An Old Settler Departs

Amanuensis Monday
Darling Line
By Don Taylor

I’ve been researching the siblings of Rufus Holton Darling and had three left to research. Sally Ann Darling, Hannah Darling, and Franklin C. Darling. I haven’t been finding much on any of them. I suspected that a Franklin Darling in Minnesota might be Franklin, the brother of Rufus Holton Darling, but hadn’t found any definitive evidence that they were the same person. In searching for Franklin on Newspapers.Com, I encountered an amazing article about the death of Franklin and Rufus’ brother, Abner C. Darling.

Document Image & Transcription

AN OLD SETTLER DEPARTS[i].

Death of Abner C. Darling.

Obituary: Abner C. Darling (1812-1880)
Obituary: Abner C. Darling (1812-1880)

On Monday, Sept. 20, 1880, at his residence, in the town of Grand Chute, near this city, Abner C. Darling, for more than 40 years a resident of Wisconsin, over 30 of which were spent in this city, departed this life at the age of nearly 68 years.

This death created a profound sensation among the old settlers, all of whom were personally acquainted with the deceased.

Mr. Darling was born near Rome, N.Y., October 29, 1912, went with his father’s family, a very large one, to Michigan, when he was a boy. in 1825 was married in Western New York to Miss Nancy A. Green, at the residence of her uncle, Robert Green, who has resided with Mr. Darling for many years, and still survives him at an advanced age; emigrated in 1840 with his wife and their only daughter, now Mrs. L. S. Colman, of Milwaukee, to the very new village of Racine; removed in 1850 to Appleton, then almost a dense forest, and speedily erected a store on College Avenue, which still stands with its red front as one of the few land marks left of Appleton’s early days, and embarked in business. His wife, a most estimable lady, died in the spring of 1867, and some years subsequently he married Miss Sarah Green, daughter of Robert Green, who with three children survives him. Only two of his brothers are living, Henry Darling of Fox Lake, Wisconsin, and Franklin Darling, of Minnesota.

The great fire of 1873, which swept the old Crescent Hotel and many other business buildings, originated in the building he then occupied, about where Schroeder’s furniture now stands and destroyed $4,000 worth of uninsured goods. This loss, with the subsequent depreciation of real estate that followed the Great Panic of 1873, left him nearly penniless, and from that time to his death, it has been a constant struggle with financial disappointment and disaster until the strongman succumbed. Always active ever seeking to rise above the pressure of events, he has commanded sympathy and respect, and this announcement’ of his demise elicited on every hand the most earnest regrets.

Discover you family history through historical newspapers at Newspapers.com
Mr. Darling, during nearly all the years of his manhood, was an active yet unobtrusive communicant of the Methodist Episcopal church, and all who know him intimately will bear testimony that he was sincere and sought to do right. On Wednesday, a large number of citizens and friends, including most of his old neighbors, gathered at his dwelling to pay their last tribute of respect to his genuine worth, and on that beautiful autumnal day, they placed his remains in their resting place, Riverside cemetery, his life work all done, his eternity begun.

—————————

New Facts

This article suggests many new facts. Facts new to me are identified as bold. Questionable facts are identified as red and in italics.

1812 – Abner C. Darling was born near Rome, NY 29 Oct 1812.

1825 – Married Nancy A. Green in 1825 in Western New York. – Question fact.  Abner would have been 13 years old in 1825 and Nancy 9 years old.

1840 – Moved to Wisconsin c. 1840 with wife and only daughter. Although not false, the fact appears to be incomplete. Abner and Nancy’s son, Ned, was born before 1840 in New York and died about 1840 in Racine Wisconsin, so it appears that Abner moved to Wisconsin c. 1840 with his wife and two children.

1850 – Moved to Grand Chute c. 1850 and built a store on College Ave.

1873 – Fire destroyed his stock and the Great Panic of 1873 left him penniless.

1880 – Abner C. Darling died 20 Sep 1880 in Grand Chute, Mich.

1880 – Buried Riverside Cemetery.

Religion: Methodist Episcopal

First Wife:  Nancy Green (niece of Robert Green)

1867 – Nancy Died

Daughter is Mrs. L. S. Colman lives in Milwaukee in 1880.

Uncle Robert Green lived with the family for “Many years” prior to 1880.

Abner married Miss Sarah Green (Daughter of Robert Green) some years after 1867. Sarah and her father Robert are living in 1880

Brother Henry Darling of Fox Lake, Wisconsin is living in 1880

Brother Franklin Darling of Minnesota is living in 1880.

Because Abner’s sisters are not mentioned at all, It appears that they probably had passed before September 1880. Abner’s sisters were Deidamia [Limbacker], Sally Ann, and Hannah.

Conclusion

This obituary provided eight new facts including proof that Franklin located to Minnesota.

Endnotes/Sources

[i] The Appleton Crescent (Appleton, Wis.) · 25 Sep 1880, Page 3; https://www.newspapers.com/clip/19969547/ via Newspapers.Com.

Probate Record – Ezra Sanford – Sales Paper – Part 2 of 2

Transcription Tuesday

Brown/Sanford

Transcription by Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.This week, for “Transcription Tuesday,” I continue looking at the Probate Record for Ezra Sanford of Bennington County, Vermont[i], who died in 1813. The “Sales Papers” consisted of a cover page and two handwritten pages. The cover page indicated that this was the “Division of Ezra Sanford Estate. Recorded Book 5th Page 234 to 237 by Jona E Robinson, Register.” It also indicates that it was received, examined, allowed and ordered to be recorded on October 4th, 1813.

Page 2 of the Sales Papers:

 

There up ?? brook to the foot of the Ridge, there over the ridge
on her Mama;s East line to Timothy Barbers land, thence East
ward on ?? Barber & Isaac Henshals Line to Road at the foot
of the Ridge, thence up the North line of the Road to the Road
that leads Northward to Isaac Heshels & thence Northward
on the West Line of ?? Road to the ??? began at.

We also set to Lucy Sanford the following piece of Land, beginning
at a stake on the south side of the road in the East Line
of the old Williams Lot so called, thence on the East Line of
?? Lot southword to Josiah Wentwout Northward corner
& so in southward on ?? Wistcounts line to Benjamin Bakers Land
Thence on ?? Barber Land westward to the Road thence North
aly on the Road to Timothy Barber Land thence Eastward
by an ?? Timothy Line to the Mill Brook thence down
the mill brook to the Mill, thence on the Mill lane to
the road, then easterly on the south side of the road to the
first bound,

also we set to Lucy thirty acres of wood
land lying on the south side of the wood lot & east
of the line that leads by Elis Dunhams lying in a regular
form __ __ __ __

Ezra Sanford had received one thousand
one hundred and thirty three dollars and ninety in credits
Electa Sanford had received sixty five dollars & forty seven
cents in advance.
Sally Sanford had received seventy nine dollars and thirty three cents
& Lucy Sanford had received sixty-one dollars and eighty three cents —

??? 20th September 1813 we have attended to the business
of our appointment and decided the landed estate of Ezra
Sanford late of Pownal deceased as above described & have also
dre?? the personal estate amongst the widow and lawful
heirs.

We the undersigned ??? { Jos?? Blackinton }
our ratification to this division by { Jebadiah Faunhan }
countersigning the same { Isaac Kimbell }

Mercy Sanford
Sally Sanford
Lucy Sanford
Ezra Sanford

—————

Comments:

Paragraphs above are mine for my clarity, not the original writer.

  • —————

Facts I learned

  • Ezra Sanford left a large estate, many parcels of land and over $1000 in cash.
  • Lucy Sanford inherited two pieces of land.
  • Ezra, Electa, Sally, and Lucy all received money.
  • I noted: Electa did not sign the division agreement.
  • Mercy, Sally, Lucy, and Ezra were all living on 20 Sep 1813.

==============================================

NOTE:  The Cambridge Dictionary defines “transcribe” as to “make a complete written record of spoken or written words.” My transcriptions are seldom perfect but I do my best to convert handwritten documents into typed words for my genealogical purposes.  If you see anything that I have incorrect or can interpret the words I have ??ed, please let me know your thoughts via the Contact Form at the bottom of the page.


Sources

[i] Ancestry.com. Vermont, Wills and Probate Records, 1749-1999 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015. Vermont, Bennington County, Bennington District, Probate Records; Author: Vermont. Probate Court (Bennington District); Probate Place: Bennington, Vermont – Entry for Ezra Sanford Probate – Page 16 (00404).

Probate Record – Ezra Sanford – Sales Paper – Part 1 of 2

Transcription Tuesday

Brown/Sanford

Transcription by Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.This week, for “Transcription Tuesday,” I am looking at the Probate Record for Ezra Sanford of Bennington County, Vermont[i], who died in 1813. The “Sales Papers” consisted of a cover page and two handwritten pages. The cover page indicated that this was the “Division of Ezra Sanford Estate. Recorded Book 5th Page 234 to 237 by Jona E Robinson, Register.” It also indicates that it was received, examined, allowed and ordered to be recorded on October 4th, 1813.

Page 1 of the Sales Papers;

We set off to the widow Mercy Sanford one piece of Pasture
Land lying east and adjoining the road which leads from the schoo
house to Isaac Kimbals & bounded East & North on the Widow
Cartwrights thirds containing about two acres, also a Meadow
lot containing about nine acres bounded as follows beginning
at a pine stump baked standing on the bank of the Branch
Brook thence E/O South to the Mill Brook thence uh the
Mill Brook to the foot of the Ridge, then on the line of the
lot Ezra Sanford bought of Jones Barber to Timothy Bar-
-ber land, then on Timothy Barber North line to the Middle
of the Branch Brook, thence down ?? Brook to the bound
began at; also the home lot containing about 27 Acres, born
did as follows beginning at the corner of the road by the
School house, thence down the road westward 68 Rods to the
East Line of the William Lot so called, thence southward on
the old william east line 82 Rods to Josiah Westcoats North
West Corner thence Eastward on ?? Westcoats Line to the road 22
Rods, thence Northward on the Road to the place began at, also
a wood lot on the East side of the Road containing about 15
acres lying on the North part of ??wood lot & ins to contain all
that remains after spliting off thirty acres on the south part off
?? Lot.

We also set to Electa Miller the following
discarded piece of land, beginning on the west side of the
Road in the Widow Cartwrights South Line, thence running
westward to the southwest corner of the widow cartwrights
lot, thence on the west line of ?? Lot 24 Rods to Isaac
Kimbals Land, thence westward and Northward on Isaac Kim
bale land to the center of the Brook, thence up the Mid-
-dle of the brook 63 Rods to a pine stump marked stand
-ing on the Bank, thence E to S. to the Mill Brook, thence
up the Mill Brook one Rod, thence eastward to the
West side of the Road, one Rod southward from the place
began at, thence Northward one Rod to the place of begin
-ning.

We set to Sally Sanford the following piece of
land, beginning at Electa Millers South East corner thence West
ward on ?? Electa South line to the Middle of Mill brook

—————

Comments:

Paragraphs above are mine for my clarity, not the original writer.

All dates based upon signed date (on page 2) of 20 September 1813.

Ezra Sanford Probate - Sales Papers, Page 1
Ezra Sanford Probate – Sales Papers, Page 1

Facts I learned
http://www.onegreatfamily.com

  • The Widow Mercy Sanford inherited several pieces of land from the estate of Ezra Sanford.
  • Electa married (Unknown) Miller before 20 September 1813.
  • Electa inherited a piece of land.
  • Sally Sanford was unmarried in 20 September 1813.
  • Sally inherited a piece of land.
  • Based upon this record I am changing Sarah Sanford’s preferred name to Sally and making Sarah an “also known as.”

==============================================

NOTE:  The Cambridge Dictionary defines “transcribe” as to “make a complete written record of spoken or written words.” My transcriptions are seldom perfect but I do my best to convert handwritten documents into typed words for my genealogical purposes.  If you see anything that I have incorrect or can interpret the words I have ??ed, please let me know your thoughts via the Contact Form at the bottom of the page.

http://www.onegreatfamily.com


Sources

[i] Ancestry.com. Vermont, Wills and Probate Records, 1749-1999 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015. Vermont, Bennington County, Bennington District, Probate Records; Author: Vermont. Probate Court (Bennington District); Probate Place: Bennington, Vermont – Entry for Ezra Sanford Probate – Page 16 (00404).

Probate Record for Timothy Munsell

Anamnesis Monday
Transcripts by Don Taylor

Cover page for Timothy Munsel Probate DocumentsProbate records are wonderful when you can find them as they provide so much detail and texture about an individual’s life.  I just loved learning that Timothy Munsell‘s family spent a dollar (6 shillings) for “Spirits.”  I also learned the things he had that were of importance. Apparently, no horse but he did have two hogs.

Ancestry.Com is a great resource for Wills and Probate Records. These images come from “Connecticut, Wills and Probate Records, 1609-1999” original data from “Connecticut County, District and Probate Courts.” For all the images and higher quality images see Ancestry.Com. (You must have Ancestry account or be using a library account to access.)

 

Image 1204 – Inventory

Lyme Nov 20th 779

Inventory of Estate of Timothy Munsell

Late of Lyme Deceased

                               £  s  p

  • Wearing apparel 2-12-0
  • Bed & Bedding     2-10—
  • Pewter ware              6
  • Crockery Ditto         6
  • Iron ware                 16
  • Tables & Chairs      12
  • Cupboard & Drawers     6
  • Old Iron                     6
  • Wheel Skeel              3
  • 1 Old Case                 6
  • 1 Lanthorn                2
  • 1 Hogg  150 ?? ? 1-17-6
  • 1 Ditto 50 ??          12-6
  • 5 Bushels Corn     15
  • 1 Bible & Psalm Book     4
  • 1 Pair Heelyard     2
  • Forrage                  1-4
  • Land                       3

———

[Total]                   £ 16-0-0

Elisha Rice

Reynold Peck

Accept’d and called to the above amount execbty(?)
Only the land is allowed to the widow for ????
by order of the judge attest – L. Law Ats


Image 1210 – Receipt

Receipt – One Dollar for Spirits

 

Received Lyme Oct 27 – 1798

Elisheehia Munsell one dollar for spirits

 

 

If you have any suggested corrections to my transcriptions, please feel free to use the comment form below.

 

Amanuensis the Easy Way

Amanuensis Monday
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.A few years ago, I wrote a post about my wife’s 4th great-grandfather, Lewis Bryan (1755-1830) and that he had purchased his land from Robert Bryan. That post received several comments. One included a clue from Gloria Knight who said, “I have found where a “Patent” was issued on 10 Dec 1760 to a Robert Bryan. Source: Halifax County N.C. Land Grants – Secretary of State – Land Grants Record Books 1693-1960. Grant # was 82; File # 14. 520 acres on Conotoe Creek.”

I had meant to find that reference and incorporate it into my information regarding Robert Bryan. I just hadn’t gotten around to it. Her comment/clue reminded me of three significant resources matters.

Networking

So many of us want to be self-sufficient we tend to forget many researchers have been there before and we can and should build upon their work. For example, Gloria’s clue provided enough information that I could easily, and quickly build upon her work. Not just accept what she said but use it as a hint as a beginning point. I know that professional genealogists want every source to be quoted in a fashion identified in Evidence Explained. Sure, that is THE standard for citing sources.  However, rather than getting all twisted around the citation standards, I am most interested in having enough information about the source that I can find it for myself. In this case, a Google search for Gloria’s clue, “Halifax County N.C. Land Grants ” brought me immediately to North Carolina Land Grant Images and Data. Seeing Search Query on the page, I searched for Name: “Bryan” and County: Halifax. Six entries were returned, one the 520 Acres of Robert Bryan.  The page also had a link to an image in Book 14, Pages 114-115. There it was, an image of the original patent book. The key to me is Gloria had provided enough information regarding her source that I was able to find the source in less than a minute myself. To me that is the ultimate reason for citations and building upon or confirming her research is the ultimate purpose of networking.

Wikipedia

I knew from previous research with this family line that Martin County was previously Halifax County.  There are many sites to learn that kind of information. However, I have found that Wikipedia is possibly the best and easiest way to confirm such information. On Wikipedia, just search <NAME> County, <STATE> and you get the appropriate wiki page.  In this case. I entered “Martin County, North Carolina” In the History section of the page returned said,

The county was formed in 1774 from the southeastern part of Halifax County and the western part of Tyrrell County.

I could have just as easily gone to the Halifax County, North Carolina page and learned that,

In 1774 the southeastern part of Halifax County was combined with part of Tyrrell County to form Martin County.

I think every county page on Wikipedia has a “History” section. I find that the County entries in Wikipedia to be a great asset. Besides quick history, there is a Communities section which shows the cities, towns, unincorporated communities, and townships within the county. Great information to have handy when reviewing Census and other records. I can be a real help in understanding that an incorporated community in your genealogy is near town that may have been their post office which may have been in a township.  So, when you see the names change in different documents, you can understand that your ancestors may have been in the same place even though multiple names were used.

Google

Finally, I wanted to transcribe the patent information from the document. I’ll admit, I don’t like transcribing 18th century handwriting very much. I mean, I can do it, I just don’t like doing it. In this case, I could easily read the document started out “Robert Bryan Five hundred and twenty acres.” A Google search of those exact words led to one result. A quick review of the result showed it was a transcript of the document I wanted to transcribe. Dated the 10th day of December 1760.  Then, rather than transcribe the original text, all I needed to do is to read the transcription and see if I agreed with the transcription.  Much faster – much easier. Then, I added the transcript to my source documents identifying it:

Transcription by <Unknown>  found on site, BMGEN.COM
“Genealogy data relating to the Brian and Mitchell families.”

So, I have my copy of the original image, and I have my source for that image documented. I also have a transcription of the information, confirmed and reviewed by me. I am good with that and can move on to the next project.

Transcription

Transcription by <Unknown> found on site, BMGEN.COM

ROBERT BRYAN five hundred and twenty acres of land in Halifax County.

Beginning at a Pine, his corner on Conneto Swamp running thence up said swamp to a Maple at the mouth of Wild Cat Branch; then up said branch to a Poplar in said branch; then W 62 poles to a Red Oak; then S 160 poles to a Pine; then W 40 poles to two Sweet Gums in a branch; then S 280 poles to a Pine; then W 88 poles to a pine in MOSES HORN’s line; then along his line S 23 E 174 poles to a White Oak, his corner on Conneto Creek; then down said creek to a Pine, JOHN HORN’s corner on said creek; then along his line N 17 E 142 poles to a Pine, his corner in said BRYAN’s line; then along his line W 16 poles to a Pine, his corner; then along his line N 270 poles to a Pine, his corner on a branch; then down the branch, his line, to the first station.

Dated 10th day of December, 1760

Conclusion

  1. Pay attention to hints from anywhere – check them out for yourself.
  2. The North Carolina Land Grant site is an awesome resource. Be sure to include it in your resources.
  3. Don’t forget Wikipedia County searches can be helpful.
  4. Check Google (or Bing or Yahoo) to see if the words you want transcribed  have already been transcribed.