Ancestor Sketch – James Walter

Darling-Swayze-Walter
By Don Taylor

Image by Kate Honish from Pixabay

It is always difficult to follow a person’s records when their name is recorded differently over the years.  James’ surname was recorded as “Waters,” “Walter,” and “Walters” over the many years. I have settled on Walter because it appears to be the surname he was buried with. James was a Patriot, serving in a Virginia artillery detachment during the Revolutionary War.

Howell/Darling – Ancestor #102

List of Grandparents

James Walter (aka Walters, aka Water) (1752-1838)

James Walter was born on either 16 or 17 Feb 1752.[i]in the Province of Maryland (now state of Maryland). He was the first child of John Walter and Ann Parker. He had five siblings, namely: William, Rebecca Conyers, Richard, Lawrence, and James.

Military service

Image courtesy of the Kentucky Secretary of State.

James was a Sergeant in the Revolutionary War. It appears that he joined up about 1777 in Virginia. On 02 Apr 1782 he was assigned to an Artillery detachment commanded by Capt-Lt Lewis Booker. He was known as the “Forage Master.” After the war, he received a warrant for 400 acres of Bounty Land, in what would become Kentucky, for his Revolutionary War Service to Virginia.

In 1793, when he was 40, he married Margaret Ann Swan of Virginia.

James and Margaret Ann (Swan) Walter had six (known) children.

    1. Nancy Anne Walter was born in 1788.
    2. Elkina Walter was born in 1789. she died in 1852.
    3. Catherine Ann Dent Walter was born on 15 Jun 1794 in. She married David Swayze on 30 Jan 1817 in Fairfield County, Ohio. She died on 16 Apr 1868 in Kalamazoo, Michigan, at the residence of her daughter, Elizabeth.
    4. James C Walter was born in 1800; he died in 1874.
    5. Elizabeth Walter was born before 05 Jan 1804[ii].
    6. John Walter was also born before 05 Jan 1804ii.

In 1804, James Walter executed a Deed of Trust transferring his property in Kentucky to Elijah Pollard of Frederick, Virginia, USA

James Walter died on 10 May 18381 in Lancaster, Fairfield County, Ohio, USA. He was buried at the Old Methodist Cemetery. Later, he was reinterred at the City Burial Plot, Lancaster, Fairfield County, Ohio.

Continue reading “Ancestor Sketch – James Walter”

James Walter – Buried in Ohio

James Walter (1752-1838) – Revolutionary War Soldier was buried in Lancaster, Fairfield County, Ohio

Darling-Swayze-Walter
By Don Taylor

In my searches for information on my wife’s 4th great-grandfather, James Walker (1752-1838), I kept running into a source that seemed to be the source used in many other people’s trees but was not cited. Eventually, I determined the mystery source. It was, The Official Roster of the Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried in the State of Ohio. It was compiled under the Direction of Frank D. Henderson, The Adjutant General.  A copy of the book is available online at one of my favorite sites, Archive.Org.

Document Image

Roster of Revolutionary War Soldiers buried in Ohio – Page 385 – James Walter

Transcription

On page 385 is an entry for Walter, James, (Fairfield Co.). It reads:

WALTER, JAMES, (Fairfield Co.)

Sgt “Forage Master.” Br Maryland, 1759. Mar Margaret Ann Levan, of Maryland, after the Revolutionary war, date not known. Children : Nancy, mar Leevir ; Elkanah, mar Rachel Decker ; Catherine Ann Dent, mar David Levayzee , Eliz, mar Chas Stockard 1, James Gurley 2; James, mar Polly ___  John, mar Belinda Reese. D May 10, 1838, Lancaster, O. Bur Old Methodist Cem and City Burial Plot Lancaster, O. Cem converted into park, bodies moved to new Cem in Lancaster, marking on head stone obliterated and identification impossible. MI: “James Walter, died May 10, 1838, aged 80 years, 2 mo, 23 da.”_ Jan 4, 1804 received transfer of 400 acres in Ky for serv in Rev War. Deeded in Frederick Co, Va. His name appears on a muster roll of a detachment of artillery commanded by Capt Lt Booker, belonging to the 1st Regt, dated Camp near Bacon Bridge, Apr 2, 1782, covering the months of Jan, Feb and Mch, 1782, which shows that he enlisted for the war. Ref: Natl No 12581 James Lincoln (Capt) Mass. Old Northwest Genealogical Quarterly Vol 3, p 74. Letter fr War Dept signed “Lutz Wahl,, Brigadier Gen, Acting the Adj Gen, by E. W. M.” Fur infor War Dept The Adj Gen Office Washington.

Discussion

I know there are a few errors. Certainly “Margaret Ann Levan” is Margaret Ann Swan and “David Levayzee” is David Swayzee. I’ve seen handwriting where a capital “S” could look like an “Le,” so, I understand the possibility for errors of this type. Also, the birthdate is not consistent with other sources.

Conclusion

Although I know there are minor errors in the entry, I’m tentatively accepting the following as facts:

James Walter

  • Born:   1759 in Maryland [Inconsistent – Alternate]
  • AKA:    “Forage Master”
  • Military Service:          Was a Sergeant in the Revolutionary War.
  • Military Service:          Assigned to an Artillery detachment commanded by Capt Lt Booker, belonging to the 1st Regt, dated Camp near Bacon Bridge, Apr 2, 1782, covering the months of Jan, Feb and Mch, 1782.
  • Marriage:        Margaret Ann Levan [Swan] after April 19, 1783.
  • Children:
    • Nancy, married Leevir [possibly Sevir];
    • Elkanah, married Rachel Decker ;
    • Catherine Ann Dent, married David Levayzee [Swayzee],
    • Eliz, married Chas Stockard 1, James Gurley 2;
    • James, married Polly ___
    • John, married Belinda Reese.
  • Property: 1804 received transfer of 400 acres in Ky for serv in Rev War. Deed in Frederick Co, Va.
  • Died: May 10, 1838, Lancaster, O.
  • Buried: Old Methodist Cemetery – reinterred: City Burial Plot Lancaster, Ohio. Cemetery
  • Headstone obliterated.
  • Note: Margaret Ann Levan [Swan] was “of Maryland”

Future Actions

This record embodies my experiences that finding one record leads to a dozen other things to research. In this case, I want to do the following future actions:

  1. Assess the birth records for James Walter.
  2. Learn more about Captain Lt. Booker and the 1st
  3. Learn more about the Camp near Bacon Bridge.
  4. Research further his marriage date to Margaret Swan.
  5. Research his land in Kentucky.
  6. Review DAR Natl No 12581 James Lincoln (Capt) Mass. and determine how that record fits with James Walter.
  7. Review Old Northwest Genealogical Quarterly Vol 3, p 74. Letter fr War Dept signed “Lutz Wahl, Brigadier Gen, Acting the Adj Gen, by E. W. M.”

ThruLines – Darling Part 2 – Bernard & Bertha Trumpi

ThruLines Thursday
Darling-Huber-Trumpi/Koch
DNA

By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.In Part 2 of my Darling ThruLinestm analysis, I’m looking closely at matches with wife’s maternal 2nd great-grandparents, Bernard[i] Trümpi (1844-1913) and Bertha (Koch) Trümpi (1862-1927).

ThruLinestm indicated that there are 3 (newly discovered) cousins who match Shirley through the Trümpi line.

J. S. Descended from Bebetta Trümpi

J. S. and Shirley share 15 cM of DNA on one chromosome, which is a very small amount.

ThruLinestm suggests that the connection is through great-aunt Babetta Trumpi. Babetta was the second of the seven children of Bernard and Bertha. Babetta also had another seven half-siblings from Bernard’s first marriage.  She was born 9 Oct 1888, emigrated to the United States Oct 1905, and married Wilhelm Fuchs on 16 Nov 1906 in Winnebago, Illinois. They had at least eight children, one of whom was Walter Fuchs. Walter died sometime before 2006.

Through the tree of J. S., I learned that Walter married Katherine Welty and had children, one of whom was J. S.’s grandparent.

With the suggested tree, J. S. would be a 2nd cousin 2x (2C2X) removed. Genetically, a 2C2X should share between 0 and 261 cM, which is in the expected range but is a very low amount. DNA Painter suggests a 7.5% probability for this relationship.

L. C. Descended from Freida A. Trumpi

L. C. and Shirley share 112 cM of DNA on 7 segments. Much more in keeping with what I would expect from a 2nd cousin.

ThruLinestm suggests that the connection is through great-aunt Frieda A Trümpi. Frieda was the fourth of the seven children of Bernard and Bertha. Freida also had another seven half-siblings from Bernard’s first marriage.  She was born 9 Aug 1895, emigrated to the United States in 1906, and married Adolph John Karch on 27 Feb 1913 in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois. They had at least five children, one of whom was Albert Adolph Karch (1913-1963). Walter died sometime before 2006. L. C. is one of Walter’s children.

Thus, the paper trail also suggests that L.C. and Shirley are 2nd Cousins. They share 112 cM of material across 7 segments, which fits within the range (46-515) expected for 2nd cousins, but at the low end (8.9% likelihood).

K.B. Descended from Freida A. Trumpi

K.B. and Shirley share 23 cM of DNA on 2 segments.

ThruLinestm suggests that the connection is also through great-aunt Frieda A Trümpi. I mentioned Frieda under L.C.’s relationship. Another of Frieda and Aldolph’s children was Elinor Frieda Karch (1914-1998). Elinor married John Patrick McCarthy and they had at least one child, Marcella Rae Whitmore (1935-1998).  Marcella is K.B.’s grandmother.

Thus, the paper trail also suggests that L.C and Shirley are 2C2R. They share 23 cM of material across 2 segments which fits within the range (0-261) expected for 2nd cousins, twice removed, but again, at the low end (8.3% likelihood).

Conclusion

I find it interesting that all of these ThruLinestm connections include much less DNA than would be expected. All within norms, but all in the bottom 10% for the paper relationship. That makes me wonder if there might be some event that would reduce the amount of DNA shared significantly. This might be a good candidate for chromosome mapping. I have a “gut feeling” that I have something wrong and that Bernard had two wives name Bertha.[ii] If so, that Babetta and Freida’s descendants had less shared DNA than expected would make sense.

Finally, if you are a descendant of Bernard Trümpi (1844-1913) or Bertha (Koch) Trümpi (1862-1927), please consider testing with Ancestry DNA; it is an excellent genealogical resource, which may help you broaden your tree.

All of my ThruLines posts are listed under the ThruLines Thursday category.

Disclaimer

The ads and some of the links on this website are “affiliate links.” If you purchase after clicking on them, I will receive a small commission which will help me pay for this site. Please see my Disclaimer Page for more information. Continue reading “ThruLines – Darling Part 2 – Bernard & Bertha Trumpi”

McAllister – Surname Saturday

McAllister Name Origin

McAllister is an Anglicized form of the Gaelic name, Mac Alasdair, meaning “son of Alasdair.” Alasdair is the Gaelic form of Alexander. There are dozens of forms for this surname. My wife’s family line has records both under McAllister and McAlister (one “l”).

Geographical

Worldwide there are approximately 52,878 people who bear the McAllister surname. The vast majority, over 38,000, in the United States, with England and Canada being distant second and third (about 6,000 and 5,000 respectively). In terms of frequency, Northern Ireland has the greatest proportion of the McAllister surname, where one in 526 people have the surname. Scotland is the second most frequent area for people surnamed McAllister.

 

My Wife’s Direct McAllister Ancestors

Historical

1920

My wife’s great-grandmother, Hannah (McAllister) Darling died in 1913.

                     Peter McAllister’s Passport Photo

Her father, Peter McAllister, was estranged from his wife and was rooming at 2237 Salisbury Street in Pittsburgh, PA. In 1920, Pennsylvania had 146 McAllister families (about 6% of the McAllister families in the US). Peter, his wife Margaret, his son John, his son Edward, and his son Joseph constituted 5 of those 146 McAllister families.

Peter was my wife’s immigrant McAllister Ancestor. Peter had three sons, Frank, Edward, and John, all of whom immigrated to the United States in 1886-1887. A fourth son, Joseph was born in New York in 1889. Frank died young and I have only found daughters descended from John. Edward and Joseph both had sons that would have carried on the McAllister surname (and their Y-DNA).

1881

In 1881, Peter, and his wife Margaret, lived at 5 High Church Street in Workington, England, in 1881. He worked as an Engineman and the couple had two children at census time. According to Forebears, in 1881, there were 900 incidences of the McAllister surname in England and another 2,649 in Scotland.

Oral History

Family oral history indicated that the McAllister family was Scots. Although I have not found any ancestors (yet) that lived in Scotland, the family did live in Workington, Cockermouth, and Carlisle, all in the north of England. Workington is only about 20 miles from Scotland across the Solway Firth (part of the Irish Sea) and about a 42 miles drive to Gretna Green, Scotland. Cockermouth and Carlisle are even closer to Scotland.

Family oral history also talked of a “Black Peter McAllister” who was a blockade runner during the US Civil War. Apparently called “Black Peter” because of being bad.  Anyway, second great-grandfather Peter McAllister was too young to have been “Black Peter” (aged 10 to 15 during the Civil War).  However, his grandfather was also named “Peter.” Peter, the elder, would have been born in the late 1700s and is a candidate for having been involved in the US Civil War. I need to do more research regarding Peter McAlister, the elder. It would be great to find information regarding the McAllister’s being involved in the US Civil War.

My wife’s known McAllister relatives.

My records have identified 105 direct-line descendants of Peter McAllister (the elder).

Sources:

 

Darling DNA – ThruLines – Part 1

ThruLines Thursday
Darling
DNA

My Wife’s Darling-Swayze-McAllister-Lamb Line

Introduction

DNA image by Caroline Davis2010 via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

My wife’s mother has had her DNA tested, so rather than using my wife’s matches, I’m going to use her mother’s matches to focus on my wife’s maternal line. It will provide closer and better matches on that like. Consequently, I’m starting with my wife’s great-great-grandparents, my mother-in-law’s great-grandparents.

One of the problems with ThruLines is that it only considers individuals that match genetically AND have a tree at Ancestry where the individual had identified which person is them. So, my wife’s half-aunt who did test with Ancestry doesn’t show up at all because she doesn’t have a tree. Because of that, there were no matches with my wife’s four maternal great-grandparents (other than my wife’s mother).

DNA Relationships

Likewise, there were no ThruLines matches with my wife’s Darling or Swayze 2nd great-grandparents. However, there were three matches on the McAllister/Lamb lines.

There is “CM,” who is a 2nd cousin of my wife’s mother and is well known to us. The 101 cM of DNA shared between them is well within the expected range for 2nd cousins.  No surprise there.

The other two are descendants of my mother-in-law’s great-uncle Joseph McAllister.  “CK” and my mother-in-law share 176 cM of DNA across 11 segments and “IG” and my mother-in-law share 99 cM of DNA across 4 segments. Both within the range expected for second cousins to share. Both “CK” and “IG” were unknown cousins before the DNA test match results, however, both their parents were known.

Conclusion

If you are a descendant of Rufus Holton Darling (1815-1857), Elizabeth Jane Swayze (1818-1896), Peter McAllister (1852-1941), or Margaret Mary Lamb (1850-1929),  please consider testing with Ancestry DNA; it is an excellent genealogical resource and can help you broaden your tree too. I’d love to learn how you and my wife are related.

Disclaimer

The ads and some of the links on this website are “affiliate links.” If you purchase after clicking on them, I will receive a small commission which will help me pay for this site. Please see my Disclaimer Page for more information.

All of my ThruLines posts are listed under the ThruLines Thursday category