My Wife’s DNA Results

I was bad. I mean, I was very bad. I got my wife an Ancestry autosomal DNA test for her birthday. Sure, she received some other gifts from me, but she thinks the autosomal DNA test was more for me than for her. She’s probably right – actually, she’s always right. I like figuring out relationships of DNA matches. For me it is great sport and she knows me well. So, I guess it really was my gift to me on the occasion of the celebration of her birth.  


After the test was done and the results were received, I started looking at her results. Ireland, Scandinavia, Great Britain – no surprises there. Iberian Peninsula is a bit odd, but not unbelievable. Then it hit me – No Swiss!? That is very odd. Two of her great grandparents emigrated from Switzerland. Her great-grandfather, John Huber, came from Windlach, Zürich, Switzerland. Family oral history says that his family farmed the same land for 800 years. Her great-grandmother, Bertha Trümpi, came from Ennenda, Glarus, Switzerland. With both great-grandparents coming from Switzerland, I would have expected her grandmother to have been 100% Swiss. With her grandmother being 100%, I expected my wife to be about 25% Swiss. However, there was no reference to that ancestry in Ancestor.Com’s ethnicity profile for her. That is really odd. Now, the “trace regions” make up 10% of her DNA, but diving into that showed that she about 9% Italian, Greek, and “Europe West.” Anyway, 9% is a far cry away from the 25% that I expected. I’ll have to see if I can get her mother to test as well and see what comes through from those results.

About 9% from areas that include Switzerland

Although the Ethnicity Estimates are fun, the real reason for DNA testing is to make connections with others researching the same family trees and to facilitate communications between cousins researching the same family. For that, I was disappointed that Ancestry allows you to connect your DNA profile only to one tree. Long ago, I separated my wife’s family trees into two different trees – one for her paternal line and one for her maternal line. The biggest reason I did that was that other people, who are researching one line, are never researching the other line. I’ve also found that few people really care about the genealogy of individuals related only by the marriage of a distant cousin. Anyway, I think Ancestry should allow you to link an individual’s DNA to any tree that they are a part of.

Anyway, because Ancestry.com doesn’t allow for multiple trees to be linked to an individual DNA profile, I needed to create a new tree just for her autosomal DNA results. So, I exported her two trees, then merged them into one, uploaded that as a new tree, and then linked her DNA to that tree. Sigh… Not a huge task, but now I have an instance of her tree that I probably will not manage.

I looked closer at the DNA Matches. Wow, 180 matches at 4th cousin or closer. That’s amazing. One of the matches shared a common ancestor hint. A new 4th cousin’s relationship appeared. Ancestry showed my wife’s tree going up to the common ancestor and back down to the cousin.

Then I looked at the cousin’s tree closer. She had parents for that common ancestor, names that I didn’t have. So, I now have two new ancestors named. The great thing is that individual also had sources for those ancestors. I can then take what she has and determine if I can follow her analysis and see if I agree. So, it is a great beginning to another research project.

Matching tree from Ancestry.com 
(first two generations not displayed) 

The other matches (3rd cousin or closer) either have private trees or do not have meaningful trees on Ancestry  matched to their DNA. I will need to contact each individual and see if they have a tree elsewhere they will share with me. In any event, there are many new leads to follow because of the autosomal DNA testing of my wife.

Actions to take:

Have my wife’s mother tested though Ancestry.
Follow-up research with Catherine A.D. Walter (wife’s shared common ancestor).
Contact each of the 5 people identified as 3rd cousins and
   see if we can determine the relationship and
   identify and research any new ancestor leads.  

————-  DISCLAIMER  ————-

Start Looking

Brick Wall – Jacob Huber (bef 1860–?)

By – Don Taylor

I know that “crossing the pond” can prove frustrating in
genealogical research. Jacob Huber really brings that point home clearly to
me.  I know virtually nothing about
him.  When I first began working on my
wife’s genealogy, I was so happy to learn that her mother had some family
photos of the Hubers from the turn of the previous century (my guess) and, most
excellent, the photos included names on the back. 
“The Huber Family”
“Back of the Huber Family”
Then, when I found John Huber marriage record entry which
names his father, it clearly collaborated what the photos indicated.  I also knew from several records that John
Huber was born in Windlach, Switzerland, I assumed that Jacob lived there. 
I then began my regular process to find information
regarding Jacob.  I found nothing.  In my searching, I found another person
researching the Hubers in Windlach. 
Although his or her Hubers certainly were not the same ones I’ve been
seeking, a response to his post on Ancestry Message Boards suggested ordering
parish records for the Canton through the family history library. 
What a great idea. Maybe there is a hole in the brick wall. I
searched the Family Search catalog and found three entries for Church records in Zurich. Of course, most are in German. 
The first one appeared to cover 1600-1700, outside of my search area.
The second one related to Immigrants in 1859 — Also outside of my search area. But, the third one “Die
Pfarrbücher der Züricher Landschaft als bevölkerungsgeschichtliche und
chronikalische Quelle”– what might that be?  Thanks to Google Translate, I learned it means, “The parish registers of
Zurich’s landscape as historical population and chronical source”  Perfect.  Could it be exactly what I’ve been looking for. I then saw it is a book, not so
good, then I found a call number and then the disappointing words,
“availability: missing.” There is a link to see if the book is available
anywhere else through World Cat. Sadly, it isn’t available anywhere else. Also,
World Cat has a note saying, “The use of parish registers as a historical
source in the rural areas of Zürich, Switzerland.”  Clearly, a better translation than what
Google provides. I was afraid of that. The book isn’t the parish registers;
rather, it is a book, in German, about using parish registers.  Not of any help to me.
So the hold in the brick wall that I thought I had seen
wasn’t really a hole.  Maybe just a crack
in the mortar but it does provide a new set of angles to work on.  I’m sure I’ll find a way to see the parish
records without going to Switzerland. 
I’ve just got more to do. So, I guess I’ll suggest that when you hit a brick wall, don’t despair.  Poke around a bit and you should get some ideas. As long as you have further actions to do it isn’t really a solid brick wall. There is still a hole you can work through. 

Bio – Jacob Huber (bef. 1860 – bef. 1960)

Jacob Huber was born in Switzerland[1]
sometime before 1860. (That assumes he was at least 20 when his son John was
born).
   

He married Kath Struckland[2] sometime before
1879. (That assumes Jacob & Kath were married when their son John was conceived.)

Family oral history indicated that only John Huber left
Zurich, so it is assumed that Jacob died and was buried in the Windlach/Stadel
bei Niederglatt area.

Further Actions:

Search for
sources of vital records for Windlach/Stadel bei Niederglatt in the canton of Zürich, Switzerland.
Search for and contact people with the Huber surname in the
Windlach area of Zürich, Switzerland
Visit Windlach and Stadel bei Niederglatt, Zürich, Switzerland
(or entice another family member to visit it and do some research while there.)

List of Greats
1.    
John Huber
2.    Jacob Huber
3.    
Jak Huber

Endnotes:

[1] 1910 Census, Census Place: Elberta and Josephine, Baldwin, Alabama; Roll: T624_1; Page: 5A; Enumeration
District: 0013; FHL microfilm: 1374014.
[2] Wisconsin Marriage
Records, Johana Huber and Bertha Trunpe, 02 Mar 1905. groom’s name:  Johana Huber. 

Bio – John Huber (1880-1948)

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 35 – John Huber (1880-1948)

By – Don Taylor

John is a great example of how further research of a person’s
friends can prove that you have wrong person all along. I wanted to increase my
understanding of John’s immigration and how he ended up in Wisconsin when I
thought he was headed for Oregon. I had him arriving in 1901 aboard the SS St.
Paul with two friends. I decided to follow his friends and see what happened to
them. I found them in Oregon in 1910 and then I found another John Huber (born
about 1880) in Oregon as well. Oops. I know that my John Huber was in Alabama
in 1910, so the immigration aboard the SS St. Paul was clearly incorrect. I scrapped
the information I had about his immigration and will start anew.  Sigh…

Bio – John Huber (1880-1948)

John Huber was born 9 September 1880 in Windlach, Kanto,
Zürich, Switzerland. He was the oldest of five known children of Jacob and Kath
Stuckinger Huber.
Nothing is known of John’s childhood. However, in 1901 he
immigrated to the United Sates[1]. He
appears to have headed to the Swiss Colony area of southern Wisconsin where he
met Bertha Barbara Trumpi. 
The two were married on 2 March 1905 in New Glarus, Green
County, Wisconsin, probably at the Swiss Church, in an ecclesiastical ceremony
by Rev. A. Roth. The 1905 Wisconsin Census finds the couple living on a farm
that they rented in Primrose, WI[2], about
8 miles north of New Glarus.
In spring of 1908, they had their first child, a girl,
Florence Wilma Huber.
Sometime between then and December 1909, the young family
moved to Alabama where their only son, Clarence Eduard Huber was born. The
family is seen farming their own farm in Elberta and Josephine, Baldwin County,
Alabama in the 1910 Census[3]. The
1910 Census also indicates that John had submitted his First Papers for
Naturalization.
It is likely the Hubers succumbed to advertising directed
towards Swiss immigrants in Wisconsin and Illinois, which promised cheap land,
without snow and cold, in a Swiss Colony in Alabama. In any event, they bought
a farm in Alabama and worked it for seven to eight years. Then they bought a
farm from Jacob Spitz in James Township, Saginaw County, Michigan in 1916.
It doesn’t appear that John became a naturalized citizen. The
1910 census indicates that he submitted first papers. In the 1920 Census, he
was listed as an alien. The 1930 Census indicates that he was naturalized. However,
the 1940 census, once again, indicates he had only submitted first papers. It
is the recollection of his granddaughter that in the mid 1940s he indicated he
was still a Swiss citizen and “didn’t like America much.” That is not to say he hated America, rather, he spoke of Switzerland as if it were heaven. My suspicion is that
he never became a citizen and only went through the process enough to have
submitted first papers.
In 1929, his daughter, Florence, was married to Robert Harry
Darling.
The 1930 Census shows John, a poultry farmer, with his wife
and son, Clarence, living on the Farm on St. Charles road in James Township.
In 1934, Florence died leaving a granddaughter to be raised
by her widower. 
The 1940 Census finds John, Bertha, and son, Clarence,
living in the same house as they did in 1935 (and 1930). John owned the farm
worth about $4000 in 1940[4].
The daughter of Florence (their granddaughter) would come to live with him and his wife in the 1940s.
John died on 5 Oct 1948 from a lingering illness at St.
Luke’s Hospital in Saginaw, MI. At the time of his death, he was a member of
the Evangelical Church.
He was buried at Lot S464, Section
116, in Oakwood Cemetery, Saginaw, Michigan.
Notes:

Do not confuse with Johann Huber from Switzerland who
immigrated in Nov 1901 aboard the USMS St. Paul and settled in Oregon.
Do not confuse with John Huber who owned 40 acres in
Bridgeport Township, Saginaw County, Michigan.

Further Actions:

·      Find John Huber’s immigration information.
·      Further research John’s Parents & Siblings 

List of Greats
1.    John Huber
2.    
Jacob Huber
(Jr. ?)
3.    
Jak Huber
(Sr.?)

[1] 1910; Census
Place: Elberta and Josephine, Baldwin, Alabama; Roll: T624_1;
Page: 5A; Enumeration District: 0013; FHL microfilm: 1374014. – Huber,
John

[3]  1910; Census Place: Elberta and
Josephine, Baldwin, Alabama; Roll: T624_1; Page: 5A; Enumeration
District: 0013; FHL microfilm: 1374014. http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1910USCenIndex&h=9295177&indiv=try
[4] Year: 1940; Census
Place: James, Saginaw, Michigan; Roll: T627_1811; Page: 9A;
Enumeration District: 73-18.

Bertha Barbara Trümpi Huber

52 Ancestors #18
Darling-Huber-Trumpi Line

Bio: Bertha Barbara (Trümpi) Huber (1884-1968)

The umlaut helps to confuse Bertha’s records in America. Usually, the umlaut is dropped and Trumpi is used, it is also Trumpe and sometimes Trumpy, misspellings include Trunpe. Bertha was born the oldest child of Bernhard Trumpe and Bertha Koch on 9 May 1884, in Ennenda, Glarus, Switzerland. We know nothing about her childhood, although we do know she “came from a big family and had a stepmother as her father married twice.
She is my wife’s most recent immigrant coming to America in 1903 when she was only 18 years old. She came in the care of an aunt and uncle who traveled from America to get her in Switzerland and bring her back. She then settled in Wisconsin where she met Johann (John) Huber. She married Johann on 2 March 1905 in New Glarius, Wisconsin,[1] most likely at the Swiss Church in New Glarus in a religious ceremony by Rev. A. Roth. Anna Altman and Gebert Huber were the witnesses.
The young couple settled in Primrose, Dane County, Wisconsin. [2]
In April of 1908, she had her first child, a daughter, Florence Wilma Huber.
1909-02-07 - Morning Star (Rockford, IL) Page- 13 - Home Seekers ad
1909 ad for Baldwin County Colonization Co. From The Morning Star (Rockford, IL)

Three Chicago businessmen formed the Baldwin County Colonization Company in 1903: Alexander Klappenback, F. W. Herdick, and Henry Bartling. They hoped to establish a German colony near Perdido Bay, Alabama. In 1904, settlers were offered 20 and 40-acre portions of land.[3] They provided free trips to southern Alabama in February to people who bought property in the Colony.

The excitement of land of their own in the warmth of Alabama enticed the young family to move south in 1907 or 1908. Shortly after she and John located to Elberta, Baldwin County, Alabama, in 1908 she gave birth to her second child.[4]
Sometime between 1916 and 1920, the young family decided to return to the north and purchased a farm in James Township, Saginaw County, Michigan. After daughter died in 1934, their granddaughter came to live with them (Bertha, her husband, and her son Clarence). Bertha spoke Romansh, High German, and English. Her husband died in 1948. She continued to live at the James Township farm until she died from a coronary occlusion on 21 March 1964.
Bertha was buried in an unmarked grave at Oakwood Cemetery, Saginaw, Michigan. Section 116, Plot S692 on March 25th.
List of Great Ancestors
1.    Bertha Barbara Trümpi
2.     Bernhard Trümpe

Sources:

[1] Wisconsin Marriage Records, Johana Huber and Bertha Trunpe, 02 Mar 1905.
[2] Wisconsin State Censuses, 1895 and 1905, Ancestry.Com
[3] Baldwin County, AL Genealogy Trails. See: http://genealogytrails.com/ala/baldwin/cities/elberta.html
[4] 1910 Census, Ancestry.com, http://www.Ancestry.com, Elberta and Josephine, Baldwin, Alabama; Roll: T624_1; Page: 5A; Enumeration District: 0013; FHL microfilm: 1374014.