Adair Project – Ella E. (Mitchell) Adair

Ancestor Bio – Ella E (Mitchell)Adair

52 Ancestors – Week 190

By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.This week I look at Ella E. Mitchell. As is so often the case with women ancestors, her life events are defined by her husband and her children. We know she had at least seven children, five of whom lived to adulthood. She was a sharecropper’s wife and lived a simple life. She was born in Georgia, lived her entire life in Georgia, probably entirely in Paulding County. She died fairly young at the age of 49.

 

Adair Project 2017 – Ancestor AH-09

List of Grandparents

  • Grandfather: Elmer Dewey Adair
  • 1st Great-grandmother: Ella E. Mitchell

 

Ella E (Mitchell) Adair (1887-1936)

I believe that Ella E. Mitchell was born in 1887.  I don’t normally consider an individual’s grave marker as certain, however, in this case, the 1910 Census, which is the census closest to her birth indicated that she was 22 suggesting a birth between 16 April 1887 and 15 April 1888.  The 1920 Census was way wrong saying she was 38 years old (born about 1881 or 1882). The 1930 Census indicated she had only aged three years since 1920, she was 41 (born about 1888 or 1889).

I have not been successful determining who her parents or siblings were. I have searched newspapers (Newspapers, Newspaper Archives, Genealogy Bank, and Chronicling America) to no avail. I believe I will next need to try a surname focus study for Mitchell in Paulding County, Georgia and see if I can determine a potential family.

Marriage

The first record showing Ella is her marriage license and certificate where she married Allen William Adair on 18 April 1904 in a ceremony performed by B. H. Owen, J.P. in Paulding County Georgia.[i]

Adult

Tragedy struck the young couple quickly. The 1910 Census indicates that Ella had two children, one of whom was living.  We know that Floyd was born on 21 Apr 1909. So, and unknown infant must have been born and died, probably between Allen and Ella’s marriage in 1904 and the census date (15 April 1910).[ii]

1910 Census – The family consisted of Allen who was a farmer renting his farm near Humphrey, Paulding County Georgia. Ella and one-year-old Floyd were with him. Neither Allen nor Ella could read and write.  Living with them was a 20-year-old boarder from Alabama named Hollis Ware. They were living in Humphrey, Paulding County Georgia.[iii]

Search Military Records - Fold31918 – Ella was identified as Allen’s wife when he registered for the draft. They were living on R.F.D. 1, Dallas, Paulding County.[iv]

1920 Census – The family had grown by 1920.[v] 

  • Floyd was still at home and attending school.  He is identified as being able to read and write, the first in the family.
  • Elmer was born in 1912 and was also attending school.
  • Lola was born 14 Oct 1914 in Dallas, Paulding County, Georgia.
  • Paul was born 25 Aug 1918 also in Paulding County.

1923 – Tragedy struck again with the death of another infant child. Ella had twins, was named Mary Lee that lived, the other twin died. It is not clear how long the second twin lived.

1930 Census – The census record shows that Allen and Ella have three of their children still living with them. They are living on a farm on Villa Ricca Road, Dallas, GA. Sadly, 17-year-old Elmer is working as a farm laborer and is not attending school. He is also identified as unable to read and write. His brother, 11-year-old Paul, is attending school and can read and write. Six-year-old Mary is not attending school.[vi]

Death

Marker - Allen William Adair
Marker – Ella M [Mitchell] – Allen William Adair
Ella Mitchell died in 1936, presumably in Paulding County, Georgia.  She is buried at Bethany Christian Church Cemetery, Dallas, Paulding County, Georgia.[vii]

Further Actions / Follow-up

  • Search records searching for Ella’s actual birth date.
  • Search records searching for Ella’s actual death date.
  • Determine Ella’s parents (Do a surname study of Mitchells in Paulding County). Georgia.)


Endnotes

[i] Georgia, County Marriages, 1785-1950, Family Search, Allen Adair – Ella Mitchell – 18 April 1904. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KXVF-7XP.
[ii] 1910 Census (NARA), Family Search, Allen Adair – Humphrey, Paulding, Georgia ED 121, Page 10B, Line 75. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MLLS-FJM.
[iii] Ibid.
[iv] United States World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 (NARA), Family Search, Allen William Adair – Georgia Paulding County; A-Z. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KZZJ-FMK.
[v] 1920 Census, Family Search, 1920 Census – Allen [Adair] Adain, Cains, Paulding, Georgia, United States; citing ED 143, sheet 5A, line 5, family 74. Accessed 19 August 2017. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MJXS-4VR.
[vi] 1930 Census, Family Search, Allen Adair – Dallas, Paulding, Georgia, ED 8, Sheet 3A, Line 3. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:3HF1-WZM.
[vii] Find a Grave, Find a Grave, Ella [Mitchell] Adair – Memorial #45685515. https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=45685515.

1895 Minnesota Census – Jessie & Nancy Barnett

Census Sunday

Brown/Montran
Mannin

Census records are the mainstay of genealogical research.  One of my favorite census records is the 1895 Minnesota State Census.  Not only does it provide much of the information you would expect in a Census – Name, Age, Sex, Race, Place of Birth, and Occupation – it provides information about how long males over 21 have been in the state, how long they have been in the Enumeration District, and if they were a soldier or sailor in the War of Rebellion (Civil War).

When I learned my new cousin (See: Keep Trees Wide, Not Deep) was a descendant of Jessie M. and Nancy A (Mannin) Barnett, I wanted to add a bit more about them and their children into my tree information.

1895 Minnesota Census. Cass County  - Jesse Barnett
1895 Minnesota Census. Cass County – Jesse Barnett

Sure enough.  I learned Jessie (and presumably the entire family) moved to Minnesota about March 1883 (12 years and 2 Months before the 1 June 1895 Census) and moved to May Township (Township 134, Range 31) about March 1886 (9 years and 2 months before the Census.) Sarah being born in Minnesota and Albert being born in Kentucky confirms the arrival in Minnesota date. I also learned that Jessie was a soldier in the War of Rebellion. I also received confirmation about several of the children’s dates and places of birth. Finally, the census showed one child, John M. Barnett, whom I had no record of before. The 1895 Census does not provide relationships; however, it is a fairly safe bet that John M was the son of Jesse and Nancy. I tentatively added him to my listing of children and will work to confirm the relationship later.

My transcription notes:

1895 Minnesota Census – Jessie Barnett, Cass County[i]

Enumeration Date was 1 June 1895.

Township 134, Range 31 (May Township)

  • Name                           Age      Born Res. St/ED    Occ.   Mos.     War 
  • Barnett, Jessie M.        46        KY       12, 2; 9, 2,       Farmer 12,       Soldier
  • Barnett, Nancy A.         46        KY
  • Barnett, Albert M          14        KY
  • Barnett, Sarah M.         12        MN
  • Barnett, Martin W         9         MN
  • Barnett, John M.      7         MN
  • Barnett, Jessie W          4          MN

Endnotes

[i] “Minnesota State Census, 1895,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MQ6T-52G : 26 November 2014), Jessie M Barnett, Township 134N, Range 31W, Cass, Minnesota; citing p. 3, line 21, State Library and Records Service, St.Paul; FHL microfilm 565,765.

———-  DISCLAIMER  ———-
TTT_Ancestry_logo

Keep Trees Wide, Not Deep – Example: Mannin/Barnett

Brown-Montran Research
DNA Research

Mannin/Manning/Brown

During the last meeting of the Maine Genealogical DNA Interest Group, someone asked if it is better to have a tree that is deep or a tree that is wide. I mentioned that, for autosomal DNA test matches, a wide tree is best.  The sheer number of potential 5th and 6th cousins is daunting. But, more importantly, the likelihood of your sharing DNA with a 4th cousin is only 69% and the likelihood of sharing DNA with a 5th cousin is only 30%.[i] Consequently, knowing your 10th great grandparents is of little use in matching DNA cousins.  (Consequently, knowing your 10th great grandparents is of little use in matching DNA cousins. There are two exceptions to this, Y-DNA tree (paternal only) is useful for connecting trees on a Y-DNA match.  Also, X-DNA can provide a similar usefulness.)

23 & Me Shared Matches
23 & Me: Shared Matches

The importance of having a wide tree was exemplified recently.  I was contacted through 23 and Me by a, potentially, 2nd to 4th cousin (I’ll call B.J.) I took a look at the match using 23 & Me‘s new She and my aunt Barbara shared 88cM across five segments. My mother shared 50cM across two segments; interestingly enough, I also shared 50cM across two segments. Looking at what segments all four of us share is an excellent example of how sticky DNA segments are.  All three of us shared the same sticky chunk of DNA.

Screen Shot - Chromosome 3 comparison
Screen Shot – 23 & Me – Chromosome 3 comparison showing sticky clump shared among all of us.

 

 

 

We exchanged basic tree information, she mentioned her ancestors were a Mannin and a Barnett. When she said that, I knew we were related and I was pretty sure I knew exactly how.  Nancy Ann Mannin married Jessie Monroe Barnett about 1867 in Kentucky. They later moved to Minnesota and settled May Township in Cass County, Minnesota.

A couple more email exchanges and I learned that B.J. and my Aunt Barbara were third cousins their common ancestor was Enoch Mannin. Enoch was one of those pivotal people in my genealogical research and I knew a lot about him and his descendants. I even had B.J.’s mother (but not her father nor her) in my family tree records.

Thanks to 23 and Me for providing the tools to connect with another cousin.

———-  DISCLAIMER  ———-

I have tested my mother, my aunt, and myself with 23 and Me – Have you?


Endnotes:

[i] Internet: DNA Land – “Face it: DNA cannot find all your relatives” https://medium.com/@dl1dl1/face-it-dna-cannot-find-all-your-relatives-f68089b8e1e9#.1yar6d4d6

The 42nd: Shell Shelters, Headquarters, and In the Trenches.

Over There

This Veterans Day, like most Veterans Days, I honor my veteran ancestors. This day was originally known as Armistice Day because an armistice – the cessation of hostilities – went into effect on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918.

Original 42nd Division Rainbow Patch.
Original 42nd Division Rainbow Patch.

Today, I also take a look at the men of the Forty-Second Infantry Division, U.S.A. Known as the “Rainbow Division,” Douglas MacArthur suggested its formation from multiple states that would “stretch over the whole country like a rainbow.” The division was created in 1917 from 26 states, including Maine, and was one of the first divisions of the American Expeditionary Force to go to Europe. Douglas MacArthur was promoted to Colonel as the Division’s Chief of Staff.

The photo below is of some of the Forty-Second Division soldiers hanging out at a shell shelter.  Two of the men are sleeping, one on the cold ground, the other on what looks to be a really uncomfortable ridge of the shell. However, it is the expressions of the other soldiers that makes me wonder.  They are all looking at something off to their left. Two of the men have odd smiles on their faces.  I wonder what they are seeing. Something definitely interesting.

Shell Shelters in use by men of the Forty-Second Division, U. S. A.

Next, we see a commander’s post.  It is unclear if this with the 42nd Division’s command post during the Champagne-Marne campaign (15–18 July 1918) or sometime before that.

A commander’s Post of the Forty-Second Division.

Finally, the New York Times gives us a glimpse of the 42nd in the trenches.  Crowded, guns at the ready, bayonets affixed. Ready for combat.

In the Forty-Second Division’s Front Trenches
From March until July, 1918, the Germans were losing about 20,000 soldiers a month on the Western Front. Total causalities were well over 100,000 soldiers a month during the same period. Four months after this picture, the armistice was signed and the bloodiest war in European history (at that time) was over.

Yes, today is a day to remember our veterans and thank them for their service. But it is also a day to reflect upon the “war to end all wars.” As a Vietnam veteran, I wish we could just find a way to only create peacetime veterans and not have any wars. Deterrence is better than battle.

Why I’ll never do business with MyHeritage again.

It is seldom that a company angers me enough that I say, “I’ll NEVER, NEVER EVER, do business with that company again.” MyHeritage has successfully achieved that status with me.

I was enticed to use MyHeritage when 23 and Me eliminated their own ancestry trees and transferred them to MyHeritage. My tree was transferred to MyHeritage and I eventually subscribed to them because of 23 and Me’s endorsement. I didn’t find their service particularly useful and decided to drop them.

Rant On

First of all, it seems that every responsible company I do business with sends a notification a week or two before an automatic renewal takes effect. On rare occasions, when a company doesn’t send such a notification, I have always been able to call them the following business day, have the automatic renewal canceled, and have the money refunded. Not so with MyHeritage.

screen-shot-2016-10-23-at-6-48-17-am-copyA few months ago I had gone onto Pay Pal and canceled my automatic renewal. I thought that I was done. But when I was charged, I checked Pay Pal and found there were two entries for MyHeritage.  The first one I had canceled. But there was a second entry.  It had an expiration date of Dec 13, 1901.  I had no idea that I had to cancel that too.  I thought, no problem, I’ll just call them, they’ll refund the money, and we’ll be square – No harm, no foul.

I was wrong. I explained I hadn’t used the service in months. I explained that I canceled one service. I explained that I didn’t realize I need to cancel a service that had an expiration date of 1901, to no avail.  After talking at length with a “customer service representative” the bottom line was, “We typically don’t refund renewal fees.” Finally, I asked to speak with a supervisor.

I waited several minutes. Finally, the same customer service representative came back. I couldn’t speak with his supervisor, but his supervisor said I could have half my money back and he’d allow the annual subscription to remain active for the year. Certainly, I felt disrespected by the supervisor who wouldn’t even speak with me. An unhappy customer with a problem deserves being spoken to; that is why supervisors usually have the flexibility to go outside standard protocols.

MyHeritage renewal canceled
Both entries now canceled

The good news is that I did receive half of my money back ($59.40). The bad news is that I paid half-price for a subscription that don’t want and I’ll never, never ever, use.

I believe Pay Pal is also culpable. Further investigation revealed that MyHeritage’s automatic subscriptions do expire in 80 years.  Had Pay Pal displayed an expiration date of Dec 13, 2095, instead of Dec 13, 1901, I would not have missed that I needed to cancel that also,

There are only a handful of companies that I’ll never do business with. Congratulations to MyHeritage, you have made my list.

Rant Off

Could MyHeritage come off my list? Sure; but, they would need to take the next step in making this former customer happy.  Have you had problems with MyHeritage and their renewal process?  If so, feel free to comment below. I’ll publish some of the better comments.