Genealogical Fun – John & Charlotte Raasch

Sometimes you just need to do something fun.  I had a couple really bad days researching
the Darling/Huber (See Brick Wall) line and working on my “Adair Project” without any
successes.  A very frustrating few days
of work, so it was time to do something that would be fun. 
While doing some work previously, I had found a couple
Homestead Claims for my “Raasch Project.” Homestead claims generally have some
really great and important information that you don’t find anywhere else.  In this case, I had two people, who certainly
were related, and each had 80 acres in the same section of land.  Also, these type of documents are great to learn
and gain texture to these people’s lives. 

 

  In reviewing the documents, we learned that Charlotte was a
widow, before May of 1868 and homesteaded land in Dodge County, Nebraska.

In another document in the homestead package we learn much
more about her life in Nebraska.  Her
neighbors, one of whom I’m sure was a relative, and probably her son, swore
that Charlotte had been there for six years and had three children. 
The John Raasch homestead papers indicate that
he had built  a one-story 20×32 house
that had four doors and nine windows.  On
the other hand, the Widow Raasch (Charlotte) had built a 12×14 foot house with
one door and two windows.  Other
documents mention that she had dug a well and had a shed.  It had to have been a harsh life.  Mother and three children in a house very
much like the John Curry House photographed by Solomon D. Butcher made
available by the Nebraska State Historical Society.  I’ve seen “Nebraska Gothic” before and never thought much of it. A couple making do in the Nebraska homestead period.  Now I visualize my friend’s ancestors, widow with three kids at the same kind of house.  I can her mom asking one of the kids to go out to the well to draw
water in the cold, windy, Nebraska winter.
The John Curry house, near West Union, Custer County, Nebraska, 1886
Photo by Solomon D. Butcher. Thanks to the Nebraska State Historical Society.
Partial map of Township 19 North, of Range 7 East
Dodge County, Nebraska
Then it is fun to take an old map of the area and draw in
the plots that John and Charlotte Raasch had. They bordered each other.
Charlotte’s piece was nice, flat and desirable. 
John’s was bisected by the Elk Horn River which surely made farming
impossible on the southern third of his land.
I can tell how genealogically geeky I am because I find
visualizing how people lived and making up maps of where they lived as fun. I
know my friend, for whom I am doing the Raasch Project, appreciates the effort
I am putting in and the documents I am finding. Meanwhile, I’m just enjoying
the fun of finding cool stuff.  

Happy New Year – 2015

Happy New Year!  

I hope your holidays have been a lovely and joyous as mine and that your New Year be safe and prosperous. In ending my 2014 year I thought I’d update everyone on what I anticipate for the new year. The big news for the new year is my new domain.

DTAYLORGENEALOGY.COM


I’ve decided to add a more professional look to my
genealogical efforts.  To help that look,
I have gotten an internet domain name: 
dtaylorgenealogy.com

The first thing you may notice is that when you go to this
blog via a bookmark, or direct entry, to dtaylorgenealogy.blogspot.com you will
find that you are directed to blog.dtaylorgenealogy.com.  I am still using Blogspot to host my blog but
have made an entry in my domain to direct blog.dtaylorgenealogy.com to the
Blogspot site.
I also added a Google Sites website for “D Taylor Genealogy”
and have directed www.dtaylorgenealogy.com
to the Google site. It is still under construction but I plan to use it as a
location to show the kinds of things that I can and will provide as
genealogical services.

Next, I created an email account through Go Daddy.  I am still having trouble with it.  I am receiving email through them okay but
can’t seem to send email from Apple Mail or Outlook. I can send from the web
interface fine though.  I’ll see if I can
fix it soon.  In any event, you can send
mail to me via “don (at) dtaylorgenealogy.com” and I’ll receive it.

CURRENT ACTIVITIES


Over the past few weeks I’ve received a lot of things to
work on.  On the Brown/Montran
Research I’ve received a letter and some eMail’s from my Uncle Russ that will
help put some additional information regarding my great grandmother, Ida Mae
Barber, and her husband Harvey Knight.  I
also received over 800 photos of various relatives from a cousin.  It will take some time for me to categorize
those photos and incorporate them into my research.

On my Madonna Montran
research, I have dozens of additional bookings that I know of and will continue
bi-monthly posts regarding her vaudeville life.

Joyner Library
Clock Tower – Joyner Library
East Carolina University
Courtesy: Wikimedia Commons 

On the Howell/Hobbs
research, I recently received a book through inter-library loan from the J. Y. Joyner Library about Martin County History. It is a two
volume set and has dozens of references in it regarding the Howells including
the Armstrong, Bryan, Hobbs, Howell, Johnson, Long, and Price families that
lived in Martin County.  I’m looking
forward to researching them. I am so grateful for the interlibrary loan system.


On the Darling/Huber
research I have several areas of research that I’m going to pursue.

Finally, on the DNA research front,
I’ve encountered another person for whom I have a DNA match on my paternal
side.  Unfortunately this individual only
has the surnames for 9 of his 16 2nd great grandparents named and
only 10 of his 32 3rd great grandparents.  Family Tree DNA is suggesting that he and I are
related as 2-4th cousins so we are likely to need to go back to the
3rd greats to find a common ancestor. We will see.

PROJECTS

One minor project I’m doing is posting poetry written by my grandfather, Dick Brown, to my facebook wall. I typically find an appropriate graphic to accompany it and post it as public.

On my projects for friends, I have six different ones.  I use these
projects to help hone my skills by exploring other people’s family histories.  I try to give each of these projects a day’s
work every 6 to 8 weeks. The projects I am working on include
the following:

Adair,  Burlison,  Kirks*,  Pettus,  Rode,  and Smith.
I will be replacing my “Web Pages” tab on the blog with a
page that speaks about these projects and moving “Web Pages” to the www site. 

PRESENTATIONS

I have recently updated my “Getting to Know You”
presentation.  I don’t currently have a
good way to display the presentation.  The last time I gave the presentation, I
copied it to a thumb drive, and connected the thumb drive to someone else’s
computer that was connected to a large screen TV.  It worked fine for the venue I was at, but probably
won’t work well elsewhere.  I will
probably need to get a projector and a way to connect it to my iPad to better show
it to groups.

Also, I’ve been thinking
about putting together a networking presentation that describes how to use social
networking to improve your genealogical research.  I have a lot of the material and many ideas about
how to approach it.  I just need to put the
presentation together.  I know I can get
some offers to present that type of material.

* Note: I am a contributor for the Kirks tree, not the owner/manager
of that tree.
————Disclaimer ————-

Reinold Rode (1905-1992)

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 39

Reinold
Rode (1905-1992)

By – Don Taylor

No Story too Small 
I have a friend that lured me into researching some of her Eastern European immigrants. Actually, she didn’t lure me; she just told me her story and I bit. I had never searched Eastern European immigrants and had no idea how perplexing such searching can be. My friend provided what little information she knew.

Her grandfather is “Reinold Rode and [she is] not certain where or when he was born. We have always gone by April 28th 1901. He was born in either Zhytomyr, Ukraine or Minsk, Belarus.” My Google search showed them over 300 miles apart. Hopefully, I could improve on that location.

I thought that should be easy to figure out when and where he was born, and where he lived before immigrating to Nebraska.

Thanks to
Ancestry.Com, I quickly found him in the 1940
Census[1].  Born in Russia about 1906. Not much help
there.

Continuing on to the 1930 Census I found him again born in
Russia about 1906[2].
Humm, it seems that the 1901 birthdate is probably incorrect – me thinks that 1905 or 1906 is correct. 
RMS Caronia
Photo Courtesy: Wikipedia.Com

I figured that if I could find his immigration record I would know for
sure. So, I looked closely and couldn’t find it. (Grumble, Grumble – It is
never that easy.) The 1930 Census indicated his immigration year as 1922 so I
cast a search for his record looking for anyone named Rode who came to the country in 1922. Then I found him (spelled Rheinhold Rode). Arriving on the SS Caronia
in New York on 26 September, 1922. He was heading to Nebraska to his father, Adolph, (whose name I already had from my friend) with a brother, Rudolph. Reinold was
17 years, 4 months old when he arrived which would put his birthdate in 1905
and his birth month in April or May.  But
most important to my quest it gave a birthplace of “Marijantje, Russia.[3]” Got
it.

Detail of Passenger List which shows
Rudolph born in Lindental and
Reinold born in Marijantje – Image from Ancestry.Com  

A quick search of Marijantje in Google maps found nothing; likewise no results on Wikipedia. Maybe his brother Rudolph’s birthplace Lindental, Russia, will help. Again nothing on Google maps nor Wikipedia. Finally, a Google search yielded a link to the “Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online” (GAMEO). It mentioned that “Lindental was a small Mennonite settlement in South Russia near the railway station Sinelnikovo,” So, where is Sinelnikovo? Google Maps suggested three different places all in Eastern Urkrane, none anywhere near the Belarus border. Also on the GAMEO there is an entry that says that “The village of Lindenthal was located between Kutuzovka and Zhitomir.”

Now I still can’t figure out where Lindental/Lindenthal nor Kutuzovka are but I’m fairly certain that Zhitomyr and Zhitomir are the same place which would put Rudolph’s birthplace near Zhitomyr which is where I guess I’ll tentatively place Reinold’s birth. Am I sure, no, but I think Zhitomir is more likely than Minsk.

I learned how place names in Cyrillic are translated into English in lots of different ways. It seems like every translation becomes a unique spelling. Also, place names changed dramatically in the past hundred years as countries rose and collapsed. Prussia no longer exists, parts became part of Russia and parts became Poland. Today there are Belarus and Ukraine that overlap the same area.

I still have a lot more research to do on Reinold Rode (pronounced “roe-dee”). I know he was a German speaking Russian from the Prussian, Polish, Belarus, Ukraine, Russia area. Maybe a naturalization record can be found, that might clinch it. I definitely have a lot more work to do.

Bio – Reinold Rode (1905-1992)

Reinold Rode was born on 29 Apr 1905[4] in Marijantje,
Russia, which is probably near Zhytomyr, Ukraine today.

S.S. Caronia
Thanks to Great Ships

When he was 17 he immigrated from “Ober Cyrus, Germany” to
the United States aboard the SS Caronia with his brother, Rudolph. The two
brothers met up with their father, Adolph in Madison, County Nebraska. 

Reinold met and married a Nebraska native, Delilah Hefner (Hoefener)
about 1928.
He rented farmland, which he farmed, in Pierce (1930 Census),
Cumming (1935), and Antelope (1940 Census) Counties, all in Northeast Nebraska.

Marker: Rode – Reinold & Delilah
Courtesy: Find a Grave

Sometime before 1992 the Rode’s moved to Tacoma, Washington
where Reinold died on 18 Apr 1992.

He is buried at Trinity Lutheran Cemetery,
Tacoma, Pierce County, Washington State. His wife Delilah passed three years
later and is buried with him.

  
Further Actions:
·      Narrow down Reinold’s birth location.
·      Find Reinold’s naturalization records.
·      Research Reinold’s siblings for additional insight.
List of Greats
1.    
Adolph Rode



[Disclaimer:  The links to Ancestry.Com are connected to an affiliate program which provides a small reward to me if you purchase from them.  Although I receive a reward from them for a referral, my comments regarding Ancestry are based solely upon my experiences with them.]

Endnotes:

[1] 1940 Census; Census Place: Willow, Antelope, Nebraska; Roll: T627_2236; Page: 4A; Enumeration District: 2-32. Line 19, Junold Rode See http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1940usfedcen&h=61663652

[2] 1930 Census; Census Place: Allen, Pierce, Nebraska; Roll: 1290; Page: 5A; Enumeration District: 0001; Image: 11.0; FHL microfilm: 2341025 – Line 20.

[3] Year: 1922; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: T715, 1897-1957; Microfilm Roll: Roll 3186; Line: 30; Page Number: 77.

[4] Social Security Death Index, Number: XXX-XX-6745; Reinhold Rode, Issue State: Nebraska; Issue Date: Before 1951.


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