Follow-up on Samuel Pankey

Howell-Pankey Line
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.One of my regular steps in researching ancestors is to “Find BMD Records for each of the children.” In the case of Samuel Pankey’s children, I wanted to pay particular attention to which children had which mother’s. I believed Samuel had eight children, five by one wife and three by a second wife; I wanted to confirm that.

As I began searching for sources, I found an amazing treasure-trove of information in a book, John Pankey of Manakin Town, Virginia, and His Descendants: Descendants and Connections of his Son Stephen Pankey, Sr., of Lucy’s Springs, Chesterfield County, Virginia by George Edward Pankey.

John Pankey of Manakin Town is Samuel Pankey’s grandfather and Stephen Pankey, Sr., is Samuel Pankey’s father. I ordered the book via inter-library loan through my library and it came in just a couple weeks. Wow!. Three volumes of material about the Pankey family – eight pages just about Samuel Pankey and his children. There is just so much information it was overwhelming. Volume 2 is about the descendants of Stephen Pankey’s brother and Volume 3 provides corrections to Volume 1 & 2. Anyway, the book will be so useful I bought a copy on E-Bay.

Thanks to page 49 of Volume 1, I was able to fill in much of the information about Samuel Pankey, his wives, and his children. I learned that Mary Ann and Marion were the same person. I thought that was the case, but I wasn’t certain. Likewise, I learned that Betsey Kinsey was actually an Elizabeth. Again, I thought so, but was very happy to have my thoughts confirmed. I’m also certain his second wife was Martha Burton and not Martha Belford. Pretty much everything I had was confirmed by this book.

Also, it is clear that Samuel and the children of his first wife became estranged. In his will he gave everything to his second wife and the children of that marriage and gave the children of his first marriage one dollar each. A clear sign there was a bad relationship between Samuel and his five children with Betsey.

Updated Spouse and Children List

1st Marriage

Samuel Pankey married Elizabeth “Betsy” Kinsey Binford in 1759. They married in “Henrico County.” However, the county name was somewhat flexible as Henrico County became Goochland County, then Cumberland County. Finally, Powhatan county was formed from Cumberland County in 1777.

Samuel and Elizabeth “Betsey” had five children
Updated information in Green.

Child Name Born Married – Spouse Died
Marion 1761 Shaldrake Broaddus
William Stuart
George Stewart[i]
1831
Philip 16 February 1763 Ann Brown
Polly Bogs
Dec 1819
Thomas Armstrong. c. 1764 1783 – Rebecca Hall
1785 – Martha Cannon
Jun 1829
Judith Elizabeth 1767 Joseph Sallee Oct 1818
Elizabeth “Betsey” Kinsey 1770 1787 – Mordecai Warriner
1796 – George Walton
1816

2nd Marriage

Samuel married Martha Burton about 1775. They had three children.

Child Name Born Married – Spouse Died
Samuel Hardin 1777 1878 – Mary Burton Sep 1817
Lelah 1782 (never married) Aug 1812
John 1787 1808 – Frances Kidd 1862

I am really excited to continue my review of John Pankey of Manakin Town, Virginia, and His Descendants. I expect to find many more facts regarding my wife’s Pankey ancestors.


Endnotes

[i] It is not clear if Marion’s husbands William Stuart and George Stewart were two people or one person. Further research is needed regarding Marion’s husbands (or husband).

Ancestor Sketch – Samuel Pankey

Howell Research
Howell-Pankey Line
By Don Taylor

Review

What I think I know.

    • Samuel was born in 1738 in Manakin Town, Goochland County, Virginia Colony[i].
    • Samuel married Betsey Kinsey Binford in 1759 in Henrico County, Virginia Colony[ii].
    • Samuel’s son, Philip Pankie, was born on 16 February 1763 to him and Betsey (Belford). Philip was Christened at St James Northam Parish, Goochland County, Virginia Colony. The birth of Philip indicates that the family surname may be “Pankie” in some records[iii].
    • Samuel Pankey appears in the 1883 “Heads of Families—Virginia, 1783, Powhatan County[iv].
    • Samuel Pankey gave his permission for his daughter, Betsy, to marry Mordecai Warriner on 12 December 1787[v].
    • Samuel died in August 1807 in Manakin Town, Powhatan, Virginia, USA[vi].

What others think they know (and I should consider).

Family Search – Samuel Pankey (1738-1807) is ID LZJ8-NJ3 at Family Search.

    • Samuel Pankey married Martha Burton abt 1775 in Chesterfield County, Virginia Colony. The source is the International Genealogical Index. I have been unable to find sufficient evidence to accept this relationship. However, it appears that Betsey, Samuel’s wife, died about 1770, which explains why her daughter Betsey has the same name. Samuel supposedly had three more children after Betsy’s death; Samuel Hardin, Lelah, and John, and his wife for those children is still a question in my mind. Hopefully, it will become clear as I research all of Samuel’s children.

Ancestry – Samuel Pankey is found in 374 public trees. (Wow) Most are copies of other trees.

    • Several researchers indicate that Samuel Pankey had an 1854 marriage bond with Martha Morton in Richmond County, North Carolina. I have found no evidence that Samuel Pankey, born 1738 in Virginia, never lived in North Carolina. I suspect this is a different Samuel Pankey.
    • Some researchers indicate that Samuel Pankey and Polly Burton married 8 October 1798 in Chesterfield County, Virginia.[vii] This is possible, but the same researchers indicated that Samuel Hardin, Lelah, and John Pankey (born 1777, 1782, & 1786 respectively) are the children of Samuel and Polly. It is possible they lived together for 22 years before they made the marriage legal or 22 years before they reported the marriage. In either event, it is an area for further research. I, however, suspect this is the marriage of Samuel Harden Pankey, son of Samuel, who would have been 22 years old in 1798.

Historical Notes

    • Manakin Town, upstream of Richmond – Source: Library of Congress, 1751 Fry-Jefferson Map

      In 1700 French Huguenot refugees settled an abandoned Monacan village and renamed it Manakin Town in Henrico Shire, Virginia Colony[viii].

    • Goochland County was created in 1728 from Henrico shire (Henrico County). Part of it became Cumberland County in 1749. Powhatan was formed from Cumberland County in 1777. Consequently, dates regarding Samuel Pankey affect the location he was in.
        • 1634-1728 – Henrico Shire.
        • 1728-1749 – Goochland County.
        • 1748-1777 – Cumberland County.
        • 1777-Today – Powhatan County.
    • The 1790 Census for Virginia is lost. The “Heads of Families—Virginia, 1783” is used as a Census Substitute.
    • The 1800 Census for Virginia is lost.

Howell Research – Ancestor #68
Samuel Pankey (1738-1807)

List of Grandparents

    • Grandfather: James Dallas Howell (1879-1964)
    • 1st Great-grandfather: Peter Fletcher Howell (1842-1924)
    • 2nd Great-grandmother:  Caroline M. A Pankey, (1810 … ?)
    • 3rd Great-grandfather: Thomas A Pankey (c. 1760 – 1829)
    • 4th Great-grandfather: Samuel Pankey (1738-1807)
    • 5th Great-grandfather: Stephen Pankey (1711-1789)*
    • 6th Great-grandfather: Jean Panetier (1685-1717)*
    • 7th Great-grandfather: Pierre Panetier (1647-____)*
    • 8th Great-Grandfather: Estienne Panetier (1615-1691)*

* Note: I have not reviewed or researched 5th Great-grandfather Stephen Pankey or earlier ancestors of his. As such, these ancestors are tentative/notional.

Birth

Samuel Pankey was born in 1738 in Manakin Town, Goochland County (Now Powhatan County), Virginia Colony. He was the second of five children of Stephen and Judith (Chastain) Pankey.

He had one older brother, John, and two younger sisters, Mary Ann and Judith, and a younger brother Stephen Pankey, Jr.

Marriage

1st marriage. Samuel Pankey married Betsy Kinsey Binford in 1759. They married in “Henrico County.” However, the county name may have been somewhat flexible as Henrico County became Goochland County, then Cumberland County.

Samuel and Betsy had five children

Child Name Born Married – Spouse Died
Mary Ann 1761   1831
Philip 16 February 1763   1819
Thomas A. Before 1765 1785 – Martha Cannon Jun 1829
Judith Elizabeth 1767   1818
Betsey Kinsey 1770 1787 – Mordecai Warriner 1816

I believe his wife Betsy died in 1770, possibly in childbirth.

It appears that Samuel remarried and had three more children

Samuel and (???) had three children

Child Name Born Married – Spouse Died
Samuel Hardin 1777    
Lelah 1782    
John 1796    

In 1883, Samuel was enumerated as the head of household. His family consisted of four whites and seven blacks. The four whites must have consisted of:

  •             Samuel
  •             Samuel’s wife (her name is still unclear)
  •             Betsy Kinsey Pankey was only 13-years-old in 1783.
  •             Samuel Harden was about six years old.

John’s wife may have passed, and Lila was the fourth white person in the household.

In 1787, Samuel gave permission for his 17-year-old daughter, Betsy, to marry Mordecai Warriner.

Death

Samuel died in August 1807 in Manakin Town, Powhatan County, Virginia.

Events by Location

    • Virginia Colony, Goochland County, Manakin Town – Birth (1738)
    • Virginia Colony, Henrico County, – Marriage (1759)
    • Virginia, Powhatan County – 1783, 1787
    • Virginia, Powhatan County, Manakin Town – Death (1807)
    • Further Actions / Follow-up

Future Actions

  • Get a copy of John Pankey of Manakin Town, Virginia, and his descendants, by George Edward Pankey. (I’ve requested through interlibrary loan, alternately it is available at NEHGS.) See: https://www.worldcat.org/title/john-pankey-of-manakin-town-virginia-and-his-descendants/oclc/72322
  • Find Vital Records for each of the children, particularly paying attention to the mother’s name.
  • Look for Samuel in Revolutionary War Records.
  • Look for property records for Samuel.
  • Look for probate records for Samuel.
  • Look for burial records for Samuel.
  • Review Church Records for Samuel, his wives, and his children. (Philip was Christened at St James Northam Parish.)

Endnotes

[i] Edmund West, Compiler, Family Data Collection – Individual Records, Ancestry, Samuel Pankey – No Image. Birth year: 1738; Birth city: Manakin Town; Birth state: VA.

[ii] Edmund West, comp., Family Data Collection – Marriages (Provo, UT, USA, Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2001), Ancestry, Samuel Pankey – Betsey Kinsey Binford – 1759.

[iii] Virginia Births and Christenings, 1584-1917, Family Search, Philip Pankie – 29 May 1763. “Virginia Births and Christenings, 1584-1917”, database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VRRC-2KF : 28 January 2020), Philip Pankie, 1763.

[iv] Virginia, U.S., Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1607-1890, Ancestry, Samuel Pankey – Tax List – 1783. Original data: Jackson, Ron V., Accelerated Indexing Systems, comp.. Virginia Census, 1607-1890. Compiled and digitized by Mr. Jackson and AIS from microfilmed schedules of the U.S. Federal Decennial Census, territorial/state censuses, and/or census substitutes.

[v] Pollack, Michael E, Marriage Bonds of Henrico County, Virginia, 1782-1853 (Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1984), Ancestry, Page 173 – Warriner, Mordecai to Betsey Kinsey Pankey.

[vi] Edmund West, comp., Family Data Collection – Deaths (Provo, UT, USA, Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2001), Ancestry, Samuel Pankey – No Image. Edmund West, comp.. Family Data Collection – Deaths [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2001.

[vii] Dodd, Jordan. Virginia, U.S., Compiled Marriages, 1660-1800 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1997. | Original data: Dodd, Jordan, comp.. Virginia Marriages to 1800. Electronic transcription of marriage records held by the individual counties in Virginia.

[viii] Wikipedia – Powhatan County, Virginia – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powhatan_County%2C_Virginia

 

Ancestor Sketch – James Walter

Darling-Swayze-Walter
By Don Taylor

Image by Kate Honish from Pixabay

It is always difficult to follow a person’s records when their name is recorded differently over the years.  James’ surname was recorded as “Waters,” “Walter,” and “Walters” over the many years. I have settled on Walter because it appears to be the surname he was buried with. James was a Patriot, serving in a Virginia artillery detachment during the Revolutionary War.

Howell/Darling – Ancestor #102

List of Grandparents

James Walter (aka Walters, aka Water) (1752-1838)

James Walter was born on either 16 or 17 Feb 1752.[i]in the Province of Maryland (now state of Maryland). He was the first child of John Walter and Ann Parker. He had five siblings, namely: William, Rebecca Conyers, Richard, Lawrence, and James.

Military service

Image courtesy of the Kentucky Secretary of State.

James was a Sergeant in the Revolutionary War. It appears that he joined up about 1777 in Virginia. On 02 Apr 1782 he was assigned to an Artillery detachment commanded by Capt-Lt Lewis Booker. He was known as the “Forage Master.” After the war, he received a warrant for 400 acres of Bounty Land, in what would become Kentucky, for his Revolutionary War Service to Virginia.

In 1793, when he was 40, he married Margaret Ann Swan of Virginia.

James and Margaret Ann (Swan) Walter had six (known) children.

    1. Nancy Anne Walter was born in 1788.
    2. Elkina Walter was born in 1789. she died in 1852.
    3. Catherine Ann Dent Walter was born on 15 Jun 1794 in. She married David Swayze on 30 Jan 1817 in Fairfield County, Ohio. She died on 16 Apr 1868 in Kalamazoo, Michigan, at the residence of her daughter, Elizabeth.
    4. James C Walter was born in 1800; he died in 1874.
    5. Elizabeth Walter was born before 05 Jan 1804[ii].
    6. John Walter was also born before 05 Jan 1804ii.

In 1804, James Walter executed a Deed of Trust transferring his property in Kentucky to Elijah Pollard of Frederick, Virginia, USA

James Walter died on 10 May 18381 in Lancaster, Fairfield County, Ohio, USA. He was buried at the Old Methodist Cemetery. Later, he was reinterred at the City Burial Plot, Lancaster, Fairfield County, Ohio.

Continue reading “Ancestor Sketch – James Walter”

Ancestor Sketch – Meredith Mannin (1802-c.1885)

52 Ancestors – Week 2018-39
By Don Taylor

Meredith didn’t follow the typical “go west young man” life of so many of my ancestors. Meredith was born in Virginia about 1802. He went west as a young man to Bath County, Kentucky, where he married.  He then moved west to Missouri. After several years in Missouri, he moved back east to Boone County, Indiana. He returned east again and settled in Carter County, Kentucky. Finally, he appears to have died in Bath County after returning to the place of his youth.

Brown/Roberts Research 2018 – Ancestor #104

List of Grandparents

Meredith Mannin (1802-c.1885)

Birth

The Mannin family bible clearly indicates that Meredith Mannin was born on 12 June 1802. Sadly, that family bible isn’t a contemporary source record. The bible record is from the Civil War record file of Meredith’s son Zachariah. The record appears to be written by one person at one time. It was clearly written after 1838 and probably not until the 1860s. The 1850 and 1860 Census records indicate he was 48 and 58 years old respectively, suggesting the birth year of 1801. The 1870 and 1880 census records re-establish his birth year as being 1802, consistent with the Bible record.

It is unclear who his parents were. Some sources suggest that his mother, Catherine Barnett, married both John Bosel Mannin and his brother Meredith Mannin. I’ve accepted his father being John Bosel Mannin and know that I need to do much more research in this area.

In any event, I believe his siblings to be:

Charles b. 1796 in Virginia
Martha b. 1798 in Virginia
John b. 1799 in Virginia
Tubal b. 1800 in Virginia
Meredith b. 1802 in Virginia
Samuel b. ca. 1804 in Kentucky
Tarleton b. 1811 in Kentucky
John Bosel b. 1915 in Kentucky
Mary b. 1826 in Kentucky

Childhood

Nothing is known of Meredith’s childhood. Sometime in 1803 or 1804 the family relocated to Kentucky.

Marriage

Meredith and Rachel Fugate’s father signed a marriage bond on 14 February 1825. It is unclear if they married on that date or three days later, on February 17th. See: Marriage of Meredith Mannin & Rachel Fugate. Enoch was born on 3 January 1823, two years before Meredith and Rachel were married. While Rachel was 4-months pregnant with Isaac she and Meredith married.

Meredith and Rachel had 12 children. Their first three children, Enoch, Isaac, and Thomas were born in Kentucky. About 1828, the family moved to Missouri and had three children while in Missouri – Tubill, Reuben, & Katharine. About 1835, the Mannin’s moved 250 miles back towards the east to Boone County, Indiana. There they had four more children, John, Mahala, Sarah, & Elizabeth. Finally, about 1841, the family moved back to Kentucky where their two youngest children, Zachariah & Tarlton, were born.

Adulthood

1830 Census indicates the family is in St Ferdinand, St Louis, Missouri:

3 Males under 5, One presumed to be Isaac, Age 5
                        One presumed to be Thomas Hillry, Age 3
                        One presumed to be Tubill, Age 1
1 male 5 to 10       Presumed to be Enoch, Age 7
1 male 20 to 30.    Meredith Mannin, Age 28.
1 Female 20 to 30 Presumed to Be Rachel Fugate, Age 26.

Map showing Meredith’s land.

In 1837, Meridith Mannin owned 40 acres of land about four miles north of Lebanon, Boone County, Indiana, in Washington Township, the SE ¼ of the NE ¼ of Section 12.

 

1840 Census indicates the family is in Boone County, Indiana:

2 Males 5 to under 10  – Presumed to be John (age 5) and Reuben Calloway, (Age 9)
1 Male 10 to under 15 – Presumed to be Thomas Hillry OR Tubill (Age 13 or 10)[1]
2 Males 15 to under 20 – Presumed to be Enoch (Age 17) and Isaac B. (Age 15)
1 Male 30 to under 40 – Presumed to be Meredith Mannin (Age 38)
3 Females under 5 – Presumed to be Mahala (Age 2), Elizabeth  (Age 1), and Sarah Jane (a newborn)
1 Female 5 to under 10 – Presumed to be Katharine Susan (Age 7)
1 Female 30 to under 40 – Presumed to be Rachel Fugate Mannin (Age 36)

 

The 1850 Census indicates the family is in Carter County, Kentucky

Meradith Mannen – 48 – Farmer 250   VA
Rachel         “       47                                      KY
Tubal          “        20      Laborer                Mo
Reuben       “       17        Laborer                “
Cathrine S   “     15                                       “
John           “        13                                     Ind
Mahala        “      12                                     “
Sarah          “        10                                     “
Zachariah    “       8                                    Ky
Tarlton        “        6                                     “

The 1860 Census indicates the family is in Bath County, Kentucky. Only four of their children are still with them:

Meredith Manning  – 58 Farmer – Born Virginia
Rachel   “             57      Kentucky
Zachah   “            18      Farm Hand – KY
Mahala                21      KY (Apparent Error)
Sarah                   19      KY (Apparent Error)
Tarlton                16      KY

Rachel died on 7 May 1870.

The 1870 Census finds Meredith in Carter County again. Living with him are his daughter Sarah Jane, her husband and their three children. Also, with them are two of Meredith’s grandchildren. One more person, Rodeth Richard, probably Sarah Jane’s sister-in-law, is also living with them.

Merideth Mannin            M      67      Virginia       Farmer
Jane Richardson            F       26      Kentucky     Keeping House
James Richardson         M      26      Kentucky     Farmer
Rachel Richardson         F       7       Kentucky
James Richardson         M      4       Kentucky
William Richardson        M      2       Kentucky
Rodeth Richardson        F       17      Kentucky
Ruben Tapp                  M      15      Kentucky     Farm Laborer
Evaline Tapp                 F       13      Kentucky

The 1880 Census now finds Meredith living in the household of his daughter Sarah Jane, her husband and their six children now in Tanyard, Bath County, Kentucky:

James Richardson Self    M      43      Kentucky, Farmer
Sarah Richardson Wife   F       41      Indiana, Keeping House
Rachal Richardson Dau. F       17      Kentucky
James Richardson Son   M      15      Kentucky, Laborer
William Richardson Son  M      13      Kentucky, Laborer
Meridith RichardsonSon M      8       Kentucky
Charley RichardsonSon  M      6       Kentucky
Melvin Richardson Son  M      2       Kentucky
Merideth Mannon  F-I-L  M      77      Kentucky  (Widowed)

Death & Burial

I have been unsuccessful finding any death or burial record for Meredith.  Several researchers suggest he died after 15 Jul 1885, several others suggest 15 July 1885.

Further Actions / Follow-up



————–  Disclaimer  ————–

Sources

  • 1830 Census (A) (NARA), Com, 1830 Census – Meredith Manning – St Ferdinand. St Louis County, Missouri.
  • 1840 Census (A) (NARA), Com, 1840 – Merradeth [Merediith] Mannon [Mannin] – Boone, Indiana; Roll: 74; Page: 138. Ancestry.com
  • 1850 Census, Com, 1850 Census – Meradith Mannen [Mannin] – District 1, Carter, Kentucky. Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.Original data – Seventh Census of the United States, 1850; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M432, 1009 rolls).
  • 1860 Census, Family Search, 1860 – Meredith Manning – Bath, Maine – Page 131.
  • 1870 Census (FS) (NARA), Family Search, 1870 Census – Merideth Mannin – Precinct 3, Carter, Kentucky. “United States Census, 1870,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MX7P-1PB : 12 April 2016), Merideth Mannin, Kentucky, United States; citing p. 1, family 4, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 545,953.
  • 1880 Census, Family Search, 1880 – James Richardson – Tanyard, Bath, Kentucky. “United States Census, 1880,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCCM-LQ1 : 12 August 2017), Merideth Mannon in household of James Richardson, Tanyard, Bath, Kentucky, United States; citing enumeration district ED 7, sheet 362D, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 0402; FHL microfilm 1,254,402.
  • Find a Grave, Find a Grave, Thomas Hillry Manning – Memorial 41718613 [No Image]. Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 15 September 2018), memorial page for Thomas Hillry Manning (8 Mar 1827–4 Oct 1924), Find A Grave Memorial no. 41718613, citing Manning Chapel Cemetery, Carter, Carter County, Kentucky, USA ; Maintained by Norm Nelson (contributor 47026217).
  • General Land Office Records (U.S. Department of the Interior), Bureau of Land Management, Merideath [Meredith] Mannin – Document Number 25537 – 40 Acres, Boone County, [Washington Township] Section 12, SE1/4-NW1/4 Kidder County. Accession Nr: IN1380__.228. https://glorecords.blm.gov/details/patent/default_pf.aspx?accession=IN1380__.228&docClass=STA.
  • Kentucky, County Marriages, 1797-1954, Family Search, Meredith Mannon and Rachel Fugate, 14 Feb 1825 – Bond. Bath, Kentucky, United States, Madison County Courthouse, Richmond; FHL microfilm 273,003. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V5ZH-L12.
  • Mannin Family Bible, Copy, Mannin Family Bible – Family Records – Births. Bible Records found in Civil War record file of Zachariah Mannin, son of Meridith and Rachel Fugate Mannin. Zachariah died of smallpox Jan. 7, 1864 at Knoxville, Tennessee. Meridith Mannin applied for Zachariah’s pension and received it. From http://boards.rootsweb.com/surnames.mannin/159.1.1/mb.ashx.

Endnotes:

[1] NOTE: The family should include both Thomas and Tubill, however, it appears that only one of the two is enumerated.

 

Schools I’ve Attended – Chapman College & Chaminade

My Life
Those Places Thursday
By Don Taylor

USS Kitty Hawk (Official Navy Photo)

Life aboard the Kitty Hawk didn’t support taking college courses very well. While at sea, my group typically worked 12 and 12. The birthing compartments really didn’t have anything that could be used as a study area. While in port, nobody wanted to do anything except get off the ship, so, it was typical to either be on duty and have a watch or be off the ship. After three and a half years on the Kitty Hawk, I think I only completed two or three courses. They were all part of the PACE – Program for Afloat College Education. The classes I had were sponsored by Chapman College, in Orange, California. Luckily, they all were transferable later on.

After my time aboard the Hawk, I went to a Navy School in Northwest, Virginia which is a tiny town in the southeast part of the state along the North Carolina border, just east of the Great Dismal Swamp. Nineteen weeks of school there prepared me for my next duty station, NAVCAMS EastPac. I arrived there shortly after Naval Communications Station, Honolulu was officially renamed Naval Communication Area Master Station, Eastern Pacific. There I worked in a funny little place we called the “Dinosaur Cage.”

NAVCAMS was a great duty station. It was located in the central valley of Oahu bordering the Eva Forest Reserve. After being on the housing waiting list for a few weeks, I was able to bring my wife and son to live with me in a Navy Housing community called “Camp Stover.” To get to Camp Stover you had to drive through the gate at Wheeler Air Force Base (Now Wheeler Army Air Field) then south through an Air Force housing area to the Naval Housing at Camp Stover. With the small navy base and housing, the larger Wheeler Air Force Base, and the huge Schofield Barracks across Kunia Road, there were many opportunities to take college courses. Chaminade University in Honolulu sponsored the classes and with a stable work environment, I was able to take quite a few courses, both lower and upper division. My lower division classes, such as Marine Biology and Oceanography, transferred to Anoka-Ramsey Community College. My upper division classes, such as Philosophy of Law, 430, later transferred to Metropolitan State University.

The most difficult class I had in college was through Chaminade. It was “American National Government.” For the final, the professor handed everyone two blue books to write our answers in and told us to let him know if we needed more. The test only had ten questions. I’ll remember that first question forever. “The office of the president of the United States consists of 12 major functions. Explain those functions and how they came to be either through law or tradition. Yes, the rest of the questions were like that too. I pretty much filled my two blue books and had to turn in my books when he called “Time.” I left feeling like I might have passed, but probably not. My hand was sore and cramping after two hours of writing when I left. Luckily, I did pass; I so didn’t want to have to retake that class.

After my three years in Hawaii, I decided to leave the Navy after 10 years/10 months active duty and return home to Minnesota. There I would make use of the GI Bill.

Today, the Kitty Hawk is decommissioned and destined to be scrapped. There is some activity to try to make it a museum ship. I would like to see that happen, but I doubt it will. The Kitty Hawk was the last of the aircraft carriers to run on oil and is one of the last two carriers that could be made into a museum. I understand that nuclear carriers are not candidates to become museums due to the destructive dismantling necessary to remove their reactors.

The Northwest, Virginia base has been renamed and is now the “Naval Support Activity Norfolk, Northwest Annex.” The equipment I was trained there to work on is long gone.

The base in Hawaii is repurposed and renamed. Google Earth shows that the equipment I worked on there is also long gone. (Although, it appeared some of it was still there in 2002 when I last visited Hawaii.)

Although I never took classes on the Chapman College campus, I look at it as the place I began my college education. Chapman College became Chapman University in 1991 and is highly ranked among master’s level universities in the west.[i]

I only one class on the Chaminade campus. There was a Marine Biology class that required lab work and labs for the class were on campus. The campus was only about 25 miles away from the base. All of the lectures were in Wahiawa. While I attended Chaminade it added graduate programs and changed its name from Chaminade College to Chaminade University.[ii]


ENDNOTES

[i] Wikipedia: Chapman University – Rankings and titles. History https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chapman_University#Rankings_and_titles.

[ii] Wikipedia: Chaminade University of Honolulu History https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaminade_University_of_Honolulu#History.