Montrans in the News – Maronites’ Society

Montran Monday
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.

This week for Montran Monday[i], I found two articles from The Chat (Brooklyn, New York). They both appeared to relate to Montrans that lived in Brooklyn. Neither Mr. Montran nor his wife, May, are a likely fit into my Montran Line.

The Chat (Brooklyn, New York) dated 5 December 1908, Page 27. This article is a brief mention that Mr. and Mrs. Montran and daughter attended a 25th wedding anniversary celebration of Mr. and Mrs. Martin Seibert.

The Chat (Brooklyn, New York) dated 30 May 1925, Page 31. This article is a society page paragraph in which Mrs. May Montran attended a meeting of the Maronites’ Society[ii] along with more than 500 Syrians. 

Sources:

  • The Chat (Brooklyn, New York) Sat, Dec 5, 1908, · Page 27 – Downloaded on July 26, 2019, via Newspapers.com.

The Chat (Brooklyn, New York) · Sat, May 30, 1925, · Page 31 – Downloaded on July 26, 2019, via Newspapers.com



ENDNOTES

[i] Montran Monday – My grandmother’s father was John Montran. She used the surname, as a young child and again when she began in show business. The name is uncommon and most of the Montrans I see in the newspapers are my grandmother during her early vaudeville career. However, with the constant flow of newly digitized material, I often learn of new articles which contain the Montran name. I pay attention to the finding and try to determine a possible relationship of any Montrans to Donna’s father, John Montran.

[ii] Maronites are a Christian group whose members adhere to the Syriac Maronite Church.  A mass emigration from Lebanon and Syria to the Americas occurred in the early 20th century due to famine, blockades, and World War I that resulted in between one-third to one-half of the population. Source: Internet: Wikipedia: Maronites – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maronites

 

Cross-Country Travels

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun
My Life
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.The Weekly Genealogist, produced by NEHGS, regularly has a survey question designed to make you think about your ancestors’ lives. They recently had a question asking if you or your ancestors traveled “across the country” not by airplane. In this case, “across the country” was a trip of more than 1500 miles.

Randy Seaver, in his blog, Genea-Musing, suggested taking that idea, cross country trips, and write about it.[i] I thought about the question and realized that with Detroit to Portland, Oregon, is over 2300 miles, my grandmother, mother, and I have all have had such travels, several times.

My Cross-Country Trips

I’ve made trips across the country several times.

1964 Ford Falcon Estate pic2
1964 Ford Falcon like I traveled in in 1969.
When I was in the service, (Christmas 1969) three of us drove a Ford Falcon station wagon from San Francisco to Minneapolis. One person drove, one sat in the passenger seat, and one person slept in the back. Each person would rotate positions every three hours. We only stopped for gas and made the 2000 mile trip in less than 34 hours.

My second cross country trip was when I left Oregon to go to training in Vallejo, California, in 1972. After training, we knew I was heading to a ship at sea, so my wife and son moved from Oregon to Minneapolis. I drove Mary (my first wife), and our son Matt, the 1600 miles back to Minnesota, where they lived during my time at school. I flew from Minneapolis to San Francisco to training and again to the Philippines for my first cruise aboard the USS Kitty Hawk.

The next cross-country trip was when I moved Mary-Alice from her home in Maine to Minneapolis. Just a little over 1500 miles, it only barely qualified for this list. That trip was in her Dodge Caravan, loaded to the top with stuff. We arrived in Minneapolis just after the “Great Halloween Blizzard of 1991.” Before I had told Mary-Alice that Minnesota was colder than Maine, but we didn’t get as much snow. When we got to Minnesota, Interstate 94 was two ruts heading up out of the Saint Croix river valley because of the 28 inches of snow the Twin Cities had received. She gave me that look, that said, “We never had this much snow in Maine in October.”

The Mojave Desert in Bloom – Photo by Geoff Stocker.

In 1998, Mary-Alice and I moved to Long Beach, California (about 1900 miles). I drove the car and Mary-Alice drove her van. We kept in contact with little radios. When we got to the Mohave Desert, she kept asking where the desert was. We drove through it during a “once-in-a-century” flower bloom. It was gorgeous, entire hillsides yellow with flowers.

In 2000, Mary-Alice and I moved from Long Beach to Boston, Massachusetts. Our van was over-loaded with stuff and relatively old, so I was afraid to try the shorter 3000-mile northern route because of the mountains on the way. So, we took the 3200 mile-route through Phoenix, El Paso, and Dallas. That was a brutal trip. We stopped at a weird motel in Tennessee and had a difficult time finding our room. Little did we know that the 200 rooms were downstairs from the 100 rooms.

I made the trip between Minneapolis and Portland, Oregon, as an infant, twice with my mother. I don’t remember either trip and rely only upon my mother’s telling of the stories.

My Mother’s Cross-Country Trips.

Back in 1950, my mother got a job with an outfit that sold magazines door to door. They had a crew of kids, my mother was 18, and moved city to city. I know they started in Detroit and ended in Portland, Oregon, in just a few months, stopping at cities and towns all along the way. I still wasn’t born yet but was born a few weeks after her arrival in Portland.

In 1953, my mother was pregnant with my sister, Glennis. Mom like the hospital I was born in and decided she wanted her second child to be born in the same hospital. She hitch-hiked from Minneapolis to Portland, Oregon (1700 miles) with 3-year-old me. Wow—What a trip that must have been for her.

My mom and Budgar traveled between Minneapolis and Phoenix (over 1600 miles) many times.

On one occasion she traveled between Phoenix and Minneapolis by herself and then continued with me to Clarksburg, West Virginia (about 2600 miles in total).

My Grandmother, Donna

My Grandmother was a fantastic traveler. She was born in Albion, Michigan and lived there until about 1914 when she went to California to be one of Max Sennett’s Bathing Beauties and to be in the movie, “Birth of a Nation.”

She traveled from California to Massachusetts in 1915 and lived in the Boston area for a few years.

In 1919, Donna traveled from New York to Decatur, Illinois to join the cast of “Chin Chin.” She then toured with the show to Nebraska, Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Idaho, Oregon, British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Indiana, Michigan, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Maryland, Vermont, Connecticut, and Massachusetts before the show ended.

Known locations Donna was at during the “Chin Chin” Tour.

In 1922 & 1923, “Donna Darling and Company” went on the road. They started in New York and went to Pennsylvania, Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Wisconsin, North Carolina, South Carolina, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Arkansas.

In 1924, Donna went on another tour heading west from New York to include Montana, Oregon, and California with stops all over in between.

In 1926, Donna had another tour heading west from New York and including Texas, Arizona, California, Oregon, Washington, Montana, Wisconsin, Michigan.

In 1927, Donna had another tour heading south from New York and across to New Orleans and back.

During her travels, virtually all of the trips were via train. A typical day, she’d board the first train out of a city, take the train with her crew, cast, and sets to another town, typically 2 to 4 hours away. The crew would unload and install the sets at the theater. She would then do a show or two that day. After the show, they’d head to a hotel for the night then head out again with the first train to another town. Sometimes, on longer travels, I’m sure they’d sleep on the train while heading to the next city. She had a train stuck in the snow in Nebraska for several days, a trestle washed out in Arizona (where they needed to carry their scenery past the wash-out on their backs), and had an earthquake break the tracks in California.

As I get more and more of her vaudeville career documented, I’ll create maps showing her travels and some of her many travel challenges.

Others

Oxen Team pulling covered wagon – Photo by Don Harrison (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

I don’t know anything about my biological father’s life travels, nor do I know about his parents’ travels. I know that grandpa Dick was in the service and probably traveled cross country with that. He served in Panama, so I’m sure he at least traveled from Minnesota to the Gulf (or a coast) as a minimum. My great-grandmother Mary (Manning) Brown never traveled 1500 miles (to my knowledge), but she did travel the 1000 miles, from Kentucky to Minnesota, by oxen-driven wagon. That trip was with her grandparents, Enoch & Minerva (Toliver) Mannin.  I think a 1000 miles trip by oxen-driven wagon is much tougher than twice that distance by train or automobile, so it should count.

ENDNOTES

[i] Internet: Genea-Musings by Randy Seaver – 27 July 2019 – “Saturday Night Genealogy Fun – Ancestors Trans-Continental Travel (not by Airplane)

 

Donna Darling Collection – Part 51

Treasure Chest Thursday
Vaudeville

By Don Taylor

For this week’s Treasure Chest Tuesday, I’m looking at three clippings from the Donna Darling Collection.

The first article is a short paragraph about “Dancing Girls at Orpheum”

DANCING GIRLS AT ORPHEUM

Donna Darling and her dancing girls headline the Orpheum bill for the first half of the week. “Songs and Steps” is the title of Donna’s act.

The Golden Bird, a trained canary….

Interesting. I had never heard of that act, and there are so many Orpheum theatres, it is impossible to know where, or even when, this show was playing.

Next, is an ad for the Orpheum Theatre with The Golden Bird headlining the ad with Donna Darling and Girls being the finale act. Donna’s show is billed as “The Musical Comedy Beauty Assisted by a Bevy of Bewitching Enchantresses in Songs and Steps.” I’ve seen “Donna Darling and Girls” before. She began that show sometime between August and September 1924. The movie Another Scandal was released in June 1924, so the show had to have been after that.

Finally, a third article for the show provides all of the remaining desired information. It was the Orpheum Theatre, Oklahoma City, Okla., for the week of September 6th (Sunday through Wednesday). The program played Sunday thru Wednesday – September 6th thru September 9th 1925.

Key features:

  • The venue was the Orpheum Theatre in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. It is “The World’s Best Vaudeville”
  • The show was the “Donna Darling and Girls, The Musical Comedy Beauty in Songs in “Songs and Steps”
  • Also on the Bill
    • Fox News “Modern Whaling” an Educational.
    • “Another Scandal” featuring Lois Wilson and an all star cast.
    • Althea Lucas and Co. in “An Artistic Triumph.”
    • Chad and Monte Huber, Late of So Long Letty” co. in “Dance Divertisements.”
    • THE GOLDEN BIRD, The Canary of Almost Human Intelligence, presented by LORRAINE EVON, The Charming Violinist.
    • Pat Barrett and Nora Cunneen in “Looking for Fun.”

Conclusion

My schedule of Donna’s shows had a huge gap before this clipping. She played July 26th in Decatur Illinois and September 20th in Sedalia, Missouri. Now, it appears that she did a Great Plains tour that summer.

September 6th thru September 9th 1925 – Orpheum Theatre, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma – Donna Darling and Girls.

Sources

Donna Darling Collection – Image DSCN1415.

Ancestor Sketch – Emily Maples Hendricks Scott

Roberts-Scott-Hendricks
By Don Taylor

My research into Emily Hendricks was able to provide the names of her parents, Vaden Hendricks and his wife Sylvania Brown, whom I’ve added to my Roberts-Barnes tree. Now we know where 2nd great-grandfather, Samuel Vaden Scott, got his middle name. Tracing Emily through the 1850 and back to the 1840 Census records was a bit difficult (See Emily Hendricks in the 1840 & 1850 Censuses), but I made it through.

As is common with families at this time, the spelling of the surname is fluid. I prefer Hendricks; however, Hendrix is occasionally used. I typically use the surname as written in the record I am using/citing.

Roberts-Barnes – Ancestor #37

List of Grandparents

  • Grandfather: Bert Allen Roberts(1903-1949)
  • 1st Great-grandmother: Clora Dell ScottRoberts Adams (1883-1945)
  • 2nd Great-grandfather: Samuel Vaden Scott(1862-1931)
  • 3rd Great-grandmother: Emily Maples Hendricks (1836-1878)
  • 4th Great-grandfather: Vaden Hendricks (c. 1805-bef. Jun 1850)

Emily Maples Hendricks Scott (1836-1878)

Birth

TUBS [CC BY-SA 3.0)
Emily Maples Hendricks was born on 22 October 1836 in Kentucky. She was the second of four children of Vaden and Sylvania (Brown) Hendricks. Nineteen Thirty-Six was same year that Arkansas became a state and the Alamo fell in the siege of Mexican forces lead by General Antonio López de Santa Anna.

Childhood

She apparently had two older brothers. One, whose name is still unknown appears in the 1840 Census as a male aged 10 to 15. He doesn’t appear with the family in the 1850 Census and is presumed to have had a family of his own.

Her older brother, Willian, was about five years older than her.

Her first younger sister, Nancy, was born about 1839 in Kentucky.

About 1839 or 1840, the Hendricks family moved from Kentucky to St. Clair County, Illinois.

St. Clair County was growing by leaps and bounds. Between 1830 and 1840, the county nearly doubled in population.

1840

1840 Census – Baden Hendrix Household

<5 5-10 10-15 15-20 20-30 30-40 40 to >100
Males 1 1 1 All Blank
Females 2 1 All Blank

One more sister, Mary, was born in 1841, after the family moved to St Clair County, Illinois.[i]

1850

The 1850 Census suggests that her father has died or has abandoned the family. Her mother, Sylvania, is the only adult in the household in Washington Co., Illinois. Living with them are Emily’s two younger sisters and one of her older brothers, William.

Household                          Sex  Age  Birthplace
Sylvania Hendricks             F       42     Kentucky
William Hendricks              M      19     Kentucky
Emily Hendricks                  F        15     Kentucky
Nancy E Hendricks             F        11      Kentucky
Mary J Hendricks                F        9       Illinois

Marriage

I believe that Emily married William Hunt Scott on 12 September 1856 in Washington County, Illinois.

Children of William and Emily (Hendricks) Scott

Child Birthdate Birthplace (all Illinois)
Viola S Scott Feb or Mar 1860 Washington Co.
Samuel Vaden Scott 23 Aug 1863 Washington Co.
Francis Perry Scott 25 Mar 1870 St. Clair Co.
William Alonzo Scott 03 Oct 1871 St. Clair Co.

Adulthood

The 1860 Census shows William and Emily living in Washington County with “V” (Viola). Of interest is that above them on the census, (probably next door) are William’s parents, Samuel and Elizabeth and many of their children.

The 1870 Census shows William and Emily. The household consists of William, Emily, Viola, Sam, and Francis. I believe there is an error in that particular census as it reports Emily as being 23 (when she was 33).  Not a big error but noted.

Death & Burial

Find a Grave Marker

On October 27, 1878, Emily died in Franklin County, Illinois. She was buried at the Hammond Cemetery, Sesser, Franklin County, Illinois.

 

 

Events by Location

St. Clair County, Illinois Washington County, Illinois
  • Kentucky – 1936-1839 – Birth
  • Clair County, Illinois – 1840-c.1849– Residence
  • Clair County, Illinois – 1870-1878 – Birth of Francis Perry Scott, Residence, and William Alonzo Scott, death and burial.
  • Washington County, Illinois – 1850-1860 – Residence, Marriage to William Hunt Scott, Viola’s birth, and Samuel’s birth.

Further Actions / Follow-up

  • More Location-Historical Research

————–  Disclaimer  ————–



Sources

  • “United States Census, 1850,” database
with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M85-FL4 : 12 April 2016), Sylvania Hendricks, Washington county, Washington, Illinois, United States; citing family 1241, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • 1860 Census (NARA), 1860 – William H Scott (Wm K Scott). Year: 1860; Census Place: Township 3 S Range 4 W, Washington, Illinois; Roll: M653_235; Page: 942; Family History Library Film: 803235. https://search.ancestry.com/collections/7667/records/37930464.
  • “United States Census, 1870,”
(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M6WN­2W2 : 17 October 2014), Sam Scott in household of Willin Scott, Illinois, United States; citing p. 18, family 122, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 545,778.
  • Chris H. Baily, The Jehu Scott Family (Eustis, FL, Chris H. Baily), Files (Personal), Person 10 – William Hunt Scott. Bailey, Chris, “The Jehu Scott Family” accessed 7/16/16.
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com –  accessed 04 May 2019), memorial page for Emily M. Hendricks Scott (22 Oct 1836–27 Oct 1878), Find A Grave Memorial no. 80527356, citing Hammond Cemetery, Sesser, Franklin County, Illinois, USA; Maintained by Gravedigger49 (contributor 47282320).
  • “Illinois, County Marriages, 1810-1940,” database, FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KFKW-85D : 3 March 2016), Samuel V. Scott and Amanda J. Haley, 24 May 1879; citing Franklin, Illinois, United States, county offices, Illinois; FHL microfilm 1,005,307.
  • “Illinois, County Marriages, 1810-1940,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KFKW-26N : 5 November 2017), Patience Marshall in an entry for Francis P. Scott and Florence E. Roberts, 24 Mar 1901; citing Franklin, Illinois, United States, county offices, Illinois; FHL microfilm 1,005,307.

Endnotes

[i] Internet: Wikipedia – St. Clair County, Illinois, Demographics – Historical Population Table. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Clair_County,_Illinois#Demographics

Emily Hendricks in the Censuses

Roberts/Scott/Hendricks
Census Sunday

For some time, I have known that my 3rd great-grandmother, Emily Hendricks’s parents were Vaden and Sylvania (Brown) Hendricks. During my research into Emily, I wanted to find her in all of the censuses during her lifetime. I believe I have found her in both the 1840 and 1850 Censuses.

1850 Census
Household of Sylvania Hendricks, Washington county, Illinois[i].

Household   Sex Age Birthplace
Sylvania Hendricks  F 42 Kentucky
William Hendricks  M 19 Kentucky
Emily Hendricks  F 15 Kentucky
Nancy E Hendricks  F 11 Kentucky
Mary J Hendricks  F 9 Illinois

This record suggests many things.

That Sylvania is the head of household suggests that her husband, Vaden, died before the 1850 Census and after Mary was conceived in 1840. Also, because Sylvania was only 33-years-old when Mary was born, her husband likely died before 1845[ii].

The family could have been in either Illinois or Kentucky in 1840 as they probably moved from Kentucky to Illinois sometime between 1839 and 1841.[iii]

Let’s see if we can find the family in the 1840 Census. In 1840, I would expect the following in a household:

  • Female:           Age 32
  • Male:               Age 9
  • Female:           Age 5
  • Female:           Age 1

If they had migrated to Illinois by 1 June 1840, I would expect them to be in Washington County.

During the 1840 Census, there were 87 Hendricks families in Illinois, but none were in Washington County. However, there was a Baden Hendrix in adjoining St. Clair County. Could this be the household of Emily’s father?

Baden Hendrix Household 1840 Census[iv]

<5 5-10 10-15 15-20 20-30 30-40 40 to >100
Males 1 1 1 All Blank
Females 2 1 All Blank

Yes, Sylvania fits the female between 30 and 40. The son, William, fits the 5-10 range. One daughter fits into the two daughters under 5. The other daughter was probably 5, but could have easily been 4.  The one son, between 10 and 15 would have been between 20 and 25 during the 1850 Census; he is likely to have been enumerated elsewhere.  As such, I’m confident that Emily is one of the two girls under five enumerated in the Baden Hendrix Household during the 1840 Census. With that finding, I have discovered Emily in all of the census records during her lifetime and have her Birth, Marriage, and Death information.



Endnotes:

[i] “United States Census, 1850,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M857-FL8 : 12 April 2016), Household of Sylvania Hendricks, Washington county, Illinois, United States; citing family 1241, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

[ii] Within 4 Year’s of Mary’s birth, I would have expected Sylvania to have had another child if her husband were still living.

[iii] Between the births of Nancy and Mary.

[iv] “United States Census, 1840,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHBJ-RD6 : 15 August 2017), Baden Hendrix, St Clair, Illinois, United States; citing p. 322, NARA microfilm publication M704, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 70; FHL microfilm 7,644.