The Will of William Price (1762-1846)

It is so nice when other researchers contact me and we can share notes and resources. Recently, a fifth cousin of my wife, and I exchanged several emails bout my wife’s 4th great-grandfather, William Price (1762-1846). I learned that she had transcribed the will of William and was willing to share her efforts.


William Price Will  – Martin County North Carolina Will Book 2/326-328

This will book was filmed in 2 page spreads at Family Search.
p326 (image 383)
p327-328 (image 384)
Marcy Porter’s transcript of the will book image follows:
[Begin transcript]

January Term 1847                                        

State of North Carolina }

Martin County                   } Know all men by these presents that I, William  Price, being in sound mind & memory thanks be to God for the same, but knowing the uncertainty of death do make and ordain this my last Will and Testament as follows

1st  I commit my soul to Almighty God my body to be entered in a desent Christian like manner in the family Grave Yard

2nd The negro Girl Hannah I lent to my Daughter Cherry at her marriage after my death it is my will and desire that said negro Hannahs increase (except one boy by the name of Luke) be Equally divided between the children of my Daughter Cherry and their heirs forever. My Daughter Cherry being dead it is my will wish and desire that the increase of said negro Hannah she being dead also be Equally divided between Robt Rebecca Martha John & Benjamin Lewis Bryan children of said Cherry after my death and to make said division I do nominate and appoint Jno A Turner Robert Bryan and Saml A Long to do the same

3rd  the negro girl Silva I let my Daughter Rebecca have at her marriage (and my Daughter Rebecca being dead and said negro also) but said negro Silva having an increase it is my will and desire that Jno Bryan husband of my said Daughter Rebecca have said negroes to him and his heirs forever

4th  the negro girl Liza I let my Daughter Roxana at her marriage it is my will and desire that my Daughter Roxana have said girl and increase her life time and after her death I give said negroes to her Lawful children

5th  The negro boy Theophilus which was sold and the proffits equally divided between my Daughter Mary and her two children Joseph & Martha remain so forever

6th  I give unto my Grand Daughter Evelina Bryan one negro girl by the name of Hannah should the said Evelina Bryan die without a lawful heir it is my will and desire that the said negro Hannah be sold (and increase if any) and the proceeds arising from said sales be equally divided among my heirs

[Over – Page 327]

7th  I give unto my grand sons Benjamin F Price & Hardy W B Price sons of my son Hardy B Price one Hundred Dollars each before the property which I may have on hand is divided

8th  I give unto my Grand son Joseph R Bryan one tract of land said land I bought of B F and H W B Price containing forty acres more or less and all the improvements thereon forever

9th  It is my will and desire that the negroes I have not given away after my death to be equally divided between my heirs in the following manner (viz) one fifth to Hardy B Price heirs one fifth to Cherry Bryan heirs one fifth to Rebecca Bryan children one fifth to Roxana Bryan her life time and after her death to her children one fifth to Mary Johnson her life time and after her death to her children leaving and giving my executors full power to appoint commissioners to allot and divide said negroes between said heirs according to the above statement

10th  I give unto my Daughter Mary Johnson one tract of Land known as the Johnson Tract containing fifty acres more or less running south with the fence to her and her heirs forever

11th  It is my desire that the balance of the Land I have not otherwise disposed of Except the family Grave Yard be sold and equally divided between my son Hardy B Price heirs and the heirs of Daughters Rebecca Cherry and Roxana in like manner as the negroes  

12th  I give unto my Grand son Joseph R Bryan one bed and furniture

13th  It is my will and desire that my Executors sell at public auction my Perishable Estate and after paying my just debts the balance with what monies or bond I may have to be equally divided between the heirs of my son Hardy B Price and the children of my Daughter Rebecca and the children of my Daughter Cherry and Roxana and Mary in like manner as the negroes

14th  It is my will and desire that my Executors retain in their hands (if not applied for before) the part of my Estate which I give to my Daughter Roxana and her heirs seven years if not applied for in that time then to be Equally divided between my other heirs

15th  It is my will and desire that my Executors retain in their hands the property which I have given unto my Grand children untill they arrive to the age of twenty one or marries.

I do hereby constitute and appoint my friend Archibald Slaton and William R Brown Executors to this my last will and Testament revoking all other wills that I may have made prior to this date. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal, this the twenty second day of August one Thousand Eight Hundred and forty three

 [signed]      William Price (seal)
Signed in presence of us
Bryant Bennett
Jos Waldo
[end transcript]
[Proven January Term 1847 by the oath of Joseph Waldo; William R Brown relinquished his right to qualify, and Archibald Slaton was qualified as sole executor]

I learned of no new family members, but I did learn many new facts regarding the disposition of land to several of the family members. The will also confirms many previously understood facts. For example, Cherry’s children, Lucy, Mary, and James died before 1843 because they weren’t listed in the will.  It also confirms many children and grandchildren were living at the time the will was written.

Endnotes:

This transcription was posted with the specific permission of the transcriber, Marcy Porter.  My thanks go out to her for her willingness to share her excellent work.
If you see anything in the transcription that is incorrect or otherwise should be corrected, please use the comment form below and report it.

Donna One Hundred Years Ago – January 12th to 15th, 1921.

“Donna Montran and Her Bathing Beauties in a Beach Promenade” played at the Majestic Theatre in Paterson, NJ, one hundred years ago this week.

I haven’t discovered where Donna was playing from January 1st through January 11th. However, on January 12th she played at the Majestic Theatre in Paterson, NJ. From The News (Paterson, NJ) 13 January 1921:

MAJESTIC

The News (Paterson, NJ) 13 Jan 1921, Pg. 9

Perhaps there has not been a prettier act staged at the Majestic theater than that of “The Bathing Beauties,” which held forth there yesterday. Perhaps there has not been an act with such a pronounced wealth of color. For “The Bathing Beauties,” ten pretty girls from the sunny climate of California were ushered in with a gorgeous setting that was accentuated by their own charming selves. The richness of the investiture and the more accentuated comeliness of the artists made possible an offering that is practically invincible in the world of variety. Donna Montran leads the procession of beautiful girls that appear in the act and the scene presented in that of a beach where there is all the sunshine and azure blue of the California skies. The attraction will certainly do justice to the feature position of the bill for it cannot be surpassed in point of color and scintillancy. The Bathing Beauties scored a very big success with yesterday’s audience and will assuredly retain that popularity throughout the balance of the week.

Likewise, the Morning Call also had a great article about the Bathing Beauties in their newspaper.

MAJESTIC

“The Bathing Beauties.”

The News (Paterson, NJ) 13 Jan 1921, Page 9

Ten pretty California girls, bringing with them all the beauty and charm of that lovely Western country, will grace the feature position of the current bill at the Majestic theatre in “The Bathing Beauties,” said to be vaudeville’s daintiest act. These comely artists, surrounded by a veritable shower of scenes and electrical effects, making possible one of the most scintillating color schemes ever adopted for a vaudeville act, will offer a production of the most unique type for Paterson playgoers. “The Bathing Beauties” cannot be surpassed in point of pulchritude. And when this beauty is enhanced by an attractive beach setting, marked out in all the rich color and effect of which stagecraft is capable then there is no alternative for playgoers but to be charmed by this most brilliant of variety specialties. “The Bathing Beauties” is one of the most expensive productions ever brought here, but Manager Walsh is not sparing expense when the interest of the patrons is concerned. The act will be a big favorite here.

The Morning Call – 14 Jan 1921

The display ads and the text provide information regarding other acts on the bill.

These include:

  • Sailor Lonra “On the Flexible Pole.”
  • Manning & Lee “After the Matinee.”
  • Jones & Johnson “Darktown’s Brightest Entertainers.” (A blackface routine)
  • Milani Fullardo Four – Comedy, Singing and Music.

As the “Bathing Beauties” were finishing the week, The Morning Call had one more article.

The Morning Call (Paterson, NY) 13 Jan 1921, Page 11

MAJESTIC

“Bathing Beauties.”

“The Bathing Beauties” are the predominant attraction at the Majestic theatre the last part of this week and are scoring a big success. A wealth of color and charm attends the production of this pretty specialty and the audiences have been quick to appreciate the calibre of the act. No other attraction of the present season has achieved as much popularity as this engaging combination of action and pulchritude. “The Bathing Beauties,” led by Donn Montran, have proved one of the best numbers staged here in many weeks.

Majestic Theatre – Paterson, New Jersey

Photo Credit: Paterson History – The Rich History of the City of Paterson, NJ – Photos – Theaters.

This appearance is Donna’s first know showing at The Majestic Theatre in Paterson; however, she played there again in December 1922.

The Majestic Theater opened on 28 November 1910 and was demolished in the 1970s.[i]

In 1921 The Majestic had a seating capacity of 1,200 and showed both vaudeville and pictures. It was part of the Keith Vaudeville Circuit. The stage was 40’ wide, 28’ deep, and 60’ high.[ii]

Besides the Call and the News, there were four other papers. “Chronicle,” “Press,” “Passaic News,” and “Herald.”


Endnotes

[i] “Majestic Theater In Paterson, NJ – Cinema Treasures”. 2020. Cinematreasures.Org. http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/7969.

[ii] The Julius Cahn-Gus Hill theatrical guide and moving v.20 1921 Page 256, New Jersey – Paterson – Majestic Theatre. Hathi Trust – https://hdl.handle.net/2027/coo.31924063709764?urlappend=%3Bseq=300

Don’s Genealogy News – 10 January 2021

Photo Friday

I analyzed five more packets of negatives from the Ethel Wight Studio Collection. See Part 11 – Curtis, Davis (2), Derosier, & Dexter.

    • Mary Derosier (1914-1994)
    • Donald Davis (1907-1972)
    • Four children of Hartley A. & Mary T. Davis of Portland, Maine.
    • Child of Max & Evelyn (Stein) Davis – Photo circa 1936
    • Barbara, Ruth,  & Walter Curtis and Stanley Dexter – c. 1935

Brown Research

Began researching my Blackhurst ancestors. (Montran-Barber-Blackhurst. Learned that my 4th great aunt, Mary Blackhurst immigrated to Deseret (Utah) in 1852. She and her sister, Lydia, both married William Haladay. Can’t tell yet if they were “sister wives” yet or serial wives.  More research underway. I hope to write mini-bios for my 2nd great grandmother, Sarah Blackhurst, siblings.

Howell Research

Received some communications from a cousin of my wife. She transcribed the probate record for my wife’s fifth great grandfather, William Price. It will be interesting to see if the will provides any new information regarding that line — Howell-Hobbs-Long-Bryan-Price. I’ll be posting a “guest blog” about it in the coming days.

Scarborough Historical Society

I posted a great article about early high schools in Scarborough by Linda McLoon.  The first high school was actually two schools, one in Dunstan and one in Oak Hill in 1877. Read all about it in “A High School Comes to Scarborough.”

The Ancestor Hunt has added the Scarborough Historical Society photos to their listing of Maine Free Searchable Photo Collections.  Scarborough images available through Digital Maine were already identified.  There are dozens of links to other record locations in Maine. Check it out!

Conferences

RootsTech – February 25 to 27 – FREE Registration.  https://www.rootstech.org/.

New England Regional Genealogical Conference (NERGC) – Virtual conference – April and May 2021. E-Zine at https://nergc.org/e-zines/

Ethel Wight Collection – Part 11

Davis (3), Derosier, & Dexter

Photo Friday
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.This week for Photo Friday, I look at identifying five more negatives from the Ethel Wight Studio Collection[i]. The names on the envelope are of the individual who paid for the photos, not necessarily of the individual portrayed in the image. As such, I try to analyze the photo and information to positively identify the people in the photographs.[ii]

Mary Derosier (1914-1994)

The envelope this negative was in says, “Miss Mary Derosier – State St Hospital, Portland #743.”

1936, 1937, and 1938 Portland City Directories list Mary H. Derosier, as a student nurse at 62 State, residence 52 do.

The 1930 Census indicates a 15-year-old Mary H. Derosier lived in Berlin, Coos County, New Hampshire. She was born in New York and was the daughter of Peter (age 51) and Elizabeth (age 51) Derosier.

Likewise, the 1936 City Directory for Berlin, New Hampshire indicates Mary H. Derosier, a nurse, living at 800 Second Ave, the same address as Peter D.Derosier.

Further research indicates that Mary married Howard C. Plummer, Jr., on 25 April 1938 in Maine. Mary Helen (Derosier) Plummer died on 3 June 1994.

I was not successful in finding Mary Helen (Derosier) Plummer nor her parents in Family Search. However, I did find her identified in 8 trees on Ancestry.

There were four photos of Mary Helen Derosier in the collection. I have posted all four to my Flickr Photostream. I have posted a photo to Dead Fred.

Donald Davis (1907-1972)

The envelope this negative was in says, “Mr. Donald Davis – 51 Jackson St, Portland #503.”

The 1935 Portland City Directory indicates that Donald W. Davis was a clerk at 585 Congress Street and lived at 51 Jackson.

The 1940 Census shows Donald W. Davis living at 51 Jackson Street with his mother, Flora E. Davis. Donald was 32 and working as a meat cutter.

The 1930 Census shows Donald W. Davis, a 23-year-old musician, living at 51 Jackson Street with his parents James W. and Flora E. Davis.

Family Search finds him to be ID: LYT1-9JG. I added this photo to his Memories section.

Four children of Hartley A. & Mary T. Davis of Portland, Maine.

The envelope this negative was in says, “Mrs. H A Davis – 269 Ray St. Portland # 861.”

The 1938 Portland City Directory lists Hartley A. Davis and his wife Mary T, living at 269 Ray.

The 1940 Census shows Hartley and his wife Mary and their four children, Jacqueline, Robert, Sterling, and Caroline living at 269 Ray Street.

There is no doubt this is them, Robert, Caroline, Jacqueline, and Sterling (left to right).

Sterling has a profile on Family Search, LYBT-G8V. I’ve uploaded the photo there.

Child of Max & Evelyn (Stein) Davis – Photo circa 1936

The envelope this negative was in says, “Mrs. Max Davis – 155 Dartmouth St., Portland.” The negative also says “News” and “Mail Proofs c/o Mrs. Jno Stein, 36 Surfside Rd, Lynn, Mass.”

The 1935 Portland City Directory list Max D. Davis and his wife Evelyn S. living at 84 North, Apartment 2.

The 1936 Portland City Directory lists Max D. Davis living at the Falmouth Hotel. Page 274 of that directory is not in the Ancestry image set, so the location of Evelyn is unknown.

1937, 1938, and 1939 Portland City Directories list Max D. Davis with his wife, Evelyn S. living at 286 State, Apt. 3.

The 1940 Census has Max with his wife and two daughters, Bernice I. and Joseph A., ages 13 and 8 respectively.  Note: although Max is listed at 72 years-old in the 1940 Census, that is in error. He is 32 in the 1930 Census.

Max’s wife’s maiden name was Stein, so sending proofs to her family in Massachusetts makes sense.

The photo appears to be of a boy about 4 or 5 years old. That age fits to be Joseph, assuming he is a boy and not a girl as the 1940 Census suggests.

There is not a profile for Joseph in Family Search. There appear to be 3 family trees on Ancestry which have Max and Evelyn (Stein) Davis.  I will contact each of them and let them know when this posts.

I have also posted the photo of Joseph Davis to my Flickr Photostream. Also, I’ve posted the photo to Dead Fred.

Muriel Loretta (Simmons) Curtis Dexter’s children

Barbara, Ruth,  & Walter Curtis and Stanley Dexter – c. 1935

The envelope this negative was in says, “Mrs. C. S. Dexter – 61 Hampshire St. #1070.”

The 1937 Portland City Directory shows Carroll S. Dexter and his wife Muriel L living at 61 Hampshire.

The 1940 Census shows Carroll Dexter and his wife Marril living in Portland with their five children, Barbara (11), Ruth (9), Walter (8), Stanley (4), and Marchia. Marchia was a baby, only two months old, and wouldn’t have been in the photo. Barbara, Ruth, and Walter are all step-children with the surname of Curtis. Stanley was 4 during the 1940 Census. The baby in the photo appears to be under a year (probably 6 to 8 months).

Carroll Stanley Dexter Jr. was born on 26 May 1935 to Carroll Stanley Dexter and Muriel Loretta Simmons. So, I’m certain the baby in the photo is him. Muriel was married before to Walter Stewart Curtis (1895-1961). She had several children with him including Ruth Pendleton Curtis (1930-2006).

On Family Search, Muriel Loretta Simmons is ID GQNB-VQS

I have posted a second copy of the children to my Flickr account. 

Conclusion

I had:

  • Six identifications where I could post to Family Search.
  • Two identifications where I could contact other researchers.

Final Note

If any of these photos are of a family member, I would love to hear your reaction.

Endnotes

[i] The Wight Studio was in Portland, Maine. Many thanks to Ethel Wight’s family for access to and permission to use the collection of their great aunt.

[ii] These images were converted to positives using a lightbox, a Nikon camera, and computer software.

Don’s Genealogy News – 3 January 2021

Scarborough Historical Society

  • Added book: Grandfather Tales of Scarborough by Augustus Freedom Moulton. Uploaded to  Digital MaineInternet Archive because it came out of copyright on January 1st. (See Blogs Below.)

Greater Portland Chapter of the Maine Genealogical Society

Had a great meeting yesterday, via Zoom, of the Greater Portland Chapter of the Maine Genealogical Society. I was elected Chapter President. Next month (February 6th) we will be doing a three-person panel and will discuss various genealogical techniques and resources. More to come in future weeks.

Don Taylor Genealogy Blog

Other Blogs

The Legal Genealogist has a great article about Welcome to 1925!In it she describes some copyright history and why 1925 books are now out of copyright.

Roberta Estes, in her blog “DNAeXplained” has a great article about Y-DNA — “Y-DNA Resources and Repository.” Not only does she provide general information, but she also provides links to step-by-step actions to using your Y-DNA and a plethora of links to DNA educational articles. If you want to know more about Y-DNA, this is the article to read.

Conferences

I had always wanted to travel to Salt Lake City to attend RootsTech. This year the largest Genealogy is both FREE and it is Online. No excuse for missing this one. I’ve registered and expect to be busy February 25 to 27 with RootsTech.  Be sure to register NOW and get it on your calendar. https://www.rootstech.org/?lang=eng.

New England Regional Genealogical Conference (NERGC) will be virtual this year and will be in April and May 2021. For the latest info, see their E-Zine at https://nergc.org/e-zines/

Family History Fanatics will be having “A Winter of DNA eConference” on 30 January 2021. “Early Bird” price  $19.99 until January 22nd then $24.99. There are four presentations, “DNA & Law Enforcement,” “GEDmatch Basics,” “Tracing Ancestral Lines in the 1700s Using DNA,” and “A Guide to Chromosome Browsers & DNA Segment Data.” This will be followed by a “Genealogy Unscripted” panel discussion. You will be able to replay any of the sessions until Feb 26th. To Register see: https://www.familyhistoryfanatics.com/winterdna

Services

Do you use Google Calendar to manage your activities as I do?  Actually, my calendar is my home page when I open Google. Anyway, if you are interested in Webinars and would like to know what is going on, I highly recommend Genea Webinars. At the bottom of their calendar, there is a “Plus Google Calendar” add-in. Adding it adds Genea Webinars to your Google Calendar. There are typically 2 to 5 webinars available daily (Mon-Fri). Once it is added to your Calendar, you can turn it on or off as you wish. So, I’m looking for something to fulfill my weekly one-hour genealogy education goal, I can easily pick something from the list of presentations to watch.