The Will of William Price (1762-1846)

It is so nice when other researchers contact me and we can share notes and resources. Recently, a fifth cousin of my wife, and I exchanged several emails bout my wife’s 4th great-grandfather, William Price (1762-1846). I learned that she had transcribed the will of William and was willing to share her efforts.


William Price Will  – Martin County North Carolina Will Book 2/326-328

This will book was filmed in 2 page spreads at Family Search.
p326 (image 383)
p327-328 (image 384)
Marcy Porter’s transcript of the will book image follows:
[Begin transcript]

January Term 1847                                        

State of North Carolina }

Martin County                   } Know all men by these presents that I, William  Price, being in sound mind & memory thanks be to God for the same, but knowing the uncertainty of death do make and ordain this my last Will and Testament as follows

1st  I commit my soul to Almighty God my body to be entered in a desent Christian like manner in the family Grave Yard

2nd The negro Girl Hannah I lent to my Daughter Cherry at her marriage after my death it is my will and desire that said negro Hannahs increase (except one boy by the name of Luke) be Equally divided between the children of my Daughter Cherry and their heirs forever. My Daughter Cherry being dead it is my will wish and desire that the increase of said negro Hannah she being dead also be Equally divided between Robt Rebecca Martha John & Benjamin Lewis Bryan children of said Cherry after my death and to make said division I do nominate and appoint Jno A Turner Robert Bryan and Saml A Long to do the same

3rd  the negro girl Silva I let my Daughter Rebecca have at her marriage (and my Daughter Rebecca being dead and said negro also) but said negro Silva having an increase it is my will and desire that Jno Bryan husband of my said Daughter Rebecca have said negroes to him and his heirs forever

4th  the negro girl Liza I let my Daughter Roxana at her marriage it is my will and desire that my Daughter Roxana have said girl and increase her life time and after her death I give said negroes to her Lawful children

5th  The negro boy Theophilus which was sold and the proffits equally divided between my Daughter Mary and her two children Joseph & Martha remain so forever

6th  I give unto my Grand Daughter Evelina Bryan one negro girl by the name of Hannah should the said Evelina Bryan die without a lawful heir it is my will and desire that the said negro Hannah be sold (and increase if any) and the proceeds arising from said sales be equally divided among my heirs

[Over – Page 327]

7th  I give unto my grand sons Benjamin F Price & Hardy W B Price sons of my son Hardy B Price one Hundred Dollars each before the property which I may have on hand is divided

8th  I give unto my Grand son Joseph R Bryan one tract of land said land I bought of B F and H W B Price containing forty acres more or less and all the improvements thereon forever

9th  It is my will and desire that the negroes I have not given away after my death to be equally divided between my heirs in the following manner (viz) one fifth to Hardy B Price heirs one fifth to Cherry Bryan heirs one fifth to Rebecca Bryan children one fifth to Roxana Bryan her life time and after her death to her children one fifth to Mary Johnson her life time and after her death to her children leaving and giving my executors full power to appoint commissioners to allot and divide said negroes between said heirs according to the above statement

10th  I give unto my Daughter Mary Johnson one tract of Land known as the Johnson Tract containing fifty acres more or less running south with the fence to her and her heirs forever

11th  It is my desire that the balance of the Land I have not otherwise disposed of Except the family Grave Yard be sold and equally divided between my son Hardy B Price heirs and the heirs of Daughters Rebecca Cherry and Roxana in like manner as the negroes  

12th  I give unto my Grand son Joseph R Bryan one bed and furniture

13th  It is my will and desire that my Executors sell at public auction my Perishable Estate and after paying my just debts the balance with what monies or bond I may have to be equally divided between the heirs of my son Hardy B Price and the children of my Daughter Rebecca and the children of my Daughter Cherry and Roxana and Mary in like manner as the negroes

14th  It is my will and desire that my Executors retain in their hands (if not applied for before) the part of my Estate which I give to my Daughter Roxana and her heirs seven years if not applied for in that time then to be Equally divided between my other heirs

15th  It is my will and desire that my Executors retain in their hands the property which I have given unto my Grand children untill they arrive to the age of twenty one or marries.

I do hereby constitute and appoint my friend Archibald Slaton and William R Brown Executors to this my last will and Testament revoking all other wills that I may have made prior to this date. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal, this the twenty second day of August one Thousand Eight Hundred and forty three

 [signed]      William Price (seal)
Signed in presence of us
Bryant Bennett
Jos Waldo
[end transcript]
[Proven January Term 1847 by the oath of Joseph Waldo; William R Brown relinquished his right to qualify, and Archibald Slaton was qualified as sole executor]

I learned of no new family members, but I did learn many new facts regarding the disposition of land to several of the family members. The will also confirms many previously understood facts. For example, Cherry’s children, Lucy, Mary, and James died before 1843 because they weren’t listed in the will.  It also confirms many children and grandchildren were living at the time the will was written.

Endnotes:

This transcription was posted with the specific permission of the transcriber, Marcy Porter.  My thanks go out to her for her willingness to share her excellent work.
If you see anything in the transcription that is incorrect or otherwise should be corrected, please use the comment form below and report it.

Mary-Alice’s ThruLines – Part 2

DNA
ThruLines Thursday
Howell-Hobbs

This week I took a look at some of my wife’s Ancestry DNA matches and some of her ThruLinestm results.

DNA Matches

There were no new matches in her 2nd cousins and closer, so I started looking at her third cousins.

The first three were 3rd to 4th cousin.

Individual cM shared on x Segments Line Comments
3C = 3rd Cousin
D. L. 196 cM 11 Seg Hobbs 3C – Samuel Aquilla & Martha Ann (Bryan) Long.
C. C. 179 cM 8 Seg (Howell?) No Tree – I’m awaiting response to contact email. 
J-7 166 cM 9 Seg Hobbs No Tree – I’m awaiting response to contact email.

ThruLinestm

No new connections on her grandparents.

For her great-grandparents, there were 2 matches for her Howell/Vinson line and 3 for her Hobbs/Long line. There were no new individuals on her Darling, McAllister, Huber, or Trümpi lines.

Howell Line

Both of the individuals connect via Grandpa Howell’s sister Anna Lee Howell. One indicates that he is descended from William J. Boseman and the other indicates he is descended from Virginia L. Roseman.  My records indicate that Anna Lee married William Boseman in 1886 and had three children with the Boseman surname, Maggie, William, and Jesse. After that, my records show that she had five children with the surname Roseman. I’m not showing that Anna had a second marriage or showing any other reason for the surname change.

That lets me know I need to look more closely at Anna Lee Howell and her life and her children. Also, I’ll look more closely at William Jackson Boseman (1888-1962) and Virginia L Roseman (1905-___) and see if I can untangle the surname.

Hobbs Line

There were three ThruLinestm matches along the Hobbs line. All three were through great-aunt Annie Hobbs (1872-1953) who married Frank Alton Armstrong, Sr in 1890. They had three children, their oldest, Hazel G Armstrong (1895-1997). Hazel married Itimous Thaddus Valentine (1887-1970) and had five children that I am aware of. One of those children (possibly living) had at least four children, two of whom tested and were already in my (private) tree. The third person matching is J.H. a great-grandchild of Hazel through one of the other children (possibly living). I didn’t have him in my tree, but I did have his mother in my private tree, so I’m confident enough in his relationship to add him to my tree.

DNA Relationship

ThruLinestm indicates that both are second cousins twice removed. DNA Painter’s Shared cM Project 3.0 tool v4 indicates that 2C2R should share between 0 and 261 cM of DNA with an average being 74cM. The ThruLines match “RC” and my wife share 52 cM and the second match shares 60 cM; so the proposed relationship fits the amount of DNA shared.

Conclusion

Genetic matches and TrueLines confirmed several people in my tree. It let me know that I need to further research three ancestors on a secondary line, and it allowed me to confidently add one new cousin.

Final Comment

If you are a descendant of Peter Fletcher Howell (1842-1924), I’d love to learn how you and my wife are related. Testing with Ancestry DNA is an excellent way for us to confirm our relationship and possibly you broaden your tree as well.

My other ThruLines posts are listed under the ThruLines Thursday category.

Disclaimer

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Hobbs – Surname Saturday

Name Origin

Hob is a “pet form of Robert” and Hobbs is a patronymic form for Son of Hob, as is Hobson.

Geographical

Worldwide there are approximately 99,273 people who bear the Hobbs surname. The vast majority, over 62,000 in the United States, with England and Australia being distant second and third (about 18,000 and 8,000 respectively). Interestingly, in terms of frequency, the little country of Vanuatu has the greatest proportion of the Hobbs surname, where one in 1,644 people have the surname.

Direct Hobbs Ancestors

5.  Mary Lillian Hobbs Howell (1885-1964) LVSF-NCZ
10.  James Ashley Hobbs (1843-1920) – Family Search: M4G8-BZX
20.  George W Hobbs (1805 – 1858) – Family Search: G3WN-FZC

Historical

1920

During the 1920 Census, my wife’s great-grandfather, James Ashley Hobbs was living in Williamston, Martin County, North Carolina. There were 303 Hobbs families in North Carolina during the 1920 Census, but James was the only Hobbs that lived in Martin County. The 75-year-old widower boarded in the household of James R. Hanell. James died later, in November, that year.

1880

According to an Ancestry search, there were 829 people with the Hobbs surname enumerated in North Carolina and one family in Martin County. That family was my wife’s great-grandfather, James Ashley Hobbs, his wife Delora, two sons, Roland and Charles, and two daughters, Annie and Emily. My wife’s grandmother, Mary Lillian Hobbs, was born in 1884. And her 2nd great-grandfather, George passed in 1859.

1840

According to Ancestry, there were 58 Hobbs families in North Carolina. My wife’s 2nd great-grandfather, George W Hobbs, and his wife Mary were married and were raising three children in Beaufort County. They were the only Hobbs family there during the 1840 Census.

Known Hobbs relatives.

My records have identified 145 direct-line descendants of George W. Hobbs (1801-1859) and 23 known Hobbs descendants.

Sources:

 

 

Long – Surname Saturday

Long – Surname Saturday

Howell-Hobbs-Long

Long Surname Meaning

The European surname Long is a descriptive term regarding the stature of the original bearer of the name.[i] Think of it in terms of a “long tall” individual. The Chinese surname “Long” derives from the name “Yu-Long” meaning “resistor of dragons.” Finally, there is a Cambodian variant of the name which is unexplained.[ii]

Geographical

Worldwide there are approximately 516,166 people who bear the Long surname.

It is most prevalent in the United State where over half of the people with the Long surname live. Interestingly enough, Cambodia has the greatest frequency of the name where it is the 19th most prevalent name in the country.

In the United States, the greatest incidence is in California. North Carolina is 4th in incidence (people with the surname) and number one in frequency where 1 in 666 people have the surname.[iii]

Earliest Long Ancestors

Annie Deborah Long was born in Martin County, North Carolina in 1846 and died in Martin County, North Carolina in 1913.

Her father, Samuel Aquilla Long, was also born and died in North Carolina.

I don’t know where Samuel’s father, John Long, or his father’s father, Aquilla Long, were born or where they died.

In 1920 there were 1272 people with the Long surname in North Carolina. Twenty-one of those people are known descendants of Aquilla Long. I haven’t had a chance to research John Long or his father, Aquilla Long yet. I expect many more Long relatives to be found when I do that.

Direct Long Ancestors

Known relatives.

My records have 187 descendants of Aquilla Long identified; 21 of them have the Long surname.

Sources:

Endnotes:

[i] Internet: Forebears – Surname Search Results for “Long” on 30 January 2019. See: https://forebears.io/surnames/long

[ii] Internet: Ancestry – Name Origins – “Long Family History” accessed 30 Jan 2019. See: https://www.ancestry.com/name-origin?surname=Long

[iii] See Endnote #1 above – Forebears.

The Longs of Martin County – Part 3 of 3 – Findings

Howell-Hobbs-Long

After reviewing the 1850 and 1840 Census records for Martin County, North Carolina, I developed a hypothesis that Samuel Aquilla Long is the son of Stephen Long. The Stephen Long household did not exist in Martin County in 1850 but in 1840 consisted of the following:

MALES

  • 10-15   2        Two Unknown Males born 1825-1830.
  • 15-20   1        Unknown Male born 1820-1825
  • 20-30   1        Unknown Male born 1810-1820 (Could be Samuel Aquilla Long)
  • 30-40   1        Unknown Male born 1800-1810
  • 40-50   1        Assumed to be Stephen Long

FEMALES

  • 20-30    1      Unknown Female born 1820-1830.
  • 50-60    1      Apparently Stephen’s wife.

Shipwreck of the Comet.

I then began searching for documents or records that would fit this family in various sources. Immediately, I found a series of articles on Newspapers.Com. According to the articles, Stephen Long owned the schooner, Comet. The Comet had left Turks Island fully loaded with salt and wrecked at North Point of Breakers, near Ocracoke Island. Two of Stephen Long’s sons died in the ship’s sinking along with the Captain. The tragedy of the loss was compounded when the distraught widow of the Captain committed suicide by drowning herself and her two small children.[i]

Wilmington Journal – January 30, 1846

As for Stephen Long’s sons, one article described the two as “promising, interesting youths, in the very morning of Manhood, the pride and hope of their heart-stricken, unfortunate parent.” The two youngest males in the 1840 census would have been between 16 and 21 in 1846. To me, that sounds much like “the very morning of manhood. I searched many places to find their names and have been unsuccessful in finding them. Because they died so young and there was no mention of them having children, I am identifying them simply as:

FNU son of Stephen Long born after 1825 and before 1830; died 6 Jan 1846.

That still leaves three males in the household where one of them could be my wife’s 2nd great-grandfather, Samuel Aquilla Long.

Court Case for Stephen Long

Next, I found an appeal to the North Carolina Supreme Court on Google Books.[ii] The appeal mentions that Stephen Long sued William L. Mizell. Before the case came to the Martin County Superior Court, in June 1849, Stephen Long died. The judge postponed the case until the next session of the court, August 1849. For this session, Edgar A. Long, the executor of Stephen’s estate, was the new petitioner. After the case was heard and decided but before any execution orders were issued, Edgar A. Long died. Who was going to receive the money owed was to be determined by the State Supreme Court in 1851.

It is often the case that the eldest son is the executor of a person’s estate, so I penciled in Edgar A. Long as the oldest son of Stephen Long.

Unknown Male born 1800-1810 – Possibly Edgar A. Long who died in 1849.

The Will of Stephen Long

Now knowing there was an executor for Stephen Long’s estate, I began looking for probate or will for Stephen.

I was able to find a will for Stephen at Ancestry.Com in “North Carolina, Wills and Probate Records, 1665-1998.”[iii]

The will was quite straight forward. My transcription:

Will of Stephen Long

In the name of God Amen! I Stephen Long of the town of Williamston, Martin County being of sound disposing mind and memory do make, ordain and publish this my last will and testament.

1st I desire that all my just debt be paid.

2[nd] I give to my all loved wife, Frerella [Avrella??] Long all my land, negros, and property both real and personal during her natural life.

3rd after my wife death I give and bequeath all my land, negros, and real and personal property to my three sons, Adolphus, Pierce, and John equally to be divided between them.

4th I nominate constitute and appoint my son Adolphus, Long, sole Executor to this my last will and testament in testimony I have documents set my hand and seal the 11th day of August 1843 on the presence of

Wm Woodard
L Whittlesey

Stephen Long (seal)

Conclusion

I’ve learned that Stephen’s three living (in 1843) sons were Adolphus, Pierce, and John. I also learned that Samuel Aquilla Long was not one of  Stephen’s sons. So, it is back to the drawing board.  I didn’t see any other reasonable candidates other than this in the 1840 Census. I know that the 23-year-old Samuel Aquilla Long could have been living anywhere during the 1840 Census, but I’m hoping he was probably living with his parents during the 1830 Census. When I next return to researching this line, I’ll look at the 1830 Census and see what possibilities are there.


Endnotes

[i] Wilmington Journal (Wilmington, NC) – Jan 30, 1846, “Distressing Shipwreck” via Newspapers.com

[ii] Google Books:  North Carolina Reports, Vol. 34 — Cases Argued and Determined in the SUPREME COURT of North Carolina — June Term, 1851 to August Term, 1851 both inclusive by  James Iredell (Volume 12) — Annotated by Walter Clark (2nd anno. Ed.) — Reprinted for the state by E. M. UZZELL & C0. Presses of Mitchel Printing Company, Raleigh, N. C. 1917. https://books.google.com/books?id=19ozAQAAMAAJ.

[iii] North Carolina, Wills and Probate Records, 1665-1998 – Ancestry.com 2