Letter of Elizabeth Jane (Swayze) Darling – Kalamazoo First Methodist Church

Darling
Transcribed by Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.Another article discovered on Genealogy Bank
that provides insight into the lives of the Darling family of Kalamazoo during the mid-1800s. The Darling’s and the Swayze’s were involved with the First Methodist Church of Kalamazoo.

Kalamazoo Gazette (Kalamazoo, MI) – August 14, 1916, Page 6

Pioneer’s Letter Tells History of Kalamazoo first Methodist Church

MISS EMMA DARLING FINDS
EPISTLE PENNED BY HER MOTHER YEARS AGO.

Kalamazoo Gazette 14 August 1916, Page 6.

In looking through some treasures in her desk the other day Miss Emma Darling*[1] came across, a paper in the handwriting of her mother, who had jotted down a few incidents in the history of the First Methodist church that are of moment and are certainly not known by many today though familiar facts In pioneer days.

Miss Darling’s parents and grandparents were pioneers and did much to make history for this section of Michigan. And today Miis Darling resides on a portion of the land purchased by her father Rufus H. Darling*[2] when he came to Michigan in (hose days when hardships were aplenty and luxuries a. thing unknown.

Of the Methodist church Mrs. Darling*[3] writes:

“My father’s family came here in the spring of 1840 and united with this church by letter. This Methodist people were then holding- service in a little old schoolhouse on ‘ South Rose street where the Jewish synagogue now stands. Mr., Richards came here as pastor the next, fail after we did and.the church then began plans for building a church.

Gen’l Burdick Gives Lot

“Their means were limited for their number was small and they met with many discouragements. The sister churches thought we never could build and pay for as large a church as we planned to have. But these things only made us more persevering.

General Burdick gave the church the lot where the Dutch Reformed church now stands and, Mr. Wiseman*[4] drew the plan for the church hut he died before the church was completed. But he made a request that they would use hie Bible at the dedication.

“Mr. Richards stayed hero two years in all and Rev. Range followed and the church was completed during this time, for the church was dedicated in the year 1842. If was not entirely free from debt until 1850.

“Mr. Watson preached the sermon at the dedication.’ There was only one class at this time, led by my father, David Swayze*[5], and father and sister, Emily*[6] led the singing.”

The late. George Torrey in his history of Kalamazoo says in regard to the Methodist church: “The first sermon preached in the town, was by Rev. James Robe, who was appointed to the Kalamazoo mission by the Indiana Conference, in “1822; and who is, now, a resident of the place. (This history was published to 1867).

Service in Titus Bronson home

The service was held in the house of Mr. Titus Bronson after whom tho place was named. The first-class was organized in the Year 1832 and was composed of eight members of whom Harrison Coleman was leader.

“The first board of trustees was organized at the house of Mr. C. Walters, on February 8th, 1841, and consisted of, David Swayze, C. Walters, Luke Olmsted. Isaac Tewkesbury, Amos P, Bush, Isaac Wiseman, William E. White, and David J. Davidson.

The 1842 Methodist Church on Academy St. – Photo Courtesy of the Kalamazoo Public Library

“The first church edifice was dedicated in 1842 on the church square, Church and Academy streets, and was occupied until the spring of 1866 when it was sold to the Dutch Reformed church.

“The society are now erecting what is intended to be one of the largest and most costly churches In the state, which will be completed during the year. They have flourishing Sunday school of about 250 scholars under the superintendency of Mr. Geo. H. Lyman, and a membership of nearly three hundred communicants, under the pastoral, care of Rev. Charles Shelling. The Kalamazoo District is In charge of Rev. R. Sapp, presiding elder.”

Facts:

  • The [Swayze] family came to Kalamazoo in the spring of 1840.
  • David Swayze led a class at the church (ca. 1842)
  • David Swayze and Emily [Emily Ann Swayze] lead the singing at the church (ca. 1842).
  • David Swayze was a member of the first board of trustees for the First Methodist Church in Kalamazoo in 1841.
  • Isaac Wiseman was a member of the first board of trustees for the First Methodist Church in Kalamazoo in 1841.

Sources:

  • Image: The Methodists’ 1842 building on Academy. Map of Kalamazoo, Michigan. H MAP 912.77417 M6475 1858 | Source: “First Methodist Church — Kalamazoo Public Library”. 2019. Kalamazoo Public Library. Accessed December 19 2019. https://www.kpl.gov/local-history/kalamazoo-history/religion/first-methodist-church/.

*Endnotes – Relationships

[1] Emma Darling, my wife’s 2nd great aunt.
[2[ Rufus H. Darling, my wife’s 2nd great grandfather.
[3] “Mrs. Darling” refers to Emma’s mother, Elizabeth Jane (Swayze) Darling, my wife’s 2nd great grandmother.
[4] Mr. Wiseman refers to Elizabeth Jane (Swayze’s) first husband, Isaac Wiseman.
[5] David Swayze was my wife’s 3rd great grandfather.
[6] Emily Ann Swayze, my wife’s 3rd great aunt.

 

Step 2a – Newspapers – My Favorites

Using “Step 2a” to Research Rufus Harry Darling.

After I had done my initial research on a person, (Birth, Marriage, Death, Censuses, and “happen upons,” during the individual’s life, I begin my Phase 2 research. In the case of my wife’s great-grandfather, Rufus Harry Darling, I found many key points in his life. His life was complicated. He appears to have lived in Kalamazoo until he was about 30. Then as a “railroad man,” he lived in many locations, Chicago, Kansas City, and Texas. He may or may not have lived in Buena Vista, Colorado or Kittanning, Pennsylvania, where he married his first and second wives.

Where Rufus Harry Darling lived during known events in his life.

  • 1857 (Born), 1860, 1863, 1864, 1870, 1877, 1895 1911, 1917 (Death) – Kalamazoo, Michigan
  • 1876    Kalamazoo, Michigan – 12 Cedar
  • 1880    Kalamazoo, Michigan – 42 Rose
  • 1887    Kalamazoo, Michigan – 209 Edwards
  • 1889, 1907      Chicago, Illinois
  • 1890    Buena Vista, Colorado
  • 1891, 1896, 1900, 1910 – Kansas City, Missouri
  • 1894    Texas
  • 1907    Kittanning, Pennsylvania

I consider it possible that a person could have located to a new location the day after the previous event and the day before the next event in their life. With day in mind, I develop a search plan.

I also look for the first name, first name with middle initial, first name with middle name, and first and last initial in the newspapers. Also, when I know a person’s address, I search for the address also. Finally, I also search the name in a last name first format. So, in the case of Rufus I have the following searches to do.

  • Rufus Harry Darling
  • Rufus H Darling
  • Rufus Darling
  • Darling, Rufus
  • Darling, Rufus H (unnecessary if no “Darling, Rufus” results are found.
  • Darling, Rufus Harry (unnecessary if no “Darling, Rufus H” results are found.
  • 12 Cedar
  • 42 Rose
  • 209 Edwards

All during the appropriate years and locations.

The Dates and Locations are:

  • Buena Vista, Colorado 1889-1891
  • Chicago 1887-1910
  • Kalamazoo – 1857 to 1907 – It is possible that Rufus was in Kalamazoo anytime from his birth to his death.
    • Kalamazoo at 12 Cedar 1857 to 1880
    • Kalamazoo at 42 Rose 1876-1887
    • Kalamazoo at 209 Edwards 1880-1889
  • Kansas City – 1890-1911
  • Kittanning, PA – 1906-1908
  • Texas – 1891-1895

For this search I have three source search categories.

A.  My favorite sites.
B.  Location sites.
C.  Sites of Sites.

My Favorite Paid Sites

 My Favorite Free Sites

In my browser, I have all of the above entries in a single folder of Genealogy/Newspaper bookmarks. I hover “Newspaper” right click then open all and all 12 of the sites are opened. I then work through each of the web sites for my search criteria.

Discovery – Marriage Clarification

For some time, I’ve had two marriage dates for Rufus and his first wife, Ida.

  1. June 1889 – When Rufus married Anna (Hannah) McAllister he indicated that he had been married previously, in June 1889 and that his first wife died in September 1898.
  2. September 1890 – Rufus H. Darling married Ida Ready in Buena Vista, Colorado.

The Michigan State Census of 1894 shows the Elizabeth Darling household included two of her daughters, Mary and Emma, her son, Rufus H, and her daughter-in-law Ida. That census is what told me that Rufus’ wife’s name was Ida. So, when I found a Rufus H. Darling marrying an Ida Ready, I ascribed that to my Rufus. I hypnotized that the June 1889 marriage was a mistake of some sort, either by the clerk or, possibly, Rufus said the name he began living with Ida and not the date of their actual marriage.

I always had a bad feeling about that marriage location and date. Nothing in my research, other than Rufus H. Darling marrying Ida Ready, suggests that Rufus was ever in Colorado.

That was before I found an interesting article during this search. On page 5 of the September 27, 1889 Kalamazoo Gazette[iii], it said:

Kalamazoo Gazette – 27 September 1889, page 5, via Genealogy Bank.

“The Chicago Herald of a recent date states that the police of that city are looking for Mrs. Rufus Darling, a runaway wife. It is claimed that she left her husband at St. Louis to come to this city, but nothing has been heard from her since her departure. Darling is having great times with his wife and other women since he left here.”

That Mrs. Rufus Darling appeared to be a “runaway wife” and learning that Rufus had “great times” with other women since he left Kalamazoo seems to fit with his personality.

The article confirms that Rufus was married in 1889, So I now believe that it was a different Rufus H Darling who married a different Ida in 1890.

UPDATE: Marriage: June 1889 Rufus Darling to Ida LNU.

Marriage: September 1890 was removed and added as a note of unlikely possibility to the June 1889 marriage notes.

Discovery 2 – A “Happen Upon”

During my search for Rufus on Hathi Trust, I happened upon a Report of Accidents for Michigan during the year 1887. Under “Injured” I found an entry which read:

“March 5. Rufus Darling, brakeman, Northville, fell from engine, shoulder blade broken.”

Commissioner of Railroads Report – 1888, Page 380 via Hathi Trust.

We know that Rufus was a “railroad man.” Also, search for Darlings in Northville, Michigan failed to yield any Darlings living in the township.,” As such, I’m pretty sure the “Northville” reference is to where the accident occurred. Even though the railroad was the Flint & Pere Marquette Railroad Co., I suspect that this was our Rufus. Today, Northville is a suburb of Metropolitan Detroit.

Also, such an injury might have been the prelude to Rufus becoming a clerk for the Midwest Central Railroad shortly after that. I added a new “tentative” event:

NEW Event: 5 Mar 1887 – Rufus Darling, a brakeman, fell from an engine and broke his shoulder blade.

Conclusion

It is always a good genealogy session when I can clarify a fact, learn a new fact, and can add a specific search for further research.

Future Actions

Specifically search the Chicago Herald in September 1889 for mentions of Rufus and his runaway wife.

Continue my newspaper searches using “state newspaper sites.” (Step 2B)

Using the “Sites of Sites” to determine if I’ve missed any appropriate newspapers that should be searched. (Step 2C)


Endnotes

[i] I generally have a subscription to two Newspaper subscription services at a time and rotate between several newspaper services.  Currently, I have Genealogy Bank and Newspapers.Com subscriptions.

[ii] Chronicling America is searched when you do an Elephind search. I often skip using Chronicling America and only search Elephind, particularly if there are few hits for newspaper articles.

[iii] This article was repeated on page 3 of the October 4, 1889 Kalamazoo Gazette. See Genealogy Bank.

Rufus Darling and the First Train in Kalamazoo

Darling
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.Finding stories about the lives of our ancestors is always a joy. In this story, my wife’s 2nd great aunt, Emma Darling, relates the story of the arrival of the first train to Kalamazoo.  The sound of the shrill whistle, certainly heard for the first time by many of the townspeople, created excitement that emptied the churches on a Sunday. Besides that story, more information about my wife’s 2nd great grandfather, Rufus Holton Darling and there is even a brief mention of my wife’s 3rd great grandfather, David Swayze.


Kalamazoo Gazette (Kalamazoo, MI) 9 July 1916, Page 6

Transcription by Don Taylor

Miss Emma Darling has invitation sent her father for Railroad banquet in 1846 

“On the Southeast corner of Main and Burdick streets was the old and well-known dry good stand of Goss and Darling (with the Gazette office upstair)” so says the late George Torrey in his history of Kalamazoo. Continuing Mr. Torrey states “next was the dry goods store of Clark and Kendal, (Foster and Underwood, tailors upstairs; father down was Farrell’s shoe store; then came Benj. M Austin’s jewelry shop; next to the Wolverine exchange kept by the indomitable Col. Hosea B. Huston with Patrick’s restaurant underneath it; next east was the “New York store,” kept by Camp and Company I think.” 

All this was in September 1844 when the Michigan Telegraph, edited and published by Henry B. Miller made its first appearance. These were early days in the history of Kalamazoo and it is only a few who now remember that the first store built in Kalamazoo was that of Goss and Darling on Main and Burdick street, built by Rufus H. Darling and David Swayze. This corner was at that time only a wooded spot.

Within a short time, this corner will meet another change when the present brick buildings will be razed that a handsome new building may be erected for the First National bank.

Miss Emma Darling, who still resides on a portion of the land purchased by her father, Rufus H. Darling, at Cedar and Rose streets has many interesting souvenirs of the early days of Kalamazoo.

Has Railroad Contract.

“My father,” said Miss Darling, “had the contract for building the Michigan Central railway from Michigan City through to Grass Lake and on its completion a banquet was given for which I have the original invitations sent to my parents. I had it framed that it might not be destroyed and it reads thus:

Kalamazoo. February 5, 1846

Sir

The Central Rail Road having been completed to Kalamazoo, and our citizens being desirous to furnish to its friends a supper. You are respectfully invited at the Kalamazoo House, on Wednesday Evening, Feb 11th.

Committee of Arrangements

      • A. Edwards             M Binsddill
      • Anthony Cooley    S. Trowbridge
      • D. S. Walbridge     Milo J. Goss
      • S. B. Davis               J Burdick
      • I. Moffatt, Jr.         Chas. E. Stuart
      • D. B. Webster         R. S. Gage

“Nearly everyone has heard the story of the arrival of the first train in Kalamazoo on a Sunday,” said Miss Darling “and of how everyone on the toot of the whistle jumped from their seat at church service and went to investigate the noise.”

First Train Arrived.

In connection it might be well to quote from the diary of Alex. J. Sheldon, many of his notes being included in the Torrey History:

Tne “St. Joseph” — First Train to travel from Detroit to Kalamazoo.

Monday, February 2, 1846 — A most lovely day. This morning the cars, which came in on Sunday (yesterday) commenced their regular trips. I forgot to mention that a car was run upon the wood to this place last Sunday week. At about half-past two o’clock p. m. on that day, just after divine service had commenced in the churches, the shrill, loud and prolonged shriek of the coming locomotive startled the congregation, producing a sensation of the liveliest character. The sanctity of the day and the place, the eloquence of the preacher, were in a moment forgotten in the excitement of the occasion and the yearn which possessed the heart of every villager to see “the cars”– and took but a short time to transfer the audience from the sanctuaries to the show-ground, where the locomotive, “St. Joseph” and a single car stood revealed to the astonished and delighted people. This afternoon and old barn near Sheldon’s bookstore was fired but Ghoh Glynn and myself put it out. Aleck Sheldon and Clem McNair went around this evening and got a call signed for a fire company.”

Feb. 11–Railroad celebration and supper at Kalamazoo House.”


Facts:  

  • 1845 – Rufus Darling had the contract for building the Michigan Central railway from Michigan City through to Grass Lake.
  • 5 Feb 1846 – Rufus Darling was invited to attend a railroad banquet on February 11, 1846.
  • 1844 – the Goss and Darling dry good store was the first store built in Kalamazoo.
  • 9 Jul 1916 – Emma Darling lived at Cedar and Rose streets.
  • 2 Feb 1846, the first train arrived in Kalamazoo.

Sources

Article: Kalamazoo Gazette (Kalamazoo, MI) 1916-07-09, Page 6 – “Darling has Invitation sent her father for Railroad Banquet in 1946.” Accessed 18 Dec 2019 via Genealogy Bank.

Train image. “Kalamazoo Railroads, Interurbans, Buses, and Transit History,” 2019. Migenweb.Org. Accessed 19 December 2019. http://www.migenweb.org/kalamazoo/railroadsinterurbThe back of this photograph identifies the subject as a locomotive built in 1836 that was the first steam engine to run from Detroit to Kalamazoo…. Date and location of the photo not given.”

Ancestor Sketch – Edward Lamb

Darling/McAllister/Lambe
By Don Taylor

Howell/Darling – Ancestor #54

List of Grandparents

  • Grandfather: Robert Harry Darling
  • 1st Great-grandmother: Hannah McAllister
  • 2nd Great-grandmother: Margaret Mary Lamb
  • 3rd Great-grandfather: Edward Lamb
  • 4th Great-grandfather: Edward Lamb

Edward Lamb (c. 1831-c. 1893)

Birth

Edward Lamb was christened on 15 January 1832 in Warcop, Westmorland, England[i]. As such, I suppose he was born in late 1831. His parents were Edward and Ann Lamb.  He was born in Warcop, Westmorland, England. It appears that he was the middle of three children. A sister, Isabella, was about two years older and another sister, Mary, about three years younger. All were born in Sanford/Warcop area[ii].

The death certificate for his daughter, Margaret, indicates that her father was born in Sanford, England.[iii]  As there is no Sanford, England and a very small village, Sandford, is next to Warcop, England, so I’m sure that is what was intended.

Childhood

Sandford is a very rural farm area today, and I’m quite certain it was the same then. His father, also named Edward, died when Edward, the child, was only eight years old.

Sir George Hayter’s coronation portrait of the Queen

While little Edward was growing up, slavery was abolished in the British Empire and Victoria ascended to the throne of England.

By the 1841 Census, nine-year-old Edward was living with his mother and his two sisters.[iv] Also, with the family was Dorothy Bradley; I’m not sure who Dorothy is or how she is related. They were enumerated in Soulby, Westmorland, England. (Westmorland is now Cambria, England).  My suspicion is that she is directly related and Ann and the children moved in with her for a short while after Ann was widowed. I need to do more research on Dorothy.

The 1851 Census finds Edward living with his mother, Ann, and his sister, Isabell, in Soulby. Ann has a 13-acre Farm. Both Isabella and Edward are “employed at home.”[v]

Marriage

Edward married Isabella Atkinson on 27 November 1853 in Warcop, Westmorland, England[vi]. They had five children.

Children of Edward and Isabella (Atkinson) Lamb[vii]

Child Birth Marriage Death
Jane Lamb Abt. 1852
Ann Lamb Bef. 26 Mar 1859
Margaret Mary Lamb 28 Apr 1860
Appleby in Westmorland
22 Aug 1878

Peter McAllister

14 Jan 1929
Mount Oliver, PA
James Cooper Lamb Bef 18 May 1862
Edward Lamb (3rd) Apr-May 1864
Kendal, Westmorland

Censuses

The 1861 Census finds Edward working as a Victualer. A victualer is the keeper of a restaurant or tavern.[viii] With him are Isabella and Margaret. Dorothy Bradley, who Edward was living with during 1841, is visiting them.[ix]

The 1871 Census finds Edward again living with his mother and two sisters.  Ann is listed as widowed and is the owner of the house and land they are on. Edward is listed as a laborer.[x]

Edward’s daughter Margaret moved to Maryport (50 miles westward on the coast) where she met and then married Peter McAllister. Margaret’s 1878 marriage registry entry indicates her father, Edward, was an Inn Keeper.[xi]

In 1881, the Census record indicates that Edward was back in Sandford and was the proprietor of a house and land and was an annuitant[xii]. He is listed as married, however, neither his wife nor his children were with him. Something to note is that in England, the Census records indicate where a person was on a particular date, not where they live. So, Edward’s wife and children could have been visiting someone on April 3rd, and the census records would have put them at that location.

The 1891 Census finds Edward living in Warcop again. There he is living “on his own means.” He is listed as married, but again, his wife does not appear with him.[xiii]

Death

Edward died on 1 November 1893 in Sandford of Cirrhosis of Liver and Pulmonary Congestion. His sister, Mary Lamb, was present at his death.

Locations

Edward Lamb (1831-1893) spent his entire life in Westmorland, England. All of his known life events took place within five miles of each other – Sandford, Warcop, Soulby, and Kirkby Stephen.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1IHUy2KEXd_5c9r4MkDhJ0eG5PlT_Cg0n&usp=sharing

Continue reading “Ancestor Sketch – Edward Lamb”

Ancestor Bio – Hannah Bell McAllister Mullholland

Darling – McAllister – Bell
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.I often have difficulties researching ancestors who lived in Europe. Hannah is no exception. She was born, lived and died all within 50 miles of Workington, England. I am not 100% confident that all of these facts are correct or that the sources are actually for Hannah, but I have spent much time looking for alternatives to this story without success.

Darling Research – Ancestor #53

List of Grandparents

  • Grandfather: Robert Harry Darling(1907-1969)
  • 1st Great-grandmother: Hannah McAllisterDarling White (1886-1913)
  • 2nd Great-grandfather: Peter McAllister(1852-1941)
  • 3rd Great-grandmother: Hannah Bell (c. 1822-1878)
  • 4th Great-grandfather: Jonathan Bell (c. 1801-____)

Hannah Bell (c. 1822-1878)

The date of Hannah’s birth is unknown; however, she was born in Workington, Cumberland county, England.[1] However, we know she was baptized on 9 March 1823 at St. Michael’s Church in Workington, Cumberland County, England. It appears that she was the oldest of at least four children born to Jonathan and Margaret Bell.

Her siblings include a brother and two sisters.

  • Charles     born 1824-1825
  • Mary         born 1826-1827
  • Jane           Born July-Sept. 1837

Childhood

There wasn’t an 1831 England census and I have been unable to find anything regarding Hannah before the 1841 Census. In it, Hannah is living with her father and (implied) three siblings, Charles, Mary, & Jane. Hannah’s mother, Margaret, is not in the household and is not found in any other records, so I’m sure that she died sometime between 1837 and 1841.

Marriage #1

On 08 Nov 1845, Hannah married Joseph McAllister in Cockermouth, Cumberland, England. Hannah and Joseph had three children.

  •       Margaret Mcallister  – Born 19 Oct 1846 – Died 12 Dec 1848
  •       Joseph McAllister      – Born in 1848 – died ____
  •       Peter McAllister        – Born 12 Feb 1852   Died 16 Jan 1941.

Adult

The 1851 Census finds Joseph and Hannah living at 60 Maine Street, Cockermouth, Cumberland, England, along with their son Joseph. An Ann Calbeck is living with them; she is a 61 year old visitor.

The couple moved to Workington by February 1852, as Peter was born there and not in Cockermouth.

Tragedy struck in the fall of 1855 when Hannah’s husband, Joseph, died.

Marriage #2

On 04 Nov 1855, Hannah married Charles Mayholland (Mulholland) in Workington, Cumberland, England. Hannah and Charles had three children.

  •       Hannah Mulholland  – 11 May 1856 – died 25 May 1856.
  •       Charles Mulholland   – Born c. 1859 – died ____
  •       John Mulholland        – Born c. 1862 – died ____

The 1861 Census finds the Charles Mayholland family living at 148 Bell St., Workington. Charles is a sawyer[2]. Nine-year-old Peter is using the surname of Mayholland (instead of McAllister). Also, in the household is the couple’s oldest son together, Charles.

The 1871 Census finds the Charles Mulholand household living at 23 Bell St. Workington. I can’t tell if they moved or if the streets were renumbered. In any event, the household consisted of Charles, Hannah, and their son John, who was 8 years old. Charles is a Cir (Circular?) Sawyer.

Death & Burial

Hannah died on 19 September 1878 at home (23 Hill Street, Workington) at the age of 55 after a long 2-year battle with cancer of the uterus.

Events by Location

  • Arthuret, Cumberland, England             1841 (Census)
  • Cockermouth, Cumberland, England    1845; 1851; (Marriage #1 & Census)
    1878 (Death)
  • Whitehaven, Cumberland, England       1922? (Birth)
  • Workington, Cumberland, England       1923; (Baptism)
    1852, 1855, 1861, 1871. (Birth of Peter,
    Marriage to Charles, & 2 Censuses)

Further Actions / Follow-up

  • Await receipt of Hannah’s death record then incorporate.
  • Find out where 23 and 148 Bell Street in Workington are today.

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Sources

  • 1841 Census – England and Wales Census, 1841, Family Search, Jonathan Bell – Arthur, Longtown, Cumberland – Image at Family History Center. “England and Wales Census, 1841,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M VXC : 28 May 2019), Jonathan Bell, Arthuret, Cumberland, England, United Kingdom; from “1841 England, Scotland and Wales census,” database and images, findmypast (http://www.findmypast.com : n.d.); citing PRO HO 107, The National Archives, Kew, Surrey. . https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M73F-VXC.
  • 1851 England Census, Ancestry, Joseph Allinson [McAllister] Cockermouth, Cumberland, England. Class: HO107; Piece: 2434; Folio: 483; Page: 15; GSU roll: 87114. https://search.ancestry.com/collections/8860/records/15194542.
  • 1861 England Census, Ancestry, Charles Mayholland – Workington, Cumberland. Class: RG 9; Piece: 3939; Folio: 42; Page: 21; GSU roll: 543210 Source Information
com. 1861 England Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: https://prf.hn/click/camref:1101l4wD7/creativeref:1101l27800 Operations Inc, 2005. Original data: Census Returns of England and Wales, 1861. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Oice (PRO), 1861. Data imaged from The National Archives, London, England. The National Archives gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to The National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU. https://search.ancestry.com/collections/8767/records/15093372.
  • 1871 England Census, Ancestry, Charles Mullholand Head – Workington, Cumberland, England. The National Archives; Kew, London, England; 1871 England Census; Class: RG10; Piece: 5243; Folio: 56; Page: 39; GSU roll: 847446. Source Information
com. 1871 England Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.
  • England & Wales, Civil Registration Death Index, 1837-1915, Ancestry, Hannah Mullholland – Jul-Aug-Sep 1878. (No Image). FreeBMD. England & Wales, Civil Registration Death Index, 1837-1915 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. https://search.ancestry.com/collections/8914/records/24120302.
  • England & Wales, Civil Registration Marriage Index, 1837-1915, Ancestry, Marriage – Joseph McAlister [McAllister] and Hannah Bell – Oct-Nov-Dec 1845. FreeBMD. England & Wales, Civil Registration Marriage Index, 1837-1915 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: com Operations Inc, 2006. Original data: General Register Office. England and Wales Civil Registration Indexes. London, England: General Register Office. © Crown copyright. Published by permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Office for National Statistics. You must not copy on, transfer or reproduce records without the prior permission of ONS. Database Copyright © 1998-2003 Graham Hart, Ben Laurie, Camilla von Massenbach and David Mayall.
  • England Births and Christenings, 1538-­1975, Family Search, Hannah Bell – 9 Mar 1823. “England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JWF1-XQN : 11 February 2018, Margaret in entry for Hannah Bell, 09 Mar 1823); citing , index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City; FHL microfilm 90,691, 90,692.
  • GRO – Entry of Birth (HM Passport Office), General Register Office, Birth – Margaret McAllister – 1846 – Workington, Cumberland, England . Volume 25, Page 104, No 350. https://www.gro.gov.uk/gro/content/certificates/Login.asp.
  • GRO – Entry of Birth (HM Passport Office), General Register Office, Peter McAllister – Cockermouth – Workington – 1852 Birth in district of Workington in the county of Cumberland County, England. Line 498 – Twelth February 1852 High Church Street Workington.
  • GRO – Entry of Marriage (HM Passport Office, ), General Register Office, 1845 Marriage – Joseph McAlister & Hannah Bell – (McAllister). General Register Office – Marriage Certificates – 1845, Quarter D, Volume 25, Page 111.
  • GRO – Entry of Marriage (HM Passport Office), General Register Office, 1855 Marriage – Charles Mayholland & Hanna [Bell] McAllister. General Register Office – Marriage Certificates – 466, Quarter D, Volume 10B, Page 646.
  • GRO – Entry of Death, General Register Office, Hannah Mullholland – 1878 Sep Qtr – Cockermouth, Vol B, Page 351, Line 35.


ENDNOTES

[1] The 1851 Census indicates that Hannah was born in Whitehaven, a town about 8 miles down the coast from Workington. All the other census and records indicate she was born in Workington.

[2] A Sawyer is someone who saws wood. (Wikipedia). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sawyer