Another reason to use Genealogy Software

George Scoggins

Some time ago, Dec 2013, I mentioned a problem that I was having because there were two George Scoggins who lived in Cobb County at the same time. One was born in December 1878, the other Oct 6, 1877. They were both farmers who rented their farms and moved around Cobb and Milton counties of Georgia. Once I realized I had two George Scoggins, I knew I had to disentangle the data from each of them and ascribe the correct data to each of them.


I use Family Tree Maker 3 for Mac but the same technique can be used for any of the various products.

First, I created two new “unrelated” individuals, George Scoggins born Dec 1878 and George Scoggins born Oct 1877. Then I went to my data sources and found all of the sources ascribed to my original George Scoggins. If I could determine which of my “new” Georges a citation applied to I added those facts to the correct George and removed the citation from my old George. If I couldn’t clearly determine which source/citation applied to which George, I skipped it then and came back to it as I continued to build out my new facts in an iterative process. Once all of the facts I could glean out of each of my sources/citations were completed, I merged one of the new Georges to my old George and left the other George as an unrelated individual.

In my notes for each of the individuals, I place a short line or two that describes the distinguishing characteristics (Birth/death/spouse/children) for future reference.

Sylvanus Scoggins

The process worked really well. As I continued my research on
George, I found his father was Sylvanis/Sylvanus/Sylvania Scoggins. He was also
known as “Bud.” Nice, I always like finding the name of another ancestor. As I
continued researching him, I realized that his father was also
Sylvanis/Sylvanus/Sylvania but appears to have gone by Henry.

Sylvanus “Bud” Scoggins (1844-1923)
Sylvanus “Henry” Scoggins (1810-1882) (Bud’s Father)

Then in a 1909 Atlanta City Directory I encounter Annie
Scoggins, the widow of Sylvania Scoggins. Oh my. Bud didn’t die until 1923 so
it isn’t his widow. Henry Died in 1882 so it must be Henry’s widow. Oh-oh. His
only known wife was Mary Polly and she died in 1887. So now, I have another
Sylvanus/Sylvanis/Sylvania Scoggins in the area that is totally unknown. I’ll
certainly unravel who each of them are and what their discriminating facts are.
However, without the ability to ascribe each fact to a particular
source/citation and to be able to look at a source/citation and determine all
of the facts associated with it I don’t know how I’d keep it all straight and
be able to untangle the individuals if I got anything wrong. 

Software to manage your genealogical information really
helps when things go well, they can provide great reports and can keep you
organized. Their greater value comes when something go awry. The tool can help
you unravel the twists and incorrect associations when you need to correct the
issues.

————- DISCLAIMER

 ————-

Happy New Year – 2015

Happy New Year!  

I hope your holidays have been a lovely and joyous as mine and that your New Year be safe and prosperous. In ending my 2014 year I thought I’d update everyone on what I anticipate for the new year. The big news for the new year is my new domain.

DTAYLORGENEALOGY.COM


I’ve decided to add a more professional look to my
genealogical efforts.  To help that look,
I have gotten an internet domain name: 
dtaylorgenealogy.com

The first thing you may notice is that when you go to this
blog via a bookmark, or direct entry, to dtaylorgenealogy.blogspot.com you will
find that you are directed to blog.dtaylorgenealogy.com.  I am still using Blogspot to host my blog but
have made an entry in my domain to direct blog.dtaylorgenealogy.com to the
Blogspot site.
I also added a Google Sites website for “D Taylor Genealogy”
and have directed www.dtaylorgenealogy.com
to the Google site. It is still under construction but I plan to use it as a
location to show the kinds of things that I can and will provide as
genealogical services.

Next, I created an email account through Go Daddy.  I am still having trouble with it.  I am receiving email through them okay but
can’t seem to send email from Apple Mail or Outlook. I can send from the web
interface fine though.  I’ll see if I can
fix it soon.  In any event, you can send
mail to me via “don (at) dtaylorgenealogy.com” and I’ll receive it.

CURRENT ACTIVITIES


Over the past few weeks I’ve received a lot of things to
work on.  On the Brown/Montran
Research I’ve received a letter and some eMail’s from my Uncle Russ that will
help put some additional information regarding my great grandmother, Ida Mae
Barber, and her husband Harvey Knight.  I
also received over 800 photos of various relatives from a cousin.  It will take some time for me to categorize
those photos and incorporate them into my research.

On my Madonna Montran
research, I have dozens of additional bookings that I know of and will continue
bi-monthly posts regarding her vaudeville life.

Joyner Library
Clock Tower – Joyner Library
East Carolina University
Courtesy: Wikimedia Commons 

On the Howell/Hobbs
research, I recently received a book through inter-library loan from the J. Y. Joyner Library about Martin County History. It is a two
volume set and has dozens of references in it regarding the Howells including
the Armstrong, Bryan, Hobbs, Howell, Johnson, Long, and Price families that
lived in Martin County.  I’m looking
forward to researching them. I am so grateful for the interlibrary loan system.


On the Darling/Huber
research I have several areas of research that I’m going to pursue.

Finally, on the DNA research front,
I’ve encountered another person for whom I have a DNA match on my paternal
side.  Unfortunately this individual only
has the surnames for 9 of his 16 2nd great grandparents named and
only 10 of his 32 3rd great grandparents.  Family Tree DNA is suggesting that he and I are
related as 2-4th cousins so we are likely to need to go back to the
3rd greats to find a common ancestor. We will see.

PROJECTS

One minor project I’m doing is posting poetry written by my grandfather, Dick Brown, to my facebook wall. I typically find an appropriate graphic to accompany it and post it as public.

On my projects for friends, I have six different ones.  I use these
projects to help hone my skills by exploring other people’s family histories.  I try to give each of these projects a day’s
work every 6 to 8 weeks. The projects I am working on include
the following:

Adair,  Burlison,  Kirks*,  Pettus,  Rode,  and Smith.
I will be replacing my “Web Pages” tab on the blog with a
page that speaks about these projects and moving “Web Pages” to the www site. 

PRESENTATIONS

I have recently updated my “Getting to Know You”
presentation.  I don’t currently have a
good way to display the presentation.  The last time I gave the presentation, I
copied it to a thumb drive, and connected the thumb drive to someone else’s
computer that was connected to a large screen TV.  It worked fine for the venue I was at, but probably
won’t work well elsewhere.  I will
probably need to get a projector and a way to connect it to my iPad to better show
it to groups.

Also, I’ve been thinking
about putting together a networking presentation that describes how to use social
networking to improve your genealogical research.  I have a lot of the material and many ideas about
how to approach it.  I just need to put the
presentation together.  I know I can get
some offers to present that type of material.

* Note: I am a contributor for the Kirks tree, not the owner/manager
of that tree.
————Disclaimer ————-

Y-DNA Projects – 16 December 2014

Where I am at with my Y-DNA Projects, 16 December 2014

My Wife’s Y-DNA – Ancestry
My wife’s brother tested his Y-DNA with Ancestry.Com. Because they have quit supporting Y-DNA and because I haven’t done a transfer of the Ancestry results to Family Tree DNA, there are no new results. I’ve thought about transferring his results to Family Tree DNA however, it costs $58.00 and I’m feeling broke this month. Maybe next year. Also, I’m disillusioned by my Y-DNA results (see below), so maybe not next year either. We’ll see.

Family Tree DNA 

Join the Genealogy Revolution.
Search for your surname in the largest DNA database of its kind!

My Surname

Begins with
Equals
Contains
Ends with
Sounds like

My closest hit to my DNA (89% likelihood a common ancestor in 8 generations) still hasn’t answered. So, I emailed him again last month. Still no answer. No new matches either. Sigh….

My Friend T-Roy
I’ve been helping a friend, T-Roy, with his genealogy. In particular, his paternal side is lost. We know precious little regarding his grandfather and nothing before that. Because of the many disappointments I have had with Y-DNA testing, I am reluctant to recommend that path any longer. Maybe an atDNA test will provide results. There is such a large base if atDNA test subjects.

Conclusion
I’ve decided to break my blogs regarding DNA testing into two groups threads. This one regarding Y-DNA and another thread regarding atDNA. That way I can track and report statuses on each of the project areas better.

————Disclaimer ————-

Two George Scoggins’ in Cobb County, Georgia?

Two George Scoggins’ in Cobb County, Georgia?

I’m always prepared to start over a particular line of research if an inconsistency occurs and it seems I have one in my Scoggins Project.   
I was doing research, for a close friend, on a Scoggins line in Cobb County, Georgia.  He knew virtually nothing about the line so I figured I’d give him a help. As I researched his great-grandfather I quickly found him in the 1940 census.  I was quite certain I had the correct family. His grandmother was in the household as the daughter of the head. The ’40 census indicated they lived in the same county in 1935, so finding them in a nearby location, in the same county in 1930 made sense. Continuing back in time, I found them in the same county 1920 (about 10 miles away). These moves in the county didn’t surprise me because in the records, they were renting the farm that Mr. Scroggins was working.  
Snapshot showing birthdate of 6 Oct 1877
From US World War 1 Draft Registrations
Thanks to Ancestry.Com

 I then found him in the World War I draft registrations.  It was interesting to note that it said he was two years younger than his cemetery marked indicated.  I wasn’t too concerned about that because the birthdate, 6 October, was the same in both cases.  I found consistency in most everything I found.  Certainly there were a few here and there, the names were G George, George C, George G, and, of course, George without an initial.  One record said his middle name was Lester which concerned me somewhat, but not a lot.

In the 1910 census, I found the family in the next county over.  That was really good, because I remember my friend mentioning his ancestors had a farm way back when in that county, near where the census indicated they were living.  Then, I found him in the 1900 census.  Poo.  Not right.
Snapshot from 1900 US Federal Census
Thanks to Ancestry.Com

The 1900 census is fantastic because it includes the birth month and year of everyone.  The census indicated that George’s birth month was December and the year 1878, not 1875-1877 as the other records I had for George indicated.  The siblings were basically the same as I had been documenting along the way. Clearly this was a different George Scoggins than the one I had been tracking. But, sibling names and many other bits of information were similar, but the birthdate was way off. It would be easy to say that the info was wrong and then continue on my merry way, but I know that something isn’t right.  

Person back at their drawing board.
Public Domain
Via Wikimedia Commons
I will go back to ALL of the original sources I used and analyze them very closely knowing in retrospect that there were two George Scoggins in Cobb County, born about three years apart, both of whom had siblings with the same names. It will take some time, but I will eventually untangle the mess. I’ll probably even find that the two George’s are cousins or otherwise related.  I’ll be surprised if they are not.  As I said, when you are certain something isn’t right, be ready to drop all assumptions, start over completely, and document all your decisions carefully.

Genealogy Bank

Check out Genealogy Bank as a source for gifts.  They are currently running a Christmas Special, on gift memberships.  But a Genealogy Bank membership would make a great birthday present or a thank you present anytime.

I use and prefer Genealogy Bank over the other newspaper archive services. 

Deserter, Traitor, Malingerer?

Deserter, Traitor, Malingerer? You Decide.

Sometimes there is a reason why a family doesn’t speak much about an ancestor.  A very good friend of mine had virtually no oral history regarding an ancestor, a second great grandfather. He and his family have been in Georgia for many generations and he was sure that if his second great-grandfather was able bodied he must have fought in the “War of Northern Aggression” (the Civil War to us Yankees.) I told him I’d take a look and see what I could figure out. 

Bio – Hiram Frank Glazier (1838-1916)

Meriwether County, Georgia
(Courtesy Wikipedia)
Hiram was born on May 25th, 1838, the fourth of six children, in Meriwether County, Georgia. His parents were Franklin H. and Ruth Glazier. He had one older brother, John, and two older sisters, Mary and an unknown sister. By 1850, when Hiram was only 12, his father was gone either through death or abandonment. He was loving with his mother, one sister and three brothers.
Probably in 1857, when he was about 19 years old, he appears to have begun heading west. In Mississippi, he married Jane Donnald on 12 November.  In January, 1860 their first child, Thomas, was born in Texas.  In July, 1860, the Census finds the three of them living near Quitman, in Wood County, Texas. Living with them in 1860 was Thomas Darnell; Thomas was 19 years old and also came from Georgia. Of course there is a wonder if their child was named after Thomas Darnell.

The Civil War

in 1861, Texas seceded from the union, joined the Confederacy, in March, and Hiram had his second child, Joseph. The Civil War broke out on the 12th of April, 1861.  In a pension application, Hiram claimed to have enlisted in Co. C., 1st Texas Reg. Partisan Rangers Cav. However, there was no record of him in the Regiment rolls at the time of his pension application. Sadly, the Units of the Confederate States Army by Joseph H. Crute, Jr. contains no history for this unit.  Not much seems to be recorded about this unit. 
Record of Oath of Allegiance
(Courtesy Fold 3)
According to union records, Hiram deserted on 11 July, 1864, entering the Union lines. Again, according to union records, on the 18th of July, 1864, Hiram took and oath of allegiance to the Union. This activity is not mentioned in his pension application. As a matter of fact, he states that he was never captured during the war. According to Hiram, in March of 1865 he was given furlough for 30 days due to a “disabled right hand.”  At the end of the 30 days he didn’t return to duty because the hand was not healed. He considered himself still on furlough at that time. Later, in May of 1865, his unit finally surrendered; Hiram still hadn’t rejoined his regiment because his hand was still disabled.

Post War

In 1866, Hiram’s third child, Charles was born and in 1868 Hiram returns to Georgia. 
In 1869, Hiram married Martha B. Fuller.  I am not sure what happened to Jane Donnald. 
In 1870, Hiram is living with his with Martha, who is 8 years his junior. Thomas and Joseph are living with them as is a still, apparently unnamed child, “Babe” who is two month old in July. Not sure what happened to the “Babe” but the child doesn’t show up in the 1880 Census.
By 1878, Hiram had moved over to Pike County, (the next county east) near Hollonville. His is paying taxes there and renting land. The 1880 census indicates him living with his wife Martha and six sons living with them. Thomas, Joseph, Charles, John, Whitfield, and Howard. 
Martha died between 1886 and 1900, leaving Hiram a widower living with six sons , John, Whitfield, Howard, Lyman, Benjamin, and Hiram, and a daughter, Lizzie.  His oldest son. Thomas, is living next door with his wife and five children.
On 7 May 1901, Hiram married his third wife. Dora Frances Argroves. Dora was much younger than him, 22 years younger. 

In 1904, his son Benjamin died and in 1910 his son, Layman, died also. 
The 1910 census shows neither Hiram nor Dora working, however, Hiram’s son, John, lives with them and is working as a merchant in a general store.
Hiram Glazier’s Marker
(Thanks to Find-a-Grave)
Sometime between 1910 and 1915 Hiram moved to Coweta County which is immediately north of Meriwether county. 
in 1915, Hiram applied for Soldier’s Pension under the act of 1910.  In the application he indicates that he had sold his mule and only had household goods valued at about $300.  He was disapproved for the pension because giving his oath to the Union back on July 18th, 1864 disqualified him from a pension.
Hiram died on June 9th, 1916, in Coweta County. He is buried at at Williamson UMC Cemetery, Williamson, Pike County, Georgia, USA.  He was survived by his wife Dora, and sons, Thomas, Joseph, John, Whitfield, Howard, Hiram/Hebe, and a daughter Lizzie (Ruth) Glazier Camp.

Afterlog  

In 1937, Hiram’s widow Dora applied for a widow’s pension. Her application was likewise disapproved because “Hiram F. Glazier enlisted as private in Co. C, 1st Regt, Texas Calvary July 1862. Deserted to enemy in Louisiana July 11, 1864. Took oath of allegiance to the U. S. Govt., New Orleans, LA, July 18, 1864.”
My working theory is that Hiram did participate with the 1st Regt, Texas Calvary from his enlistment in July 1862 until July 1864.  I would like to think that he became separated from his unit and ended up walking into the union lines where he surrendered.  Both sides had horrific prisoner of war camps.  When given a choice of going to a prisoner of war camp or taking an Oath of Allegiance to the Union Government and promising to never take up arms against them, he picked the latter.  
I suspect he went against his oath to the Union and rejoined his confederate unit.  Had he been caught at that point it would have been treason to the Union and certain execution.  As such, when his hand was “disabled” he did whatever he could to stay away from his unit and a 30 day furlough was a great start.  He had little reason to return to duty with a trigger pulling hand “disabled” so he stayed away a little too long. 
Sources:
Ancestry.Com – 1850 Census
Ancestry.Com – 1860 Census
Ancestry.Com – 1870 Census
Ancestry.Com – 1880 Census
Ancestry.Com – 1900 Census
Ancestry.Com – 1810 Census
ancestry.Com – Georgia, Confederate Pension Applications, 1879-1960 
Ancestry.com –  Georgia Marriages, 1851-1900 
ancestry.com – Georgia, Property Tax Digests, 1793-1892
Family Search – Hunting for Bears – Mississippi Marriages, 1776-1935
Find A Grave – Memorial 25638222 – Hiram Frank Glazier
Fold 3 – Hiram F. Glazier – Civil War Records