Donna Darling Collection – Part 68

Four Orpheum Theaters

Treasure Chest Thursday,
By Don Taylor

For this week’s Treasure Chest Tuesday, I’m looking at ten clippings from seven different pages. Nine of them relate to the Orpheum Theaters in various locations. But first, there was a “Donna Darling Review” trade advertisement. It clearly was a clipping from a magazine. It didn’t provide anything about a theater. It gives the title of their show and who the director was.

DONNA DARLING Revue.
With SAMMY CLARK
A Novel Revue in Five Scenes

Entitled

FROM HEAVEN – TO HADES
Singing—Komedy—Dancing

Direction: Lew Holleb
Lew Goldberg Office, Chicago

I think I can use this ad as a graphic for the entire show period.

Racine

Next, there were two clippings of “California Motion Picture Bathing Beauties” featuring Donna Darling. The theater is the “Orpheum-Racine’s Play House Deluxe” and the date is Thanksgiving Day. Thanksgiving was the November 27th in 1924. I had already determined that Donna played at the Racine Orpheum theatre on Nov 27, 28, & 29, so I am able to add the date to these two clippings.

Des Moines

There are three clippings that show another Orpheum theater. They are identified as under “Direction of Alexander Frank.” Alexander Frank provided direction to several theaters in Iowa during the 1920s. One of those theaters was in Des Moines. I had already established that Donna played the Des Moines Orpheum on January 2nd to the 5th, 1927; so, I’m sure this show is the show the clippings are related to.

Tulsa & Oklahoma City

The last three items include an Orpheum Theater Program. There is no date nor location with it. However, another clipping shows the Orpheum theater with the same acts also on the bill and had hand-written on it “Tulsa Okla.” Also, is a short ad showing the Donna Darling Revue “this W’k, Orpheum, Tulsa & Oklahoma City, Okla.”

Donna played the Orpheum Theater in Oklahoma City on December 9, 1923 and the Orpheum in Tulsa on December 13-14, 1923. At first I thought this venue must have been one of these two. Further research on line found acts different from the ones in the clippings played on those dates. Finally, a search for “Sie Tehar Troup” found they played in Oklahoma City with the “Darling Revue” starting Thursday, 12 August 1926. It is possible the same group played in Tulsa sometime in August 1926, however, I have not been able to find any papers for that time period and location, yet.

Conclusion

November 27-29, 1924 – Racine, Wisconsin – Orpheum – Bathing Beauties with Donna Darling. Newspapers.com – DDC-68

January 2-5, 1927 – Des Moines, IA – Orpheum – Donna Darling Revue – Newspapers.com – Archives.Com – DCC-68 

Two New Venues Discovered:

August 12, 1926 – Oklahoma City, OK – Orpheum Theater. Newspapers.com

August ??, 1926 – Tulsa, OK – Orpheum – Darling Revue – DDC-68

Hiram Vincent in the News

In the News
Howell, Vincent (Vinson)
By Don Taylor

“In the News” is my reporting of newly discovered newspaper articles regarding the ancestors I am researching. The information found in newspapers often raises more questions and more research areas, but invariably suggests new avenues for research plus providing texture to the life of an ancestor.

Hiram Vincent Appointed Guardian

Hiram Vincent is my wife’s 3rd great-uncle. He is the son Berkett Vincent (c. 1776 – c. 1845) and the brother of  John Vincent (1817-bef. 1870), my wife’s 2nd great-grandfather. This set of four articles show Hiram being appointed and maintaining his guardianship for two of his sons.

Article

newspapers.comFrom the Bolivar Bulletin (Bolivar, TN) dated Friday, 6 March 1874.

“Synopsis County Court, March Term | 1874.”
Guardians Appointed.

Hiram Vinson Guardian of his children.

It seems strange to me that Hiram would be granted guardianship of HIS children. I wonder if it was a legal thing or if there is more to the story. Certainly, the County Court Records should talk about what may have occurred.


Two years later, the following ran in:

The Bolivar Bulletin (Bolivar, TN) dated Thursday, 13 April 1876.

Guardians Appointed.

Hiram Vinson for J H and T A Vinson.

“J H Vinson” and “T A Vinson” must be Hiram’s two sons, Joseph Hiram Vincent and Thomas Anthony Vincent. In 1876, Joseph, the older of the two, would have been 15 years old and Thomas, 13. Yes, they are minor children, but I would not expect that a formal guardianship by their father would be required. There must be something else causing this. Court records should tell the story.


Two years after that, the following ran in:

The Bolivar Bulletin (Bolivar, TN) dated Thursday, 11 April 1878.

County Court
Synopsis of Proceedings April Term 1878

Hiram Vinson renewed his bond as guardian of his children.


Finally, two years later the following ran:

The Bolivar Bulletin (Bolivar, TN) dated Thursday, 15 April 1880.

Venire July Circuit Court

Hiram Vincent renewed bond as guardian J H and T A Vincent.

Once again, the articles highlight that the surname Vinson and Vincent are used interchangeably. As a note, I use Vincent when speaking of the family line and use Vincent when talking about an individual. I use Vinson when a particular document uses the name. In 1880, the two boys would have been 19 and 17 respectively.

Follow-up:

Determine why Hiram needed to be granted guardianship of his children in 1874. (Get copies of the court documents.)


Endnotes

All “In the New” entries used in this posting came from Newspapers.Com, their Tennessee Newspapers collection.

William Hiram Vincent & the Early Censuses

Howell-Vincent Line
Census Sunday
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.My wife’s third great-grandfather, Burkett Vincent, may have had 12 children, or he may have had eight.  He apparently had two wives, Elizabeth Rose and an unknown first wife. To attempt to understand the Vincent family of Halifax, North Carolina, I thought I’d look closer at the children of Burkett (and Elizabeth).

Known Children of Burkett & Elizabeth Vincent

    • William Hiram Vincent
    • John Vincent
    • James Vincent
    • Elisha Vincent
    • Susan Vincent
    • Nancy Vincent
    • Burkett Vincent

There were also two boys and two girls who were born between 1810 and 1820.  It is unclear if these are William, John, Elisha, and a heretofore unknown girl.  There was also another girl born between 1804 and 1820 that is presumed to be Burkett’s oldest daughter.

I’ll take a look at each of the children, in turn, starting with:

William Hiram Vincent (1814-1893)

1890 Census (Not Available) 

Hardeman County Courthouse in Bolivar
Hardeman County Courthouse – Photo By RealElectrical, CC BY-SA 3.0

1880 Census[i] – Hiram Vinson was a farmer living with three of his children in District 9, Hardeman County, Tennessee. With him are his daughter, Francis, and two sons, Joe and Tom.

1870 Census[ii] – Hiram Vincent was a farmer living with seven implied children.  The oldest one and the youngest two were his children according to the 1880 Census, so I’m confident ascribing the other four children as his. This adds, James J., William, McAllister, and Martha to his list of children. It also provides a first name for his daughter Mary Frances, and middle initials for Joseph and Thomas. All the children were born in Tennessee, so I’d expect to find the family in Tennessee during the 1860 Census. 

1860 Census[iii] – Hiram Vintson [sic] and his wife Catherine are living in Hardeman, Tennessee, with their children, Mary, James, William, Elisha, and Martha. Elisha wasn’t enumerated in the 1870 Census, so he is assumed to have died between 1860 and 1870. Mary and James attended school. All were enumerated as having been born in North Carolina, although later censuses all suggest they were born in Tennessee. 

1850 Census[iv] – Hirum Vincin [sic] and his wife Catherine are living in Hardeman, Tennessee with their daughter, Mary. Hirum and Catherine had been married within the past year. Hirum is listed as “Overseer” for an occupation. Of Interest, Hirum is listed as 32 years old, suggesting birth between 1827 and 1828, where other census records suggest he was born between 1825 and 1826. 

1840 Census – In my initial review of Burkett Vinson, I ascribed the male, 20 to 29 years old, as presumed to be John Vinson. Upon further research, I have learned that John had two brothers also born between 1810 to 1820, Hiram and James. The male, 20 to 29 years old in the household of Burkett Vinson could easily have been any of the three. A look through the other Vinson’s in Halifax County yielded four results. Only Burkett and Robert had households that included a 20 to 29-year-old male. Further, Paul Vincent of Hardeman County, Tennessee was the only household with a 20 to 29-year-old. So, Hiram could have been the young man in the household. Alternately, Hiram could be elsewhere, or he could have been missed completely.

1830 Census – In my review of Burkett Vincent, it appeared that the teenager, age 15 to 20, in the household of Burkett Vincent is Hiram (William Hiram Vincent).

1820 Census – In my review of Burkett Vincent, it appeared that one of the children, a male under 10, in the household of Burkett Vincent is Hiram (William Hiram Vincent). 

Conclusion

William Hiram Vincent is in the FamilySearch tree as ID LHCZ-XB8. Census records before 1850 do not appear to clearly identify William Hiram Vincent as being enumerated. No new information regarding his parents was discovered.


Endnotes:

[i] 1880 Census, Family Search, 1880 Census – [William] Hiram Vinson – District 9, Hardeman, Tennessee. “United States Census, 1880,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MD7D-QFM : 15 July 2017), Tom Vinson in household of Hiram Vinson, District 9, Hardeman, Tennessee, United States; citing enumeration district ED 58, sheet 474A, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), FHL microfilm 1,255,260.

[ii] 1870 Census (FS), Family Search, 1870 Census – Hiram Vincent – Bolivar, Hardeman, Tennessee. “United States Census, 1870”,
 database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M VD7 : 14 June 2019), Hiram Vincent,
1870.  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MDD3-VD7?from=lynx1UIV8&treeref=LHCZ-XB8.

[iii] 1860 Census, Family Search, 1860 Census – [William] Hiram Vintson [Vincent] – 7th District, Hardeman, Tennessee. “United States Census, 1860”, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M8TD-4ZK : 18 March 2020), Martha A Vintson in an entry for Hiram Vintson, 1860.

[iv] 1850 Census (NARA), 1850 Census – Hirum Vincin – Hardeman, Tennessee. “United States Census, 1850,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCDF-P2G : 4 April 2020), Mary Vincin in household of Hirum Vincin, Hardeman county, Hardeman, Tennessee, United States; citing family 676, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

Donna Darling Collection – Part 67

Treasure Chest Thursday
By Don Taylor

Two Temple Theaters

For this week’s Treasure Chest Tuesday, I’m looking at two clippings from the Donna Darling Collection that relate to two  Temple Theaters.

The good news is that I encountered Temple Theaters previously.

Back in Donna Darling Collection – Part 39, I learned that Donna had played at the Temple Theater in Brantford, Ontario from January 27 to January 29, 1927.

Back in Donna Darling Collection – Part 63, I learned that Donna & Sammy played at a Temple Theater at the same time as Richard Talmadge’s movie “The Wall Street Wiz” sometime in May 1926 or later.

The first of the two clippings suggested that Donna and Sammy were at the Temple theater in “Braneford, Ont.”  After a closer look, it appeared the “e” was actually a “t” and the location was Brantford, Ontario. The advertisement shows the movie “The Only Way” with Sir. John Martin Harvey was playing.

The second image is unlabeled. It indicates that:

Temple Presents Act by California Bathing Girls

The Temple presents a pleasing bill for the last half of this week headed by the well-known singer and bathing beauty, Donna Montran, assisted by 10 of California’s selected peaches, in a most unusual offering of song and dance, entitled “A Beach Promenade.” A pretentious dancing revue is offered by the Homer Girls and Pease. Their revue is splendidly produced with special scenery and costumes and original music. It consists of dancing, both old and new…..

Other shows on the bill include:

  • Jess and Dell as “The Human Puppets”
  • Fred and Tommy Haden, “The American Englishmen”
  • Miss Leila Shaw in “There She Goes Again
  • Jay Raymond – “Soap Box Orator” (Possibly – unclear if he is an act or is only being referred to.

Donna began her “California Bathing Girls” in July 1920 and ended it in May 1921. So, this clipping comes from that period.

During that time, her show venues were in six Mid-Atlantic states, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Washington DC. There are 14 theaters in New York alone. Hopefully, a newspaper article will come up showing Donna at a Temple Theater with the same side acts.

Conclusion

I added a date of 1927-01-27 to the image of the Brantford, Ont., clipping and file.

I added “Before May 1921 and after July 1920 – Temple Theatre, unknown location. (See DDC-67)” to her career calendar.

Samuel Swann – Disbursement of Estate – 11 Dec 1809

Amanuensis[i] Monday
Darling, Swayzee, Walker, Swann Line

By Don Taylor

The disbursement of the Samuel Swan Estate confirmed names and relationships and reminded me that sometimes ledgers are sometimes wrong.

Maryland Register of Wills Records, 1629-1999 – St. Mary’s – Distributions 1782-1829, Page 320.

Transcription

Saint Mary’s County, test. the 11th day of December 1809

The account of Samuel Swann, late of Saint Mary’s County, deceased, by Thomas M. Swann Executor

Estate accounted for £ 914, 11, 11½
Payments & Disbursements allowed      88,   6, 10½
Balance due and Distributable    826, 11, 11½
Distribution as follows to wit £ 914, 11, 11½
To the children of Samuel H Swann, namely Henry, Philip, Ann, Catharine D and Margaret C Swann negro Ben £112.10.0 & 1/8 of other property £33.13. 5-3/8.  

146.3.5-3/8

To the children of Edward B Swann,

To John Samuel Swan negro Charles £56.5.0

Also one third and 1/8 part of sundry property 11.4.5-5/8

To Elkanah Swann Negro Elick   33.15.0

Also one third and 1/8 part of sundry property 11.4.5-5/8

To Elick D Swann negro Jeremiah  18.15.0

Also one third and 1/8 part of sundry property 11.4.5-5/8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

142/8/5-3/8

 

Maryland Register of Wills Records, 1629-1999 – St. Mary’s – Distributions 1782-1829, Page 321.
To the deceased’s son John Swann negro Rose £75 Negro Vincent £33.15.0 negro Janet £18.15.0 one horse colt £15, and one bed and furniture £5.12.6  

148.2.6

To the deceased’s daughter Anna Garner one eighth part of sundry property. 33.13.5-3/8
To the deceased’s daughter Margaret Walter one eighth part of sundry property. 33.13.5-3/8
To the deceased’s granddaughter Lydia D Swann negro Mary £93.15.0 £93.15.0
To the deceased grandchildren Anna Maddox and John D Swann one eighth part of sundry property.  

33.13.5-3/8

To the deceased’s son Thomas M Swann one eighth part of sundry property 33.13.5-3/8
To the same or such of the deceased’s children as the three following negroes may chose to remain with to wit Hephaniah £9.7.6 Phillis £9.7.6 and Jane £37.10.0  

56.5.0

To the deceased’s grand daughter Catharine D Swann negro Charity 37.10.0

also one eighth of sundry property. 33.13.5-3/8

 

71.3.5-3/8

£ 826.5.1

Test, James Forrest Reg’r wills
For St. Mary’s County —


Findings

One eighth was disbursed to seven individuals,

  1. Children of Samuel
  2. Children of Edward Burch
  3. Anna
  4. Margaret
  5. Children of Henry
  6. Child of Philip
  7. Thomas


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The disbursement document was missing a line regarding Elizabeth who was mentioned in the will. I suspect her not being mention was an oversight, apparently by the Register of Wills. The sum of the individual amounts disbursed do not total the bottom-line total and is off by about £33, which is a one-eighth share. So, I think when he transcribed the original document into his ledger he missed a line.

I find it interesting that John, the one child that didn’t receive a share of the sundry property did receive the greatest value of materials, He received a colt, bed, furniture, and three enslaved people.

Samuel required Thomas to give consent to John’s selling or disposing of any of the property which suggests to me that John was mentally challenged,

Citation

“Maryland Register of Wills Records, 1629-1999,” images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GYMC-9G6: Accessed 20 May 2014), St. Mary’s > Distributions 1782-1829 > image 173 of 250; Hall of Records, Annapolis.

ENDNOTES

[i] John Newmark started the “Amanuensis Monday” category in 2009 on his Blog,  Transylvanian Dutch  and many bloggers have followed suit using the tag. Google provides the following meaning for amanuensis: “A literary or artistic assistant, in particular one who takes dictation or copies manuscripts.”