My Best of 2016 & Expectations for 2017

Happy New Year - 2017

Happy New Year – 2017

My Best of 2016

I changed my blogging platform during 2016. Switching from Blogger to WordPress was a challenge and switching from blog.dtaylorgenealogy.com to www.dontaylorgenealogy.com was even worse.  My former domain, dtaylorgenealogy.com was supposed to redirect to the new domain, but it never worked reliably.  I don’t know why. Eventually, I just let the old domain lapse. Anyway, because of the changes, statistics are not available in one place but rather are spread between the two like apple butter and orange marmalade. Both are good on toast but don’t go together at all.

WordPress

As I mentioned, in September I switched to WordPress from Blogger. It has taken much longer to rebuild my direct following then I expected. I still have more “followers” via Blogger than I do via WordPress. As I am no longer posting to the Blogger site, anyone subscribing to via Blogger should subscribe using WordPress using the widget Right Column – Top instead. Actually, if you want to follow my genealogy blog, that is the best place to do so.  Facebook, Google Plus, and Twitter are nearly as reliable to follow with.

Looking at the site statistics on the WordPress site, interestingly, the number one posting in views is a 2013 article regarding the McAllister Murder – Murder Suspect and Wife – Jan 20th. [Darling Research]

My number 1 article from 2016 is an April article posted on the Blogger site and moved to the WordPress site regarding the MGS Spring Workshop. [Reviews]

Finally, the number one posting since I made the switch to WordPress is about the Birth Record of Patience A. Roberts. [Roberts Research]

Google Search is, by far, the most common referrer to my site. FaceBook is a distant second.

Blogger

The review of Family Tree Maker Mac 3 that I did in 2013 is still, by far, my most read posting on Blogger. [Reviews]

My most viewed family history posting on Blogger was an article about my William Price (1782-1846). [Howell Research]

Finally, my most read Blogger post, and my most read posting of 2016 was Compulsive Searching – Bert Allen Roberts (1903-1949).  That is an article about my excitement regarding researching my grandfather, show name I only determined a few weeks before.[Roberts Research]

Again, Google was the most common referrer to my site, and Facebook a second. Ow.ly was the third most common referrer. I post links to my site to Facebook, Google Plus, and Twitter using HootSuite which uses ow.ly as the URL to shorten the link.

I think the most interesting posting I have done during the past year are was Compulsive Searching – Bert Allen Roberts (1903-1949). [Roberts Research]

2017 – The Future

Certainly, my five major research lines will take the majority of my effort.  These are my ancestors on the Brown and Roberts lines and my wife ancestral lines of Darling and Howell.  Also, the vaudeville career of my grandmother, Donna Montran, will be a major thread in my activities.  I’ll probably drop activity regarding the “Great War” as a major category and move it under “Other.”

My volunteer work at the Scarborough Historical Society has been growing.  I’ve developed a website for them and expect that I’ll post quite a lot there. Check it out at scarboroughhistoricalsociety.org.  I suspect that much of my work that I post there I will cross post here. So, look for SHS as a new major topic on my Blog.

I am also involved with the Maine Genealogical Society and the Greater Portland Chapter of the Maine Genealogical Society. I anticipate that I will be posting content regarding them, their activities, and my participation in those activities.

I have several projects that I am working on. I expect to continue working on many of them and posting about them.  I may break active projects out of “Other” into its own category.

DNA – Genetic Genealogy is a really important part of my research. It has provided clues to determining my biological father. It has also provided the starting point for connections to cousins I might otherwise have never gotten to know. I also have a significant project to learn the biological father of my half-sister Glennis.  I think I am zeroing in on potential candidates. This is a very exciting project for both Glennis and me.

Finally, I still have my food and travel blog, D. Taylor’s Food and Travel. I don’t spend a lot of energy on it, but you might find it interesting.

My blogs are:

Blogs I maintain for others:


Please let me know what you would like me to focus upon on my blog posting activities.  Are there specific areas you would like me to focus upon?  If so, please let me know.  Are there any of my posts that you found to be particularly interesting? Please use the comments form below. If you do not want your comments made public, please add “Please do not publish” to the first line of text in your message.

————-Disclaimer————-

 

Why I’ll never do business with MyHeritage again.

NOTE:  It has been two and a half years since I wrote the review below. It was true at the time, however, in the ensuing years they appear to have improved processes.  Still not perfect, their relationship with their customers appears to have improved substantially.  From what others say, it appears they are refunding payments when not intended. (See comments at the end of the posting.)  Their communications about the refund process is not particularly good, in that they should inform the customer they have received their request and they should inform the customer it is be reviewed as appropriate.  But, all in all, my feelings have softened as they seem to be responsive to their customers. I would do business with them again.  (Updated 18 Jan 2019)




It is seldom that a company angers me enough that I say, “I’ll NEVER, NEVER EVER, do business with that company again.” MyHeritage has successfully achieved that status with me.

I was enticed to use MyHeritage when 23 and Me eliminated their own ancestry trees and transferred them to MyHeritage. My tree was transferred to MyHeritage and I eventually subscribed to them because of 23 and Me’s endorsement. I didn’t find their service particularly useful and decided to drop them.

Rant On

First of all, it seems that every responsible company I do business with sends a notification a week or two before an automatic renewal takes effect. On rare occasions, when a company doesn’t send such a notification, I have always been able to call them the following business day, have the automatic renewal canceled, and have the money refunded. Not so with MyHeritage.

screen-shot-2016-10-23-at-6-48-17-am-copyA few months ago I had gone onto Pay Pal and canceled my automatic renewal. I thought that I was done. But when I was charged, I checked Pay Pal and found there were two entries for MyHeritage.  The first one I had canceled. But there was a second entry.  It had an expiration date of Dec 13, 1901.  I had no idea that I had to cancel that too.  I thought, no problem, I’ll just call them, they’ll refund the money, and we’ll be square – No harm, no foul.

I was wrong. I explained I hadn’t used the service in months. I explained that I canceled one service. I explained that I didn’t realize I need to cancel a service that had an expiration date of 1901, to no avail.  After talking at length with a “customer service representative” the bottom line was, “We typically don’t refund renewal fees.” Finally, I asked to speak with a supervisor.

I waited several minutes. Finally, the same customer service representative came back. I couldn’t speak with his supervisor, but his supervisor said I could have half my money back and he’d allow the annual subscription to remain active for the year. Certainly, I felt disrespected by the supervisor who wouldn’t even speak with me. An unhappy customer with a problem deserves being spoken to; that is why supervisors usually have the flexibility to go outside standard protocols.

MyHeritage renewal canceled
Both entries now canceled

The good news is that I did receive half of my money back ($59.40). The bad news is that I paid half-price for a subscription that don’t want and I’ll never, never ever, use.

I believe Pay Pal is also culpable. Further investigation revealed that MyHeritage’s automatic subscriptions do expire in 80 years.  Had Pay Pal displayed an expiration date of Dec 13, 2095, instead of Dec 13, 1901, I would not have missed that I needed to cancel that also,

There are only a handful of companies that I’ll never do business with. Congratulations to MyHeritage, you have made my list.

Rant Off

Could MyHeritage come off my list? Sure; but, they would need to take the next step in making this former customer happy.  Have you had problems with MyHeritage and their renewal process?  If so, feel free to comment below. I’ll publish some of the better comments.

Website Review – Lost Cousins

Tech Tuesday – Lost Cousin

Review by Don Taylor

I recently was listening to a podcast about the UK based service Lost Cousins. I had heard of it before, but I hadn’t given it a try nor had I looked at it for what it might be able to do to help folks in their genealogical research.

The primary purpose of LostCousins.Com is to help you find lost cousins so that you may better collaborate in your genealogical research. Most sites that connect you with other researchers do so based upon name and submitted tree information. This leads to many potential connections but few actual relatives. Consequently, many connections are unlikely to respond to your queries because they are too distant, often related by marriage, sometimes by multiple marriages. Lost Cousins does it a bit different; they focus on the quality of matches to other researchers rather than the quantity of matches. They use key census records as the key to finding cousins. You tag an ancestor in a particular census, on a specific page, with a relationship to you. Another person does the same thing. For example, in the 1880 Census, my 2nd Great-Grandfather is listed.  If the same person on the same page of the census is your ancestor too, then we are related.

Signing up is very easy to do. The site has a free level which doesn’t require you to provide a credit card nor detailed personal information.  You only need to subscribe (pay) if you find a lost cousin that you want to contact. (A subscriber may contact you, but you need to be a subscriber to initiate the first contact.) Even then, the service is very inexpensive (£10 per year).

Although Lost Cousins uses eight specific census records, the majority of users enter data into either the 1881 England & Wales Census or the 1880 US Census. The vast majority of my ancestors were in the United States in 1880, so I began entering my ancestors into the system.  For the 1880 Census, they ask you to enter the Roll / Film number, Page / Sheet number and letter, Surname, Forename, Age, and Relationship to you (typically, “blood relative” or “direct ancestor”).  In my case, into the 1880 US Census, I entered Roll 575, Page 374A, Surname Barber, Forename Frank, Age 40, and Direct Descendant. (Note: I entered “Frank” as he was entered into the census and not “Franklin” as was his actual name.) Then, I entered a second person, Asa Roberts and all was well. Neither of them had any cousin matches, but that was okay. I knew I have lots more ancestors to enter.

After only two entries, I ran into MY problem. I realized, particularly in some of my Family Tree Maker corrupted source entries (see Review and Rant), but also, some of my early entries didn’t have all of the information that I should have entered. Sure, I had enough information to find the record again, Name, Place, and Census Year is sufficient to search and find most entries, but it wasn’t the right information to enter into Lost Cousins. So, I need to go back and clean up some of my Census Record citations. That’s okay; I should clean them up regardless. I  entered other direct ancestors into the system, but so far no matches to cousins.

The eight censuses that Lost Cousins uses are:

  • 1841 England & Wales
  • 1880 United States
  • 1881 Canada
  • 1881 England & Wales
  • 1881 Scotland
  • 1911 England & Wales
  • 1911 Ireland
  • 1940 United States

In the two I entered, I did the “Search for Cousins.” No matches.  I’m not surprised. With only two entries in the 1880 US Census, Lost Cousins suggests I only have a match potential of 0.06%.

There are two ways for me to increase the likelihood of finding a lost cousin. First, I need to enter more of my ancestors from any of the above censuses into their system. Second, more cousins need to register and enter their ancestors into the system. I can take care of the first item, but I need you to help out by you to fulfill the second item. So, if you aren’t registered with Lost Cousins, I encourage you to register. Maybe, we are lost cousins, but if you don’t register we may never know.

The process doesn’t take long, and there is a potential for a big hit. Consequently, I think it is time well spent. The process of adding ancestors brought to my attention the need for me to clean up some of the census citations in my records.  Sigh….

Note:  Lost Cousins also produces a newsletter that registered individuals may subscribe to. Past newsletters are searchable, so registration may not only provide leads on lost cousins but may also provide leads regarding other websites and resources.

Reminder to Self:

  • Never take shortcuts in source citations!

My Future Actions:

  • Clean up my sources for the 1880 US Census, the 1881 England & Wales Census, and the 1881 Canadian Census.
  • Enter remaining ancestors with 1880 or 1881 census entries into Lost Cousins.

———- DISCLAIMER ———-

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Hugh Ellis Roberts (1884-1908), The 1900 Census, & Family Search Duplicate Merging

Family Search Duplicate Merging

I like to control and manage my family tree information. As such, I’ve never been a fan of systems where family trees are managed by many individuals. I tend to be concerned that other individuals aren’t quite as thorough as I like to think that I am. I also like to work from sources and not rely on other individual’s family trees for anything other than “hints,” so I don’t really use other people’s family trees much.

Family Search – Family Tree – Find

I was researching Hugh Ellis Roberts and couldn’t find much information. I was having such a bad time that I decided to use Family Search Family Trees to see if I could gain any leads there. After selecting [Family Tree} [Find], entering my subject’s name and year of birth the system returned 50 different entries. Four of the first five entries were my particular Hugh Ellis Roberts. They all had the same birth year, all had the same death year and they all had the same spouse. None of the entries had any sources for their information at all. Sigh…. I decided I couldn’t let four entries for the same individual stand so I selected the one that had the most information, parents and children names, and began merging the other entries into that one. It wasn’t as difficult as I thought it would be. I also corrected the marriage date from “Oct 1900” to “7 Oct 1900” and associated my source to that fact. There is still a problem with his being married to three different people, Clara, Clora, and Cora Dell Scott. I’ll merge those identities up when I work on Clara’s biography and decide on what I really think her name was. (Different records all are interpreted differently.) There are still other issues with the family unit on Family Search Family Trees, such as one of his sisters being duplicated, but I’ll fix it as I work on the family unit.

The 1900 Census

Because Hugh Ellis Roberts was born after the 1880 Census and he died in 1908 finding him in the 1900 Census was a must. I knew that his father died in 1887, so using his name wouldn’t help. I searched and searched and never found him. I also knew that he was married in 1900 in Illinois, so I figured he had to be in Illinois somewhere, probably in either Jefferson or Franklin County. Still no luck. Then I decided to search Illinois for people born in Illinois in 1884 with the surname “Roberts” and nothing else. I then looked closely at any individuals born in July. I found a “Heine” Roberts, living with his mother Anna and a sister Talaramer. His mother’s name was Patience Anna. Could it be? Looking closer at the entry,

I saw that Talaramer was a transcriber’s attempt to read a nearly illegible Florence. The birth year and place for Anna matched Patience Anna, the birth date matched the month, year, and place for Florence, and the birth month, year, and place all matched Hugh. Last, but not least, it was in Franklin County (which borders Jefferson County), Finally, I had found Hugh Ellis Roberts in the 1900 Census.

Hint: When looking for someone in a census, try ignoring the first names of individuals and just search for a surname with other identifying criteria.

RB-08 – Hugh Ellis Roberts

2 July 1884 – 30 August 1908

Hugh Ellis Roberts[i] was born in July 1884 in Illinois. His marriage license indicated that he was 18 when he was married in 1900; however, I think it is more likely that the 16-year-old Hugh lied about his age in order to marry without parental permissions. One on-line source indicates that he was born in Jefferson County, Illinois, however, the marriage license of his son, Bert Allen Roberts indicate that he was born in Benton (Franklin County, Illinois.[ii] According to other researchers, Hugh died on 30 August 1908.,[iii] Several of his children’s marriage licenses identify their father was deceased when they married in the 1920s, thus confirming the early death. Additionally, Hugh’s wife remarried in 1909.

He is the fourth known child of Asa Ellis Roberts (1835-1887), aged 49, and Patience Anna Marshall (1845-1919), aged 39. Asa and Patience had three other known children together, Charles Wilson, Rosa Della, and Florence Elizabeth Roberts. Asa was married previously to Cynthia Minerva Toney and that had six children so Hugh was the youngest of ten children of Asa. His six half-siblings were William, George, Margaret, Calvin, Sarah, and Monroe.

When Hugh was only three, his father, Asa Ellis Roberts, died (8 October 1887 – Spring Garden, Jefferson County, Illinois).

The 1900 census indicates that Hugh may have had a nickname of “Heine.” The 15-year-old was living with his mother, Anna, older sister Florence, and a niece, Nellie Roberts. It is unclear whose child Nellie was. The 1900 census indicates that only five of Anna’s six children were living, so it is possible that Nellie was the child of her dead child. Mother and son were farming in Barren Township.[iv]

On 7 October 1900, Hugh married Clara Dell Scott (1884-1945), daughter of Samuel Vaden Scott (1863-1931) and Amanda Jane Hale (?-1889) in Ina, Jefferson County, Illinois)[v]. They were both 16-years-old, however, they both indicated that they were 18 on the marriage registration.[vi]

A quick seven months later, Hugh and Clara had their first child.[vii]

The Children of Hugh and Clara included:

Harry Ray Roberts, born on 22 May 1900 in Franklin Co. (Franklin Co., Illinois). He married Lillie Vernea Higgins in 1922.
Carrie Mae Roberts, born in 1901. (I have not researched her further, yet.)
Bert Allen Roberts, born on 20 September 1903 in Sesser (Franklin, Illinois), died on 1st May 1949 in Elwood (Madison County, Indiana), aged 45. He married Essie Pansy Barnes on 13 May 1922. They had 5 children: Pansy, Bert, Hugh, Helen and John.
Mabel Ilean Roberts, born on 2 June 1908 in Lena (Stephenson County, Illinois, United States), USA. She married Olan B Hart on 3 January 1925.

It appears that the Roberts family moved from Franklin County to Stephenson County between 1903 and 1908.

Several researchers indicate that Hugh died on 30 August 1908 at the age of 24. I have been unable to confirm that; however, his wife, Clara, is reported as remarried in 1909 per the 1910 Census.[viii]

Continued Research

Confirm death date.
Determine cause of death.
Confirm day of birth.

[Note: I ordered a death certificate from Stephenson County Clerk & Recorder on 19 Feb 2016, which should answer all the above questions. If unsuccessful, will try again with Franklin County.]

Find Property Record for Anna’s farm ownership.

ENDNOTE

[i] Note: Family Search ID: LR7R-9J1
[ii] Source: Indiana Marriages, 1811-2007 – Family Search (Other)
[iii] Ibid.
[iv] Source: 1900 Census; Anna Roberts, Barren Township, Franklin, Illinois, United States; citing sheet 10A, family 182.
[v] Source: Family Search (Other) – Illinois, County Marriages, 1810-1934 / Ellis Roberts & Clara Dell Scott, 1900 – Family Search (Internet)
[vi] Source: Illinois, County Marriages, 1810-1934; Ellis Roberts & Clara Dell Scott, 1900
[vii] Note: They say the first child can come anytime, the rest take nine months.
[viii] Source: 1910 Census; Indiana, Sullivan, Turman, District 0178, Hosea Adams

———- DISCLAIMER ———-

Back to Heredis & Marion Reed Roos

Back to Heredis….

As many of you know who have been following my frustrations with software, trying to find the perfect tool to manage my genealogical research, I’ve tried many different products (Roots Magic, Mac Family Tree, Heredis, Reunion, and more). I use a Mac, and I’ve never been happy using a Windows product on my Mac using windows emulation products. I used Reunion 11 for several weeks and feel that I learned the good and the bad of it.  The process for my handling sources and applying those sources to facts that I enter for individuals is really good. The bad, I’ve not been successful importing a GEDCOM file into Reunion and having the media associated with a source connecting properly.  Taking the time to reconnect the media is time-consuming and frustrating.  The other issue I had with Reunion was the reporting.  What I like to do for my blog is have the software generate a fairly reasonable outline of an individual and then I can rewrite the outputted draft story of the individual into a form I like better and add other details.  I found Reunion didn’t provide a particularly good draft story.
Heredis 2015
Logo
I recalled from my previous use of Heredis 2015 that it seemed to write a draft life story much better, because of that, I thought I’d give it a try again and I’m much happier with the results.
Although the GEDCOM export from Family Tree Maker and the subsequent import into either Reunion or Heredis seemed to be similar, reconnecting media to sources seems to be easier in Heredis.  So, because of my experiences with both products, I’ve decided to return to using Heredis as my primary tool for managing my family tree.
Is it perfect, no, but it seems to be the best for me. The biggest negative issue is the complete lack of management of to-do or task lists.  I can easily overcome that by using another program to do so. I have long used Evernote to document interesting information I find. I can readily adapt it to act as my to-do and genealogical tasks.  Probably even better than most genealogical programs. I also can use vJournal (an Evernote plugin) to document my research activity. Again, probably better than research logs within genealogy software.
So, I think I have my solution. I’ll use Heredis as my Genealogy management software. It will relate my electronic media with my sources and relate them to individuals as appropriate. Then I’ll use Evernote to manage my to-do tasks. I’ll use vJournal for a research log which will store its information in Evernote. Finally, I’ll use Heredis to export reports that contain the basics of an individual’s life story and also provides the endnotes citing the sources of each item I rewrite using Microsoft Word. I think it is a good plan.
Marion Josephine Reed Roos Mowbray is the first individual I exported a biography sheet for and then rewrote it for my style of writing.  Will I get better with it, I’m sure I will, but I’m happy with the results so far.

Marion Josephine Reed (Roos) Mowbray (1898-1977)

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 5

Marion Reed Roos (1920)
Alfred University Yearbook: Kanakadea 1920

Marion Josephine Reed Roos was born on 22 December 1898 in Buffalo (Erie, New York), USA, died on 3 September 1977 in Weymouth (Norfolk, Massachusetts), USA, aged 78[i].
She is the daughter of Edward H  Roos (1856-1933), aged 42, and  Christiana  Roos (1860-), aged 38.  She was the youngest of five children. The family consisted of four children (2 boys and 2 girls) all born in the five years between 1880 and 1884. Then was a 14-year gap when Marion was born.
Events in the life of Marion include:
In 1900, she was living with her parents and all four siblings at 364 Elm Street in Buffalo (Erie County), New York.[ii]
In 1910, she as living with her parents and just her youngest sibling, Lenora, at 636 Linwood Ave in Buffalo (Erie County), New York).[iii]
In 1917, the family appears to be just her and her parents, living at 584 Linwood Ave. Buffalo (Erie County), New York. Her father is listed in the city directory as a building contractor.[iv]
In 1918 Marion became a freshmen at Alfred University in Alfred (Allegany County), New York ) where she studied science.[v]
Alfred University is about 90 miles southeast of her home in Buffalo.
The 1920 Census reports her still living with her parents at 584 Linwood Ave in Buffalo (Erie County), New York and working as a grammar school teacher; however, she was still attending Alfred University, and was the Junior Class president and the editor-in-chief of the “Fiat Lux”.[vi], [vii]  Because the 1920 Census was enumerated on 1 January, I believe Marion was probably home during the Christmas break, which would make sense.
She graduated from Alfred University in 1921 in Alfred (Allegany, New York), Alfred University.[viii]
She returned to living with her parents living at 584 Linwood in Buffalo (Erie County), New York) and was living there in 1923.[ix]
In 1924, she married Elmer Stephens Mapes (1898-1974), who was the son of James Mapes (1863-) and Myrtle E [Mapes] (1869.[x] They were both 25 years old when they married.  It is apparent that they met at Alfred University. Both were on the staff of the “Fiat Lux.”
By 1926, the couple had moved to Bristol, (Bristol County), Rhode Island.[xi]
In 1929, their first daughter (living) was born in Massachusetts.

The 1930 Census reports the couple living in Bristol, RI at 895 Hope Street. Elmer is the acting superintendent of schools, an amazing accomplishment for the 31-year-old Elmer.[xii]

Their second daughter (living) was born in 1934 also in Massachusetts.
Sometime in the 1950s, the family moved to Weymouth (Norfolk County), Massachusetts.
Marion’s husband, Elmer, died in 1974 in Weymouth, MA.
Marion died on 3 September 1977, in Weymouth (Norfolk County), Massachusetts.[xiii]
Further information regarding Marion Roos Mapes and an Ancestry tree are available at  http://person.ancestry.com/tree/71471944/person/38235800431 .

ENDNOTES

 

[i] Sources: Massachusetts Death Index, 1970-2003 (Other) – Social Security Death Index (Other) – Social Security Death Index / Marion Mapes – 039-16-3413 – Ancestry.com (Other) – Massachusetts Death Index, 1970-2003 – Ancestry.com (Other)
[ii] Source: 1900 Census / Buffalo Ward 6, Erie, New York; Roll: 1026; Page: 17B – Ancestry.com (Digitizing)
[iii] Source: 1910 Census / Buffalo Ward 20, Erie, New York; Roll: T624_947; Page: 4B – Ancestry.com (Digitizing)
[iv] Source: U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 / 1917 – Buffalo, New York, Page 1276 – Roos – Ancestry (Other)
[v] Source: Kanakadea 1918 / Page 52 – Ancestry.com (Other)
[vi] Source: 1920 Census / Buffalo Ward 23, Erie, New York; Roll: T625_1107; Page: 6B – Ancestry.com (Digitizing)
[vii] Sources: Kanakadea 1920 / Page 45 – Ancestry.com (Other) – Kanakadea 1920 / Page 31 – Ancestry.com (Digitizing) – Kanakadea 1920 / Page 80 – Ancestry.com (Digitizing)
[viii] Source: Kanakadea 1921 / Page 25 – Ancestry.com (Digitizing)
[ix] Source: U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 / 1923 – Buffalo, New York, Page 1531, Roos – Ancestry.com (Digitizing)
[x] Source: 1930 Census / Bristol, Bristol, Rhode Island; Roll: 2168; Page: 17A – Ancestry.com (Digitizing)
[xi] Source: U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 / 1926 – Bristol, Rhode Island, USA, Page 470 – Mapes – Ancestry.com (Other)
[xii] Source: 1930 Census / Bristol, Bristol, Rhode Island; Roll: 2168; Page: 17A – Ancestry.com (Digitizing)
[xiii] Source: Social Security Death Index / Marion Mapes – 039-16-3413 – Ancestry.com (Other)

 

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