Ancestor Sketch – Elizabeth Rose (?)

Howell-Vincent/Vinson-Rose
By Don Taylor

I used to, mistakenly, say that there are no real “Brick Walls.” Typically, a “Brick wall” is just a difficult record to find or a record that isn’t worth paying someone else to find for you.  In the case of Elizabeth, who married Burkett Vincent and had several children with him, including my wife’s 2nd great grandfather, John Vincent, there just might be a true brick wall. I have a couple more really involved actions to try but I’m not holding my breath thinking it will solve my dilemma.

Howell/Darling – Ancestor #37

List of Grandparents

  • Grandfather: 4.  James Dallas Howell (1879-1964)
  • 1st Great-grandmother: 9.   Susan R. Vinson Howell (1848-1910)
  • 2nd Great-grandfather: 18.  John Vincent (1817-bef. 1870)
  • 3rd Great-grandmother: 37.  Elizabeth Rose ? (1785 – 186?)

Elizabeth Rose (1785-186?)

Birth

I am yet to find a source for Elizabeth’s parents.  I took a look at Ancestry Trees and found the following parents indicated:

  • Forty-seven (47) trees suggest William Rose (1759-1801) and Sarah Crawley (1775-1863).
  • Fourteen (14) trees propose Elisha Rose Sr. (1753-1795) and Hannah Sellers (1758-1812).
  • Two trees indicate Elisha Rose and Pheroby Powell (died 1794).

I have not found any sources proving her parents identities. All suggest other people’s trees as their source.

It appears that Elizabeth’s husband, Burkett Vincent. Died before the 1850 Census as Elizabeth is enumerated as the head of a household consisting of her and one daughter, Nancy. Also, during the 1850 Census her son John is living next door.

Looking at censuses before 1850, Elizabeth would have been a female in the household of her husband, Burkett.

The Burket Vinson household of the 1840 Census included a female age 50 to 59 which is presumed to be Elizabeth. Additionally, there are males and females enumerated that align with Burkett (Jr.), John, and Nancy in the household.

The 1830 Census throws the monkey wrench into the works.  None of the children of Burkett and Elizabeth are enumerated. Rather four different boys and three different girls are enumerated. All older. I suppose it is possible they were entered on the wrong columns, but I don’t know. My suspicion is that Burkett had a first wife and children with her. The children were still with him, and another female, possibly a sister of Burkett, was in the household.

This idea carries on even stronger into the 1820 census. There, living in Burkett’s household is a female over 45. Elizabeth would have been 35 in 1820. So, I don’t believe it is Elizabeth with Burkett in either the 1820 or 1830 censuses. A scenario wherein Burkett was married, his wife died, he remarried Elizabeth. Elizabeth appears to have had children from a previous marriage, who then took on the Vincent surname.

Of course, this is all speculation, but it does provide a plausible explanation for the conflicting Census Records.

What I think I know

  • 1785 – Elizabeth was born – Parents unclear.
  • 1835 – Elizabeth Rose possibly married Burkett Vincent sometime between 1830 and 1840.
  • 1840 – Elizabeth is probably the female 50-59 in the household of Burkett Vincent
  • 1850 – Elizabeth is the 64-year-old head of a household consisting of her and her 25-year-old daughter, Nancy.
  • 1860 – Elizabeth is the 75-year-old woman in the household of her son, John, his wife Ellenor, and their six children.
  • I believe that Elizabeth died sometime before 1870.

Further Actions / Follow-up

  • Query private tree owners for birth source information.
  • Detail the lives of each of the children of Burkett Vincent and Elizabeth Rose.
  • Detail the lives of the probable siblings of Elizabeth Rose.

————–  Disclaimer  ————–

Continue reading “Ancestor Sketch – Elizabeth Rose (?)”

Anna (Howell) Boseman & the 1910 Census

Census Sunday
By Don Taylor

Introduction

Sometimes, while researching through the census records, some realization occurs that makes you smile and say, “oh wow!” Such was the case while I was researching my wife’s great-aunt Anna Lee (Howell) Boseman. During the 1910 census, just like during the 1900 census, women reported how many children they had and how many were still living. In Anna’s case she had 13 children and nine were living. All nine were identified as living with her and her husband, so that means any child born before 1910 and not listed must have died before the census.

1910 Census showing the number of Children for Anna (Howell) Boseman

The Living with William and Anna during the 1910 Census are the following children:

  • William Boseman Jr.      21
  • Jessie Boseman            17
  • Bernice S Boseman       15
  • Mollie M Boseman          13
  • George D Boseman       12
  • Russell L Boseman          8
  • Virginia L Boseman          5
  • Lilie M Boseman              3
  • Martin V Boseman            0

Maggie who was with the family in 1900 is missing in 1910, so Maggie must have died before 1910. The other five children are in both censuses:

  • Anna Lee Howell was born in November 1866
  • She Married William Jackson Boseman in 1886
  • They had 13 children, nine of them were living in 1910; eight of them lived to adulthood.
  • She died in her residence, at the ripe old age of 84, on 31 July 1951 in Weldon, Halifax County, North Carolina and is buried at Cedarwood Cemetery.

Conclusion

I feel that the connections identified by ThruLines as going through Anna Lee (Howell) Boseman are highly reliable.

Mary-Alice’s ThruLines – Part 2

DNA
ThruLines Thursday
Howell-Hobbs

This week I took a look at some of my wife’s Ancestry DNA matches and some of her ThruLinestm results.

DNA Matches

There were no new matches in her 2nd cousins and closer, so I started looking at her third cousins.

The first three were 3rd to 4th cousin.

Individual cM shared on x Segments Line Comments
3C = 3rd Cousin
D. L. 196 cM 11 Seg Hobbs 3C – Samuel Aquilla & Martha Ann (Bryan) Long.
C. C. 179 cM 8 Seg (Howell?) No Tree – I’m awaiting response to contact email. 
J-7 166 cM 9 Seg Hobbs No Tree – I’m awaiting response to contact email.

ThruLinestm

No new connections on her grandparents.

For her great-grandparents, there were 2 matches for her Howell/Vinson line and 3 for her Hobbs/Long line. There were no new individuals on her Darling, McAllister, Huber, or Trümpi lines.

Howell Line

Both of the individuals connect via Grandpa Howell’s sister Anna Lee Howell. One indicates that he is descended from William J. Boseman and the other indicates he is descended from Virginia L. Roseman.  My records indicate that Anna Lee married William Boseman in 1886 and had three children with the Boseman surname, Maggie, William, and Jesse. After that, my records show that she had five children with the surname Roseman. I’m not showing that Anna had a second marriage or showing any other reason for the surname change.

That lets me know I need to look more closely at Anna Lee Howell and her life and her children. Also, I’ll look more closely at William Jackson Boseman (1888-1962) and Virginia L Roseman (1905-___) and see if I can untangle the surname.

Hobbs Line

There were three ThruLinestm matches along the Hobbs line. All three were through great-aunt Annie Hobbs (1872-1953) who married Frank Alton Armstrong, Sr in 1890. They had three children, their oldest, Hazel G Armstrong (1895-1997). Hazel married Itimous Thaddus Valentine (1887-1970) and had five children that I am aware of. One of those children (possibly living) had at least four children, two of whom tested and were already in my (private) tree. The third person matching is J.H. a great-grandchild of Hazel through one of the other children (possibly living). I didn’t have him in my tree, but I did have his mother in my private tree, so I’m confident enough in his relationship to add him to my tree.

DNA Relationship

ThruLinestm indicates that both are second cousins twice removed. DNA Painter’s Shared cM Project 3.0 tool v4 indicates that 2C2R should share between 0 and 261 cM of DNA with an average being 74cM. The ThruLines match “RC” and my wife share 52 cM and the second match shares 60 cM; so the proposed relationship fits the amount of DNA shared.

Conclusion

Genetic matches and TrueLines confirmed several people in my tree. It let me know that I need to further research three ancestors on a secondary line, and it allowed me to confidently add one new cousin.

Final Comment

If you are a descendant of Peter Fletcher Howell (1842-1924), I’d love to learn how you and my wife are related. Testing with Ancestry DNA is an excellent way for us to confirm our relationship and possibly you broaden your tree as well.

My other ThruLines posts are listed under the ThruLines Thursday category.

Disclaimer

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Hobbs – Surname Saturday

Name Origin

Hob is a “pet form of Robert” and Hobbs is a patronymic form for Son of Hob, as is Hobson.

Geographical

Worldwide there are approximately 99,273 people who bear the Hobbs surname. The vast majority, over 62,000 in the United States, with England and Australia being distant second and third (about 18,000 and 8,000 respectively). Interestingly, in terms of frequency, the little country of Vanuatu has the greatest proportion of the Hobbs surname, where one in 1,644 people have the surname.

Direct Hobbs Ancestors

5.  Mary Lillian Hobbs Howell (1885-1964) LVSF-NCZ
10.  James Ashley Hobbs (1843-1920) – Family Search: M4G8-BZX
20.  George W Hobbs (1805 – 1858) – Family Search: G3WN-FZC

Historical

1920

During the 1920 Census, my wife’s great-grandfather, James Ashley Hobbs was living in Williamston, Martin County, North Carolina. There were 303 Hobbs families in North Carolina during the 1920 Census, but James was the only Hobbs that lived in Martin County. The 75-year-old widower boarded in the household of James R. Hanell. James died later, in November, that year.

1880

According to an Ancestry search, there were 829 people with the Hobbs surname enumerated in North Carolina and one family in Martin County. That family was my wife’s great-grandfather, James Ashley Hobbs, his wife Delora, two sons, Roland and Charles, and two daughters, Annie and Emily. My wife’s grandmother, Mary Lillian Hobbs, was born in 1884. And her 2nd great-grandfather, George passed in 1859.

1840

According to Ancestry, there were 58 Hobbs families in North Carolina. My wife’s 2nd great-grandfather, George W Hobbs, and his wife Mary were married and were raising three children in Beaufort County. They were the only Hobbs family there during the 1840 Census.

Known Hobbs relatives.

My records have identified 145 direct-line descendants of George W. Hobbs (1801-1859) and 23 known Hobbs descendants.

Sources:

 

 

Vincent-Vinson – Surname Saturday

By Don Taylor

Name Origin Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.

It seems that the surname “Vinson” has two separate origins. First is that it comes from the “son of Vin or Vincent.” The second is that it is a corruption or variant of “Vincent.” It does not appear that my wife’s ancestors were from a patronymic society, so Vinson is more likely  a corruption of “Vincent.”

When in doubt, I’ll now use Vincent as the preferred surname, unless there is some uncontroversial reason for using Vinson. That plan suggests I need to relook carefully at my wife’s great-grandmother, Susan R Vinson, whose parents were John and Lenora Vincent.

Geographical

Worldwide there are approximately 283,936 people who bear the Vincent surname.

It is most prevalent in France, with the United States having the second-highest incidence, with over 67,000 Vincent’s in the US.

My Wife’s Earliest Vincent Ancestors

All of my wife’s Vincent ancestors lived in North Carolina. Her earliest known Vincent ancestor was Philip Vincent. It is not clear where he was born, but during the 1800 Census, he was over 45, suggesting he was born before 1755. He lived in Edgecombe County, North Carolina, in 1790. In 1840, Philip’s son, Burkett Vincent, was living in Halifax County with a household consisting of 5 people. His was one of only 22 Vincent families living in North Carolina during 1840. Burkett’s son, John Vincent was born about 1816 in Halifax County and died sometime before 1870. His daughter, Susan R. Vincent (aka Susan Vinson) was born on 22 August 1848. She married Peter Fletcher Howell shortly after the Civil War, on 10 December 1866.

Direct Vincent (Vinson) Ancestors

      1. Great-grandmother: Susan R Vinson (aka Vincent) (1848-1910) Family Search
      2. 2nd Great-grandfather: John Vincent (1816-1870) Family Search
      3. 3nd Great-grandfather: Burkett Vincent (1779-1850) Family Search
      4. 4rd Great-grandfather: Philip Vincent (bef. 1755-c.1807) Family Search

Known relatives.

My records have 155 direct-line descendants of Philip Vincent identified, which is almost 5% of my Howell-Darling Research.

Sources: