Pankey – Surname Saturday

Pankey Surname Origin

“Pankey” is an Americanized form of the German surname Pahnke.[i] Similar surnames include Bankey, Hankey, Panke, and Panky.

My Direct Pankey Ancestors

Geographical

Nearly 99% of all individuals with the Pankey surname live in the United States.[iii]  My Pankey’s were in Virginia when Thomas Armstrong Pankey married Martha Cannon about 1785.

Historical

My most recent Pankey ancestor, Caroline M.A. Pankey, was born and married in Virginia. She and her husband left Virginia for North Carolina sometime between 1840 and 1850. The other twenty-four Pankey individuals I have identified in my tree all have known events in Virginia.

Ancestry indicates that 5 of 36 (14%) of Pankey families[iv] lived in Virginia during the 1840 Census. None of these were my direct ancestors; Thomas died in 1829 and Caroline married Peter M. Howell that same year. A review of Pankey families in the Virginia Census records will immensely help my understanding of this family line.

Oral History

I have no known oral history for the Pankey surname.

Genealogy

I have 21 known descendants of Samuel Pankey. Besides Pankey, descendants of Samual include Binford, Calhoun, Cannon, Ellis, Howell, and Scott surnames.

DNA

DNA Painter indicates that 3rd cousins should share between 0 and 234 cM of DNA with 73 cM being typical.

One individual shares about 52 cM and has a “Pankey” in their three. I’ve come to find that he is a second cousin once removed. There are another 12 individuals who share DNA with Mary-Alice and have “Pankey” in their tree. I should research them later.

Future Actions

    1. A review of Pankey families in the Virginia Census records will help my understanding this line.
    2. Ancestry DNA – Review matches that include “Pankey” in their trees and look for cousins.
    3. Research Samuel Pankey (c. 1738- c. 1807).

Sources:


Endnotes

[i] “Pankey.” In Dictionary of American Family Names, edited by Hanks, Patrick. : Oxford University Press, 2003. https://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195081374.001.0001/acref-9780195081374-e-47236.

[ii] Abbreviations for the Birth, Marriage, and Death locations.

[iii] Forebears indicates there are 4,407 people in the US and 4,453 in the world.

[iv] https://www.ancestry.com/name-origin?surname=Pankey

 

Three More Bragdon’s

Photo Friday
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.I’ve run into Bragdon photos before[i]. I had three more Bragdon’s left in my collection, so I thought I’d look into them.  All three photos are quite small, the smallest being only 1 by ¾ inch, the largest being only 2” x 3”.

Philip Bragdon

The back of this photo says, “Philip Bragdon | Cumberland Mills, Maine.” There is no photo studio or date identified.

From my previous research I learnd that Ralph Marr Bragdon and Harold Lumbard Bragdon had a brother, Philip Osgood Bragdon (1911-1993). I’m sure this is him probably about six years old.

This individual is in Family Search as ID: LYRK-RDZ.

Philip Bragdon, Everett Bragdon, & George O. Bragdon

Everett Bragdon

The back of this photo says, “Everett Bragdon | Apr 1904 | About 10 years old. Cumberland Mills, Maine.” The studio was “The Marshall Studio – Westbrook, ME.”

Ralph (and Harold and Philip) Marr Bragdon did not have a sibling named Everett, however, there was a first cousin, Everett Bragdon who also lived in Westbrook. Everett was born on 3 January 1894 and would have been 10 years old in April 1904.

There were no other Everett Bragdon’s in Cumberland County at that time, so I’m sure this is a photo of Everett Linwood Bragdon (1894-1984) the son of William Bryant and Mary Elizabeth (Hodgkins) Bragdon.

This individual is in Family Search as ID: LYBV-8GX.

George O. Bragdon

The back of this photo says, “George O. Bragdon | died Aug 1914 | Cumberland Mills, Maine.”

There is no photo studio or date identified, however, it is clear the photo is from before August 1914.

George Osgood Bragdon was born 22 December 1866 and died 13 August 1914. He lived in Westbrook during the 1900 and 1910 censuses.

There was a George D. Bragdon who lived in Cumberland County before 1914, however, he was born in 1902 and is too young for this picture.

There was a George Albert Bragdon who also lived in Cumberland County before 1914, however, he was born about 1880 and lived to 1948. Also, he appears to be too young to be the person in this photo.

As such, I’m confident this is George Osgood Bragdon (1866-1914). This individual is in Family Search as ID: KCZ3-GVV

Final Note

If you are related to any of these individuals and can help confirm the identity, I’d love to hear from you. Please use the comment form below.


Endnotes

[i] See: “Bridges, Starrett, Weymouth, and Six Others” – Frances Sarah Bragdon and see “Four Men & a Boy” – Ralph Marr Bragdon & Harold Bragdon.

 

 

 

The Butterfield Bible – Part 4 – Success!

Cover of the Daisy Butterfield Bible

Some weeks ago, I received a copy of an 1889 “Butterfield Bible” from a friend who asked that I share its contents with the “Genealogy World.” During the ensuing weeks, I digitized, transcribed, and posted the contents of the Family sections of the bible.  (Part 1 – Births | Part 2 – Marriages | Part 3 – Deaths)  In the “Final Comment” in Part 3 about the bible, I stated, “If you are a descendant of Sarah Ella “Daisy” (Butterfield) Larrabee (1879-1953), please contact me. I would love to reunite this bible with its family.”

Well, wow! I love it when a plan comes together. Three days after the blog article posted, John Hiatt contacted me. Daisy (the original owner of the bible) is John’s 2nd great-aunt (his grandmother’s aunt. His grandmother and Daisy were raised in the same household, so they were very close.

Anyway, I was able to send the bible to him and reunite the bible to its family.  John is interested in his family’s genealogy and he and his sister are very excited to add the heirloom bible to their family history.

I am glad I could help restore the heirloom bible to its family. It is a good day.

S. F. Auto Death – 23 Dec 1919

Montrans in the News – S. F. Auto Death – December 23, 1919

Montran Monday
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.

 

This week’s entry for Montran Monday is from the Stockton Daily Evening Record (Stockton, CA) dated 23 December 1919.

 

              S. F. AUTO DEATH
                          —–
SAN FRANCISCO, Dec. 23.—One man was killed and four others suffered severe injuries in an automobile accident today near the Hunter’s Point dry dock. E. W. Montran, 45, was killed. Antone G. Garra and J. Mintus are seriously injured. W. W. Parker suffered a fractured skull and internal injuries.

The automobile skidded on a wet place in the street and overturned according to reports received by police. 

Discover you family history through historical newspapers at Newspapers.comNone of my records saw an E.W. Montran previously. So, I was able to add him to my records. E. W. Montran, born about 1874, died 23 Dec 1919 in San Francisco, California. A quick look at City Directories for San Francisco and Stockton for 1919 did not find any Montrans.

In the “California, Death Index, 1905-1939,” via Ancestry.Com, I learned that an Ernest W. Mottram died in San Francisco on 23 December 1919.

Further searches for E. W. Montran found one during the 1910 Census in Missouri and nothing after that. Additionally, the search for Ernest W. Mottram didn’t find anything of interest. So, I’m not sure if this is a Montran or a Mottram. Certainly, further, more in-depth, research should be considered for the future.


Source:

Stockton Daily Evening Record (Stockton, California) · Tue, Dec 23, 1919 · Page 2. “S. F. Auto Death” via Newspapers.Com.

Future Actions:

Determine if the person who died on 23 December 1919 in San Francisco, CA, was E. W. Montran or Ernest W. Mottram.

Endnotes:

[i] Montran Monday – My grandmother’s father was John Montran. She used the surname, as a young child and again when she began in show business. The name is uncommon and most of the Montrans I see in the newspapers are my grandmother during her early vaudeville career. However, with the constant flow of newly digitized material, I often learn of new articles which contain the Montran name. I pay attention to the finding and try to determine a possible relationship of any Montrans to Donna’s father, John Montran.

Montrans in the News – Maronites’ Society

Montran Monday
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.

This week for Montran Monday[i], I found two articles from The Chat (Brooklyn, New York). They both appeared to relate to Montrans that lived in Brooklyn. Neither Mr. Montran nor his wife, May, are a likely fit into my Montran Line.

The Chat (Brooklyn, New York) dated 5 December 1908, Page 27. This article is a brief mention that Mr. and Mrs. Montran and daughter attended a 25th wedding anniversary celebration of Mr. and Mrs. Martin Seibert.

The Chat (Brooklyn, New York) dated 30 May 1925, Page 31. This article is a society page paragraph in which Mrs. May Montran attended a meeting of the Maronites’ Society[ii] along with more than 500 Syrians. 

Sources:

  • The Chat (Brooklyn, New York) Sat, Dec 5, 1908, · Page 27 – Downloaded on July 26, 2019, via Newspapers.com.

The Chat (Brooklyn, New York) · Sat, May 30, 1925, · Page 31 – Downloaded on July 26, 2019, via Newspapers.com



ENDNOTES

[i] Montran Monday – My grandmother’s father was John Montran. She used the surname, as a young child and again when she began in show business. The name is uncommon and most of the Montrans I see in the newspapers are my grandmother during her early vaudeville career. However, with the constant flow of newly digitized material, I often learn of new articles which contain the Montran name. I pay attention to the finding and try to determine a possible relationship of any Montrans to Donna’s father, John Montran.

[ii] Maronites are a Christian group whose members adhere to the Syriac Maronite Church.  A mass emigration from Lebanon and Syria to the Americas occurred in the early 20th century due to famine, blockades, and World War I that resulted in between one-third to one-half of the population. Source: Internet: Wikipedia: Maronites – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maronites