New York Times – Rotogravure – 30 June 1918

The Library of Congress has a new collection of The New York Times Rotogravure from World War I.  I was excited to see that the Library of Congress had the same material that I have which meant that I could use it and not need to scan my own collection. The LoC quality was excellent; they had whole pages instead of my partial pages. Then I saw that they don’t have all of the issues.  I looked at my collection and the next one I was going to write about was the June 30, 1918, issue. It isn’t available in the Library of Congress Rotogravure collection. My search of the collection showed they have June 2, June 9, June 16, and June 23, but not June 30, 1918.

Top half of the first of six pages included from teh New York Times, 30 June 1918, Rotogranure
Top half of the first of six pages included from my 30 June 1918 collection. This half of the page includes: “Jitney Tank;” Lieutenant Aviator Leps; Lieutenant Guerin; Lieutenants Reno, Fonck, and Milton; a Shell-Shelter Village; and a Camouflaged French Road. Click the image or here for the OCRed pages.

Oh my — my collection suddenly became much more important. If I have editions that the Library of Congress does not have, then my collection might be unique. If so, I really need to preserve it digitally. Sadly, in the pages that I have for 30 June 1918, one photo was cut out. It affects that page and the reverse side but not the other pages. I photographed all the pages I have from this June 30th 1918 edition. Then I OCRed (used Optical Character Recognition) the images. There is one page that contains a full-page ad for Tintex, but no war photos, so I did not OCR that page and did not include it in my final product.  I assembled the OCRed images into a single Portable Document File. I wish that I had the technology to either photograph the entire image or to be able to adequately stitch the images together; however, I was not happy with the results of my trying to electronically stitch the images.

Here is my attempt with the 30 June 1918 issue.  I hope you find the images and stories as interesting and as fascinating as I do.

Beauties at City Hall, Boston, 1916, Included Donna Montran

Got to love the vocabulary used in old newspapers. “Pulchritude” is the kind of word that if you Google it, you can see how many on-line dictionaries there are. When I googled it, the first non-dictionary entry for the word’s use was on page three.

Boston Post, 12 Dec 1916
Via Newspaper Archive

In a previous article, I mentioned that Donna tried out to become the “Miss Boston” representative at the big preparedness bazaar to be held at the Grand Central Palace in New York. Well, I found another article about the contest Donna was involved in. According to the “Boston Post” of December 12, 1916, more than 50 girls had already tried out for Miss Boston and a “big rush” of over 100 more girls was expected. The Post’s article included photos of ten of the girls vying for Miss Boston. You never guess who the first girl shown in the article was?  One of two girls on page one was grandma, Donna Montran.  This newspaper photo is one of the earliest photos we have of Donna as a closeup. The article goes on to say that Donna is a blonde even though the photo doesn’t look that way.

The paper printed the names and addresses of the applicants.  Imagine what would happen today if a newspaper published the home addresses of 49 pulchritude contestants. In December 1916, Donna was living at 64 Bennett in Brighton (Boston), MA.

By the way, “preparedness bazaar” referred to actions to prepare the United States for entry into World War I. The United States didn’t enter the war until four months later, on 6 April 1917. However, in December 1916, businessmen, intent on making money on the war, promoted military preparedness and the beauty contests were part of their strategy to create hype to encourage the US to enter the war.

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Two George Scoggins’ in Cobb County, Georgia?

Two George Scoggins’ in Cobb County, Georgia?

I’m always prepared to start over a particular line of research if an inconsistency occurs and it seems I have one in my Scoggins Project.   
I was doing research, for a close friend, on a Scoggins line in Cobb County, Georgia.  He knew virtually nothing about the line so I figured I’d give him a help. As I researched his great-grandfather I quickly found him in the 1940 census.  I was quite certain I had the correct family. His grandmother was in the household as the daughter of the head. The ’40 census indicated they lived in the same county in 1935, so finding them in a nearby location, in the same county in 1930 made sense. Continuing back in time, I found them in the same county 1920 (about 10 miles away). These moves in the county didn’t surprise me because in the records, they were renting the farm that Mr. Scroggins was working.  
Snapshot showing birthdate of 6 Oct 1877
From US World War 1 Draft Registrations
Thanks to Ancestry.Com

 I then found him in the World War I draft registrations.  It was interesting to note that it said he was two years younger than his cemetery marked indicated.  I wasn’t too concerned about that because the birthdate, 6 October, was the same in both cases.  I found consistency in most everything I found.  Certainly there were a few here and there, the names were G George, George C, George G, and, of course, George without an initial.  One record said his middle name was Lester which concerned me somewhat, but not a lot.

In the 1910 census, I found the family in the next county over.  That was really good, because I remember my friend mentioning his ancestors had a farm way back when in that county, near where the census indicated they were living.  Then, I found him in the 1900 census.  Poo.  Not right.
Snapshot from 1900 US Federal Census
Thanks to Ancestry.Com

The 1900 census is fantastic because it includes the birth month and year of everyone.  The census indicated that George’s birth month was December and the year 1878, not 1875-1877 as the other records I had for George indicated.  The siblings were basically the same as I had been documenting along the way. Clearly this was a different George Scoggins than the one I had been tracking. But, sibling names and many other bits of information were similar, but the birthdate was way off. It would be easy to say that the info was wrong and then continue on my merry way, but I know that something isn’t right.  

Person back at their drawing board.
Public Domain
Via Wikimedia Commons
I will go back to ALL of the original sources I used and analyze them very closely knowing in retrospect that there were two George Scoggins in Cobb County, born about three years apart, both of whom had siblings with the same names. It will take some time, but I will eventually untangle the mess. I’ll probably even find that the two George’s are cousins or otherwise related.  I’ll be surprised if they are not.  As I said, when you are certain something isn’t right, be ready to drop all assumptions, start over completely, and document all your decisions carefully.

Genealogy Bank

Check out Genealogy Bank as a source for gifts.  They are currently running a Christmas Special, on gift memberships.  But a Genealogy Bank membership would make a great birthday present or a thank you present anytime.

I use and prefer Genealogy Bank over the other newspaper archive services.