • Vanlandingham Mannan – Born c. 1862.
      • James Mannon – Born c. 1864.
      • Sarah Mannon – Born c. 1868.

Two daughters, Mary & Martha, probably “married out” between the 1870 and 1880 censuses.

Wm C Manning – (Mannin in 1880 Census) – Born ca. 1846.

      • Martha E Mannin Born c. 1850
      • Alvin Mannin Age 10/12 (Born Aug 1869)

The family was living in Pendleton County, Kentucky, which is about 30 miles south of Cincinnati and about a hundred miles west of Carter County. That means the William C. Manning family moved from west to east between 1870 and 1880.

I discovered one new individual, Merideth Mannin. Living with him was a Richardson family consisting of a husband and wife with three children and three additional teenagers. One is likely the sister of James Richardson (based on age and surname); the other two were Ruben and Evaline Tapp.

Follow-up

Look at the two Meredith Mannins in the 1870 Census more carefully and figure out which Meredith married whom and had which children.

Conclusion

The 1870 Census didn’t provide any real clarity to understanding the Mannin families of mid 19th century Carter County. It did lead to other questions about which of two Meredith Mannin’s was the one enumerated in the 1880 Census.

Sources

    • 1870 Census (NARA), 1870 – Enock Mannon – Grayson, Carter, Kentucky – Page 10. Year: 1870; Census Place: Precinct 4, Carter, Kentucky; Roll M593_454; Page: 131B; Image: 266; Family History Library Film: 545953. http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?h=17854241&db=1870usfedcen&indiv=1.
    • 1870 Census (NARA), 1870 – Thomas Mannen. “United States Census, 1870”, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MX75-MTZ : 18 March 2020), Entry for Thomas Mannen, 1870.
    • 1870 Census (NARA), 1870 – Tubil Mannan. “United States Census, 1870”, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MX75-M51 : 18 March 2020), Entry for Tubil Mannan, 1870.
    • 1870 Census (NARA), 1870 – William C Manning – Pendleton, Kentucky. “United States Census, 1870”, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MX4M-QB6 : 19 March 2020), Entry for Wm C Manning, 1870.

Mannin in Carter County – 1880 Census

Census Sunday
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.One of my truly difficult lines to follow is my 2nd great-grandmother, Elisa Jane [or Lisa J.] (Fannin) Mannin. Several other researcher’s trees suggest her maiden surname was “Mannin” and was probably a cousin of John William Mannin. I have only discovered her named in one or two documents.

In any event, I want to understand the Mannin families of Carter County, Kentucky in the mid to late 1800s. I have very little direct evidence regarding the Mannin family and how various relations exist. So, if I start with the 1880 Census, which describes relationships, I should be able to track the families back in time.

1880 Census

A search for “Mannin” in Carter County, Kentucky yielded six families who were enumerated in the county in 1880. All six were in Precinct 4 and all were in Enumeration District 15, suggesting they all lived nearby each other. They were:

Enoch Mannin – Sheet 547D – Previously incorporated in my tree.

      • Enoch, Head – Age 57.
      • Manerva, wife – Age 59.

Isaac Mannin – Sheet 547D – Apparently the 2nd head of household in the same dwelling – Previously incorporated.

      • Isaac Mannin,                    Head – Age 32
      • Tenisee Mannin,               Wife – Age 32
      • Sam Mc Kee Mannin        Son – Age 12
      • Henry M Mannin               Son – Age 9
      • Frances P Mannin             Son – Age 7
      • James H Mannin                Son – Age 5
      • Phodeena Mannin             Daughter – Age 0

Merideth A. Mannin – Sheet 546B – Previously incorporated.

      • Merideth A Mannin Head – Age 24
      • Sousan F Mannin      Wife – Age 25
      • Rachal E Mannin       Daughter – Age 3
      • Sarah M Mannin        Daughter – Age 1

Thomas H. Mannin – Sheet 546A – Previously incorporated.

      • Thos H Mannin            Head – Age 52
      • Rachal Mannin             Wife – Age 42
      • John J Mannin               Son – Age 21
      • Samuel T Mannin        Son – Age 19
      • Mary D Mannin            Daughter – Age 17
      • Zachariah W Mannin Son – Age 15
      • Eliza F Mannin             Daughter – Age 5

Tubal Mannin – Sheet 539D – Previously incorporated.

      • Tubal Mannin                Head – Age 50[i]
      • Elizabeth J Mannin       Wife – Age 44 (Born Virginia)
      • John L Mannin                Son – Age 22
      • Valandinghan Mannin Son – Age 16
      • James S Mannin             Son – Age 14
      • Sarah C Mannin             Daughter – Age 10
      • Amanda L Mannin        Daughter – Age 7
      • Willie Mannin                Son – Age 1
      • Killie Mannin                Daughter – Age 1

William C Mannin – Sheet 546A – New Family for me.  I entered Names, relationships, year and place of birth and residence during the 1880 Census based upon this record.

      • Wm C Mannin            Head – Age 34
      • Martha E Mannin     Wife – Age 30
      • Alvin Mannin              Son – Age 10
      • Montaville Mannin  Son – Age 9
      • Silas Mannin               Son – Age 8
      • Arminta Mannin       Daughter – Age 5
      • Asbury Mannin          Son – Age 2
      • William C Mannin    Son – Age 0

All of the individuals were born in Kentucky except for Tubal’s wife, Elizabeth [Mannin].

Conclusion

Six families and 37 individuals with the Mannin surname lived, according to the 1880 Census, in Carter County in 1880. Note: John William Mannin(g) and his wife, Lisa, appear to be living in adjoining Rowan County, Kentucky during the 1880 Census.

Sources

  • 1880 Census, 1880 – Enoch Mannin – Precinct 4, Carter, Kentucky – ED 15, Page 20 (FS). Year: 1880; Census Place: Precinct 4, Carter, Kentucky; Roll T9_408; Family History Film: 1254408; Page: 547.4000; Enumeration District: 15; Image: 0374.
  • 1880 Census, 1880 – Isaac Wilson Mannin – Precinct 4, Carter, Kentucky; Roll: 408; Family. “United States Census, 1880,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCCH-V4Y : 29 August 2017), Phodeena Mannin in household of Isaac Mannin, Precinct 4, Carter, Kentucky, United States; citing enumeration district ED 15, sheet 547D, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), FHL microfilm 1,254,408.
  • 1880 Census, 1880 – Merideth A. Mannin -. “United States Census, 1880,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCCH-NXL : 29 August 2017), Sarah M Mannin in household of Merideth A Mannin, Precinct 4, Carter, Kentucky, United States; citing enumeration district ED 15, sheet 546B, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), FHL microfilm 1,254,408.
  • 1880 Census, 1880 – Thomas H Mannin – Precinct No. 4 – Carter, Kentucky. “United States Census, 1880,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCCH-N6P : 29 August 2017), Eliza F Mannin in household of Thos H Mannin, Precinct 4, Carter, Kentucky, United States; citing enumeration district ED 15, sheet 546A, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), FHL microfilm 1,254,408.
  • 1880 Census, 1880 – Tubal Mannin, Precinct 4, Carter, Kentucky. “United States Census, 1880,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCCH-FZ8 : 29 August 2017), Killie Mannin in household of Tubal Mannin, Precinct 4, Carter, Kentucky, United States; citing enumeration district ED 15, sheet 539D, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), FHL microfilm 1,254,408.
  • 1880 Census, 1880 – William C. Mannin. “United States Census, 1880,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCCH-FCB : 29 August 2017), William C Mannin in household of Wm C Mannin, Precinct 4, Carter, Kentucky, United States; citing enumeration district ED 15, sheet 546A, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), FHL microfilm 1,254,408.”United States Census, 1880,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCCH-FCB : 29 August 2017), William C Mannin in household of Wm C Mannin, Precinct 4, Carter, Kentucky, United States; citing enumeration district ED 15, sheet 546A, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), FHL microfilm 1,254,408.

Endnotes

[i]  Other records suggest Tubal was born in Missouri.

 

Lisa J Fannin and the Ancestry Trees.

Brown-Manning-Fannin
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.I’ve never been entirely comfortable with my entries for family relationships for my Great-grandmother, Mary Elizabeth Manning. I know my tree in that area goes back 30 years ago or more and was based upon other people’s trees. I know that her sister was Phoebe Jane Manning. It appears that her father was John William Manning and her mother was Lisa (possibly Elisa) Jane Fannin. The problem is that I don’t have sources for those relationships. I also believe that she had a half-brother, Robert J. Manning. Again, I don’t have much in the way of sources for that information.  So, I thought I look at other people’s trees on Ancestry and see what they have for sources.  There were two women that appeared to be my ancestor:

  1. Elisa J Fannin (1861-1880), married to John Mannen (1841-1919). The only source used in any of five trees that relate to her only cite other trees. Additionally, this John Mannen died in 1919, which would be inconsistent with other aspects of my Lisa Fannin’s husband.
  2. Lisa J. Mannin (1861-1880), married to John William “Joe” Mannin. This John Mannin appears to be correct, however, I’m not convinced this is the correct individual either, but more about that after I’ve analyzed the documents. Ancestry indicates there are 58 trees associated with Lisa J. Mannin.

The majority of trees that Ancestry associates associated with Lisa J. Mannin only have other trees as their sources, however, the first tree has 2 sources associated with it. So, I’ll take a look at those first.

1880 Census – I had already found John and Lisa in the 1880 Census. Nothing new there.

1870 Census – George M. Mannin household consisting of an implied wife and four children. Lisa’s name in this census is Louisa J. Mannin. The age is correct (9) but the name is different, and the location is questionable. This Census location is Greenup County. John lived in Bath County before the Civil War and He and Lisa lived in Rowan county in 1880. The logistics of a young girl marrying an older man from two counties away seems difficult for me to reconcile.

So, absent any compelling connections, I will not ascribe Louisa to my Lisa; however, I will add tracing the George M. Mannin household to future tasks.

Kentucky Marriage Records – The next source shows the marriage between John W. Mannin to Sarah J Garvin. The couple took out a license on July 29, 1868 and married the following day in Carter County by a Judge of CC. The individual whose tree provided this source is incorrect in ascribing it to John and Elisa’s marriage. However, it might provide insight into who might have been John’s son’s mother. I tentatively added this record as a “first marriage for John W. Mannin.” There is nothing compelling that this John W. Mannin is my (2nd Great-Grandfather) John Mannin other than name and location. I need to find other evidence to collaborate this is my John W. Mannin.

1860 Census – Simon Manning household consisting of an implied wife and one child, a girl Eliza Manning. Lisa was 19 in the 1880 Census, so it appears unlikely this two-year-old is the same person. I might add a note to Lisa’s profile: Do not confuse with Eliza Manning, born 1857-1858 Implied daughter of Simon and Polloy Manning.

There are 14 private trees identified on Ancestry which appear to have Lisa J. Mannin. All of them either have no records or only 1 record associated to Lisa. As such, I suspect they are all citing Ancestry Trees.

Conclusion

Other people didn’t have sources any better than mine. So, I should probably explore surname studies or other research avenues.

Future Actions

Trace the George M. Mannin household through other censuses.

The George M. Mannin household in 1870[i] consisted of:

      • George Mannin           49
      • Elizabeth Mannin        33
      • Martha A                     12
      • John B                         10
      • Louisa J                         9
      • James D                        8

Follow John W. Mannin and his wife Sarah Gavin in other records.


ENDNOTES

[i] Year: 1870; Census Place: Precinct 3, Greenup, Kentucky; Roll: M593_466; Page: 67A; Family History Library Film: 545965

 

Cross-Country Travels

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun
My Life
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.The Weekly Genealogist, produced by NEHGS, regularly has a survey question designed to make you think about your ancestors’ lives. They recently had a question asking if you or your ancestors traveled “across the country” not by airplane. In this case, “across the country” was a trip of more than 1500 miles.

Randy Seaver, in his blog, Genea-Musing, suggested taking that idea, cross country trips, and write about it.[i] I thought about the question and realized that with Detroit to Portland, Oregon, is over 2300 miles, my grandmother, mother, and I have all have had such travels, several times.

My Cross-Country Trips

I’ve made trips across the country several times.

1964 Ford Falcon Estate pic2
1964 Ford Falcon like I traveled in in 1969.
When I was in the service, (Christmas 1969) three of us drove a Ford Falcon station wagon from San Francisco to Minneapolis. One person drove, one sat in the passenger seat, and one person slept in the back. Each person would rotate positions every three hours. We only stopped for gas and made the 2000 mile trip in less than 34 hours.

My second cross country trip was when I left Oregon to go to training in Vallejo, California, in 1972. After training, we knew I was heading to a ship at sea, so my wife and son moved from Oregon to Minneapolis. I drove Mary (my first wife), and our son Matt, the 1600 miles back to Minnesota, where they lived during my time at school. I flew from Minneapolis to San Francisco to training and again to the Philippines for my first cruise aboard the USS Kitty Hawk.

The next cross-country trip was when I moved Mary-Alice from her home in Maine to Minneapolis. Just a little over 1500 miles, it only barely qualified for this list. That trip was in her Dodge Caravan, loaded to the top with stuff. We arrived in Minneapolis just after the “Great Halloween Blizzard of 1991.” Before I had told Mary-Alice that Minnesota was colder than Maine, but we didn’t get as much snow. When we got to Minnesota, Interstate 94 was two ruts heading up out of the Saint Croix river valley because of the 28 inches of snow the Twin Cities had received. She gave me that look, that said, “We never had this much snow in Maine in October.”

The Mojave Desert in Bloom – Photo by Geoff Stocker.

In 1998, Mary-Alice and I moved to Long Beach, California (about 1900 miles). I drove the car and Mary-Alice drove her van. We kept in contact with little radios. When we got to the Mohave Desert, she kept asking where the desert was. We drove through it during a “once-in-a-century” flower bloom. It was gorgeous, entire hillsides yellow with flowers.

In 2000, Mary-Alice and I moved from Long Beach to Boston, Massachusetts. Our van was over-loaded with stuff and relatively old, so I was afraid to try the shorter 3000-mile northern route because of the mountains on the way. So, we took the 3200 mile-route through Phoenix, El Paso, and Dallas. That was a brutal trip. We stopped at a weird motel in Tennessee and had a difficult time finding our room. Little did we know that the 200 rooms were downstairs from the 100 rooms.

I made the trip between Minneapolis and Portland, Oregon, as an infant, twice with my mother. I don’t remember either trip and rely only upon my mother’s telling of the stories.

My Mother’s Cross-Country Trips.

Back in 1950, my mother got a job with an outfit that sold magazines door to door. They had a crew of kids, my mother was 18, and moved city to city. I know they started in Detroit and ended in Portland, Oregon, in just a few months, stopping at cities and towns all along the way. I still wasn’t born yet but was born a few weeks after her arrival in Portland.

In 1953, my mother was pregnant with my sister, Glennis. Mom like the hospital I was born in and decided she wanted her second child to be born in the same hospital. She hitch-hiked from Minneapolis to Portland, Oregon (1700 miles) with 3-year-old me. Wow—What a trip that must have been for her.

My mom and Budgar traveled between Minneapolis and Phoenix (over 1600 miles) many times.

On one occasion she traveled between Phoenix and Minneapolis by herself and then continued with me to Clarksburg, West Virginia (about 2600 miles in total).

My Grandmother, Donna

My Grandmother was a fantastic traveler. She was born in Albion, Michigan and lived there until about 1914 when she went to California to be one of Max Sennett’s Bathing Beauties and to be in the movie, “Birth of a Nation.”

She traveled from California to Massachusetts in 1915 and lived in the Boston area for a few years.

In 1919, Donna traveled from New York to Decatur, Illinois to join the cast of “Chin Chin.” She then toured with the show to Nebraska, Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Idaho, Oregon, British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Indiana, Michigan, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Maryland, Vermont, Connecticut, and Massachusetts before the show ended.

Known locations Donna was at during the “Chin Chin” Tour.

In 1922 & 1923, “Donna Darling and Company” went on the road. They started in New York and went to Pennsylvania, Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Wisconsin, North Carolina, South Carolina, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Arkansas.

In 1924, Donna went on another tour heading west from New York to include Montana, Oregon, and California with stops all over in between.

In 1926, Donna had another tour heading west from New York and including Texas, Arizona, California, Oregon, Washington, Montana, Wisconsin, Michigan.

In 1927, Donna had another tour heading south from New York and across to New Orleans and back.

During her travels, virtually all of the trips were via train. A typical day, she’d board the first train out of a city, take the train with her crew, cast, and sets to another town, typically 2 to 4 hours away. The crew would unload and install the sets at the theater. She would then do a show or two that day. After the show, they’d head to a hotel for the night then head out again with the first train to another town. Sometimes, on longer travels, I’m sure they’d sleep on the train while heading to the next city. She had a train stuck in the snow in Nebraska for several days, a trestle washed out in Arizona (where they needed to carry their scenery past the wash-out on their backs), and had an earthquake break the tracks in California.

As I get more and more of her vaudeville career documented, I’ll create maps showing her travels and some of her many travel challenges.

Others

Oxen Team pulling covered wagon – Photo by Don Harrison (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

I don’t know anything about my biological father’s life travels, nor do I know about his parents’ travels. I know that grandpa Dick was in the service and probably traveled cross country with that. He served in Panama, so I’m sure he at least traveled from Minnesota to the Gulf (or a coast) as a minimum. My great-grandmother Mary (Manning) Brown never traveled 1500 miles (to my knowledge), but she did travel the 1000 miles, from Kentucky to Minnesota, by oxen-driven wagon. That trip was with her grandparents, Enoch & Minerva (Toliver) Mannin.  I think a 1000 miles trip by oxen-driven wagon is much tougher than twice that distance by train or automobile, so it should count.

ENDNOTES

[i] Internet: Genea-Musings by Randy Seaver – 27 July 2019 – “Saturday Night Genealogy Fun – Ancestors Trans-Continental Travel (not by Airplane)

 

Cleanup Week – Mary Elizabeth (Mannin/Manning) Brown

This week was a clean-up week. I updated and corrected the sources I had supporting facts in the life of Mary Elizabeth (Manning) Brown (1878-1983).  “Grandma Brown” was the oldest ancestor that I recall ever meeting. She was born 72 years before I was born and was well into her 80s when I remember first seeing her. She is also my oldest known ancestor, having lived to be 105 years old.

Besides updating her sketch on my website, I updated and added many sources about her life facts to her entry on Family Search. I also added a couple of photos and a few documents, and a story I recalled about her. https://www.familysearch.org/tree/person/details/L81G-LLQ

If you have photos of Mary Brown you can share, I’d love to see them. Please send to me or share them on Family Search.