Long – Surname Saturday

Long – Surname Saturday

Howell-Hobbs-Long

Long Surname Meaning

The European surname Long is a descriptive term regarding the stature of the original bearer of the name.[i] Think of it in terms of a “long tall” individual. The Chinese surname “Long” derives from the name “Yu-Long” meaning “resistor of dragons.” Finally, there is a Cambodian variant of the name which is unexplained.[ii]

Geographical

Worldwide there are approximately 516,166 people who bear the Long surname.

It is most prevalent in the United State where over half of the people with the Long surname live. Interestingly enough, Cambodia has the greatest frequency of the name where it is the 19th most prevalent name in the country.

In the United States, the greatest incidence is in California. North Carolina is 4th in incidence (people with the surname) and number one in frequency where 1 in 666 people have the surname.[iii]

Earliest Long Ancestors

Annie Deborah Long was born in Martin County, North Carolina in 1846 and died in Martin County, North Carolina in 1913.

Her father, Samuel Aquilla Long, was also born and died in North Carolina.

I don’t know where Samuel’s father, John Long, or his father’s father, Aquilla Long, were born or where they died.

In 1920 there were 1272 people with the Long surname in North Carolina. Twenty-one of those people are known descendants of Aquilla Long. I haven’t had a chance to research John Long or his father, Aquilla Long yet. I expect many more Long relatives to be found when I do that.

Direct Long Ancestors

Known relatives.

My records have 187 descendants of Aquilla Long identified; 21 of them have the Long surname.

Sources:

Endnotes:

[i] Internet: Forebears – Surname Search Results for “Long” on 30 January 2019. See: https://forebears.io/surnames/long

[ii] Internet: Ancestry – Name Origins – “Long Family History” accessed 30 Jan 2019. See: https://www.ancestry.com/name-origin?surname=Long

[iii] See Endnote #1 above – Forebears.

The Longs of Martin County – Part 3 of 3 – Findings

Howell-Hobbs-Long

After reviewing the 1850 and 1840 Census records for Martin County, North Carolina, I developed a hypothesis that Samuel Aquilla Long is the son of Stephen Long. The Stephen Long household did not exist in Martin County in 1850 but in 1840 consisted of the following:

MALES

  • 10-15   2        Two Unknown Males born 1825-1830.
  • 15-20   1        Unknown Male born 1820-1825
  • 20-30   1        Unknown Male born 1810-1820 (Could be Samuel Aquilla Long)
  • 30-40   1        Unknown Male born 1800-1810
  • 40-50   1        Assumed to be Stephen Long

FEMALES

  • 20-30    1      Unknown Female born 1820-1830.
  • 50-60    1      Apparently Stephen’s wife.

Shipwreck of the Comet.

I then began searching for documents or records that would fit this family in various sources. Immediately, I found a series of articles on Newspapers.Com. According to the articles, Stephen Long owned the schooner, Comet. The Comet had left Turks Island fully loaded with salt and wrecked at North Point of Breakers, near Ocracoke Island. Two of Stephen Long’s sons died in the ship’s sinking along with the Captain. The tragedy of the loss was compounded when the distraught widow of the Captain committed suicide by drowning herself and her two small children.[i]

Wilmington Journal – January 30, 1846

As for Stephen Long’s sons, one article described the two as “promising, interesting youths, in the very morning of Manhood, the pride and hope of their heart-stricken, unfortunate parent.” The two youngest males in the 1840 census would have been between 16 and 21 in 1846. To me, that sounds much like “the very morning of manhood. I searched many places to find their names and have been unsuccessful in finding them. Because they died so young and there was no mention of them having children, I am identifying them simply as:

FNU son of Stephen Long born after 1825 and before 1830; died 6 Jan 1846.

That still leaves three males in the household where one of them could be my wife’s 2nd great-grandfather, Samuel Aquilla Long.

Court Case for Stephen Long

Next, I found an appeal to the North Carolina Supreme Court on Google Books.[ii] The appeal mentions that Stephen Long sued William L. Mizell. Before the case came to the Martin County Superior Court, in June 1849, Stephen Long died. The judge postponed the case until the next session of the court, August 1849. For this session, Edgar A. Long, the executor of Stephen’s estate, was the new petitioner. After the case was heard and decided but before any execution orders were issued, Edgar A. Long died. Who was going to receive the money owed was to be determined by the State Supreme Court in 1851.

It is often the case that the eldest son is the executor of a person’s estate, so I penciled in Edgar A. Long as the oldest son of Stephen Long.

Unknown Male born 1800-1810 – Possibly Edgar A. Long who died in 1849.

The Will of Stephen Long

Now knowing there was an executor for Stephen Long’s estate, I began looking for probate or will for Stephen.

I was able to find a will for Stephen at Ancestry.Com in “North Carolina, Wills and Probate Records, 1665-1998.”[iii]

The will was quite straight forward. My transcription:

Will of Stephen Long

In the name of God Amen! I Stephen Long of the town of Williamston, Martin County being of sound disposing mind and memory do make, ordain and publish this my last will and testament.

1st I desire that all my just debt be paid.

2[nd] I give to my all loved wife, Frerella [Avrella??] Long all my land, negros, and property both real and personal during her natural life.

3rd after my wife death I give and bequeath all my land, negros, and real and personal property to my three sons, Adolphus, Pierce, and John equally to be divided between them.

4th I nominate constitute and appoint my son Adolphus, Long, sole Executor to this my last will and testament in testimony I have documents set my hand and seal the 11th day of August 1843 on the presence of

Wm Woodard
L Whittlesey

Stephen Long (seal)

Conclusion

I’ve learned that Stephen’s three living (in 1843) sons were Adolphus, Pierce, and John. I also learned that Samuel Aquilla Long was not one of  Stephen’s sons. So, it is back to the drawing board.  I didn’t see any other reasonable candidates other than this in the 1840 Census. I know that the 23-year-old Samuel Aquilla Long could have been living anywhere during the 1840 Census, but I’m hoping he was probably living with his parents during the 1830 Census. When I next return to researching this line, I’ll look at the 1830 Census and see what possibilities are there.


Endnotes

[i] Wilmington Journal (Wilmington, NC) – Jan 30, 1846, “Distressing Shipwreck” via Newspapers.com

[ii] Google Books:  North Carolina Reports, Vol. 34 — Cases Argued and Determined in the SUPREME COURT of North Carolina — June Term, 1851 to August Term, 1851 both inclusive by  James Iredell (Volume 12) — Annotated by Walter Clark (2nd anno. Ed.) — Reprinted for the state by E. M. UZZELL & C0. Presses of Mitchel Printing Company, Raleigh, N. C. 1917. https://books.google.com/books?id=19ozAQAAMAAJ.

[iii] North Carolina, Wills and Probate Records, 1665-1998 – Ancestry.com 2

The Longs of Martin County – Part 2 of 3 – The 1840 Census

Census Sunday
Howell-Hobbs-Long

The parents of my wife’s 2nd great-grandfather, Samuel Aquilla Long, are unknown. Some researchers indicate that his father’s name is John, however, I can find no source for that suggestion.  FamilySearch and Ancestry have no other suggestions nor hints about his family. Previously, I looked at the Longs of Martin County in the 1850 Census. In this posting, I continue my research for Samuel and his parents in the 1840 Census.

Martin County, NC

Samuel was born about 1817 in Martin County, North Carolina.  He married Martha Ann Bryan in 1844.  Because that, I suspect he was enumerated in the 1840 Census as a single 23-year-old living with his parent or parents.

1840 Census

The 1840 Census does not provide the names of individuals in a household; it only provides the name of the head of the household. The 1840 Census provides the names of four heads of households in Martin County, North Carolina; Joshua Long, Stephen Long, Gracey Long, and W. B. Long. Could any of these households include Samuel?

The Joshua Long Household[i]

 The Joshua Long 1840 Census household is clearly the same household as existed in 1850. All of the children in the 1850 Census are apparent in the 1840 Census.

  • James, & A.I. Long appear to be there as males born between 1830-1835
  • William appears to be a male born between 1825 and 1830.
  • John also appears to be enumerated as a male born between 1820 to 1825.

There is another male, unknown born between 1820 and 1825 who was not with the family during the 1850 Census. Samuel would have been 23 during the 1840 Census, so it is unlikely for him to be that unknown individual.

The Stephen Long Household[ii]

The Stephen Long Household includes 8 people, six males. Stephen is obviously one of the males, leaving five unknown males. One of them is in the 20 to 30-year-old range; Samuel would have been 23-years-old in 1840 so this is a possible match.

MALES

  • 10-15   2        Two Unknown Males born 1825-1830.
  • 15-20   1        Unknown Male born 1820-1825
  • 20-30   1        Unknown Male born 1810-1820 – (Samuel Aquilla Long?)
  • 30-40   1        Unknown Male born 1800-1810
  • 40-50   1        Apparently Stephen Long

FEMALES

  • 20-30    1   Unknown Female born 1820-1830.
  • 50-60    1   Apparently Stephen’s wife.

The ages don’t appear to be quite right for the Stephen Long household to be a traditional family. Rather, I suspect that there may be a sibling and/or a sibling’s spouse living with the household.

The Gracey Long Household[iii]

The Gracey Long household consists of Gracey and two young females. Samuel could not have been a member of that family.

The W. B. Long “Household”[iv]

The W. B. Long household only consists of the 20 to 30-year-old William[v]. Additionally, he lives next to Gracey and looks like he might be an adult child of Gracey’s.

Conclusion

If Samuel Aquilla Long was born in 1816-1817 and if he was enumerated in Martin County during the 1840 Census, then the only entry that fits him is to be in the household of Stephen Long in 1840.  As such, I will tentatively identify his father as Stephen Long.

Next, I’ll see what other records I can find in the 1840-1850 time period relating to the Longs of Martin County and see how they connect this family.



ENDNOTES

[i] “United States Census, 1840,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHYZ-B6C – 16 August 2017), Joshua Long, District 1, Martin, North Carolina, United States; citing p. 350, NARA microfilm publication M704, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 365; FHL microfilm 18,095.

[ii] “United States Census, 1840,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHYZ-BJD – 16 August 2017), Stephen Long, Williamston Township, Martin, North Carolina, United States; citing p. 362, NARA microfilm publication M704, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 365; FHL microfilm 18,095.

[iii] “United States Census, 1840,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHYZ-BJD – 16 August 2017), Stephen Long, Williamston Township, Martin, North Carolina, United States; citing p. 362, NARA microfilm publication M704, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 365; FHL microfilm 18,095.

[iv] Ibid.

[v] Although the indexer indicated the name of this individual was W. B. Long, my interpretation of the entry is that the “W” has a superscripted “m” following it, suggesting his name as William B. Long.

The Longs of Martin County – Part 1 of 3 – The 1850 Census

Howell-Hobbs-Long
Census Sunday

The parents of my wife’s 2nd great-grandfather, Samuel Aquilla Long, are unknown. Some researchers indicate that his father’s name is John. However, I can find no source for that suggestion.  FamilySearch and Ancestry have no other suggestions nor hints about his family. Without any clues to his parents, I decided to do a quick locational surname study and see what I can find.

What I think I know

Martin County, NC

Samuel was born about 1817 in Martin County, North Carolina.  He married Martha Ann Bryan in 1844 and appeared in the 1850 Census living in Martin County.  Because of that, I suspect he was enumerated in the earlier censuses 1820-1840, which only shows the name of the head of the household.

The 1850 Census, which provides the names of individuals in a household, although not relationships, is a good place to begin.

1850 Census

The Joshua Long household appears to be a traditional family, parents and six children. His is a new household to me. I do not know how they are related, so I entered them as an unrelated household with estimated birth years,

Joshua Long Household[i]

Household Role Sex Age Birthplace
Joshua Long M 59 North Carolina
Nancy Long F 50 North Carolina
John Long M 25 North Carolina
Wm Long M 24 North Carolina
James Long M 18 North Carolina
A. I. Long M 16 North Carolina
Mary I Long F 13 North Carolina
Ann P Long F 10 North Carolina

The Sam C A Long (Samuel A. Long) household appears to be a traditional family, parents and four children.  Samuel is my wife’s 2nd Great-Grandfather’s household in 1850. I confirmed all entries were in my database already. Approximate Birth Year, Birthplace, and Residence on 1 June 1850.

Samuel Long Household[ii]

Household Role Sex Age Birthplace
Sam C A Long[iii] M 33 North Carolina
Ann Long F 27
John Long M 9
Jas Long M 7
Wm Long M 5
May Long F 2

(Note: Ditto marks were not entered on this page; I assumed that the Birthplace was North Carolina for the other members of the household.)

William Long – Next Door to Samuel Long[iv]

Next door to Samuel Long is William Long. Samuel is dwelling 638 and Family 503. William is dwelling 639 and family 504.  William is 28 years old and owns the property valued at $1300. By the census, within the same family unit are three additional dwellings with the following occupants.

  • 660 Thos (Thomas) Parmer (age 65)
  • 661 George Rawls (Age 33) apparently with wife Gatsy, and 4 children.
  • 662 Elizabeth Johnson (age 60) with apparently three adult children.

Certainly, it is likely that William Long is related to Samuel Long. With Samuel being 33 and William being 28, I guess that they are probably brothers or 1st cousins.  The people in the three additional dwellings are also possibly related. But for now, I’ll enter William Long as unrelated into my system but leave a note about the other individuals in his file.

Living with Sheriff Mooring[v]

Finally, there is the household of A. S. Mooring. He is the 33-year-old Sherriff. His household, #29, consists of 14 people. Six of the people are Moorings and appear to be the Sheriff, his wife, and four children. Besides them, there are three females, Mary A C Long, A. E. Long, and Cindarilla Whitaker. Finally, there are five males in their 20s and 30s. Mary A. C. Long is 30 and A E Long is 12.

Next, I’ll look at the 1840 Census and see if I can place some of these individuals into households….



ENDNOTES

[i] “United States Census, 1850,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4B8-HFS – 12 April 2016), Household of Joshua Long, Martin county, Martin, North Carolina, United States; citing family 624, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

[ii] “United States Census, 1850,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4B8-5QZ – 12 April 2016), May Long in household of Sam C A Long, Martin county, Martin, North Carolina, United States; citing family 503, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

[iii] My reading of the census entry is that it says “Sam’l” which was indexed as “Sam C.”

[iv] “United States Census, 1850,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4B8-5QG 12 April 2016), William Long, Martin county, Martin, North Carolina, United States; citing family 504, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

[v] “United States Census, 1850,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4B8-MT212  April 2016), Mary A C Long in household of A S Mooring, Martin county, Martin, North Carolina, United States; citing family 29, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

The Hamilton Primitive Baptist Church

Howell/Hobbs/Long

As so often occurs, I get behind. Last summer I received an email from Carrie MC about the Hamilton Primitive Baptist Church. She had fresh information about the church’s status and some photos of the building that I haven’t had a chance to review, catalog, and incorporate into my genealogical files until now.  I had mentioned the church in my biographical sketch of Annie Deborah Long Hobbs, which she read. Then she contacted me as a person interested in Hamilton history and the Long family. My wife’s great-grandmother Annie Long was probably a church member when the church was built about 1888 and Annie remained friends with the people there even after she and her husband, James Ashley Hobbs, moved 13 miles away to Williamston.

Annie’s brother, Dr. Benjamin Long, built a house in Hamilton about 1885 and the church was built next to it, on Dr. Long’s property, about 1888, on Long Street. After the minister of the church died in 1913, Dr. Edgar Long (Dr. Benjamin Long’s son) sold the church to the Hamilton Colored Disciples. In 1939, the building was moved a few blocks away to South Street.[i]

Hamilton (NC) Primitive Baptist Church – Photo by Carrie MC

In 2004, Isabel Bernfeld of Hamilton purchased the church with the hope to restore the building.[ii] She apparently did some work. After her death, the building was purchased in 2016 by Carrie MC. Carrie hopes to return the church to its original location and hopes to restore the building. She and I have been in contact and she has let me know about some of the work that has been done including major tree trimming to reduce the risk of tree damage. She also sent a few photos of the church.[iii] The original louvered tower has been replaced with a tower with two louvered panels on each side instead of the original three louvers panels on each side.

It is so nice to see historic buildings restored. These old buildings are often places that had significant importance to our ancestors. They are just so precious to our history.

Finally, I’d like to mention, there is an interesting blog, “Generations Ago Blog” written by Dan Leigh, who is a 3rd cousin to Mary-Alice (Grandson of Edgar Miller Long). His article, “A Doctor in the Family”, is a beautiful description of his family line and what he learned at the Martin County Historical Society and about country doctors during the early 20th century.


Endnotes:

[i] Boykin, Jacqueline R. 2006. Martin County’s historic churches: National Register and National Historic District churches. Williamston, N.C.: Martin County Historical Society. 
[ii] Ibid.
[iii] Email correspondence between Carrie MC and Don Taylor 30 July 2018. [Don’s files – Hamilton Primitive Baptist Church.