Rose – Surname Saturday

By Don Taylor

Surname Origin

The surname Rose can be of English, Scottish, Irish, French, Danish, and German origin. It could relate to a physical place where wild roses grew, a hereditary sign, or even the nickname for a person with a Rosy complexion.

I am yet to determine an immigrant Rose ancestor, so it is unclear which of the many Rose origins relate to my wife’s Rose ancestors.

Geographical

The United States includes the most people with the Rose surname, with England and Germany distant second and third. In terms of frequency, Jamaica has the highest proportion of the Rose surname globally, with 1 in 338 having the surname.

In the United States, California has the greatest number of people, over 21,000, with the Rose surname. West Virginia has the greatest proportion, with one in 673 people having the Rose surname.

Direct Rose Ancestors

According to Ancestry, in 1840, the greatest number of Roses lived in New York. There were only 91 Rose heads of households in North Carolina in 1840. Elizabeth had married long before then, so she wouldn’t have been counted as a Rose then.

All of our known Rose ancestors were born in North Carolina. Elizabeth and William senior died in North Carolina. William Rose, Jr. appears to have died in Georgia.

Direct William Rose Descendants

William Rose was born in 1733. He married Mary (LNU) on 27 January 1758 in Halifax County, North Carolina. They had at least two children, including 4th great-grandfather William Rose. William died in 1785 in Halifax County, North Carolina.

Both William Rose, Sr., and his son, William Rose, Jr., were patriots during the Revolutionary War. DAR Ancestor Numbers A206187 and A206765.

I have 176 known descendants of William Rose in my Howell-Darling research.

Surnames include:

      • Boseman
      • Capel
      • Clement
      • Cuthrell
      • Fizur
      • Hallmark
      • Hockaday
      • Howell
      • Johnson
      • Powell
      • Rose
      • Vincent
      • Welch

I only have three photographs of William Rose’s descendants. All are from his Howell descendants.

Peter Fletcher Howell (1842-1924)
James Dallas Howell (1879-1964)
Photo of Clarence Fletcher Howell
Clarence Fletcher Howell (1918-1999)

Sources:

  • Ancestry Surname Page: Rose.
  • Forebears Surnames Page: Rose.
  • Genealogy Bank Page: Rose.
  • Ancestry – Don Taylor’s Howell-Darling-2020 tree on Ancestry, accessed 5 February 2021.
  • DAR Genealogical Research Databases – Descendants List, DAR, DAR – Nat’l #: 986074 – Ancestor #: A206765 – William Rose, Sr., William Rose, Jr.

  • DAR Genealogical Research Databases – Descendants List, DAR, DAR – Nat’l #: 874114 – Ancestor #: A206187 – William Rose, Jr.

Hiram Vincent in the News

In the News
Howell, Vincent (Vinson)
By Don Taylor

“In the News” is my reporting of newly discovered newspaper articles regarding the ancestors I am researching. The information found in newspapers often raises more questions and more research areas, but invariably suggests new avenues for research plus providing texture to the life of an ancestor.

Hiram Vincent Appointed Guardian

Hiram Vincent is my wife’s 3rd great-uncle. He is the son Berkett Vincent (c. 1776 – c. 1845) and the brother of  John Vincent (1817-bef. 1870), my wife’s 2nd great-grandfather. This set of four articles show Hiram being appointed and maintaining his guardianship for two of his sons.

Article

newspapers.comFrom the Bolivar Bulletin (Bolivar, TN) dated Friday, 6 March 1874.

“Synopsis County Court, March Term | 1874.”
Guardians Appointed.

Hiram Vinson Guardian of his children.

It seems strange to me that Hiram would be granted guardianship of HIS children. I wonder if it was a legal thing or if there is more to the story. Certainly, the County Court Records should talk about what may have occurred.


Two years later, the following ran in:

The Bolivar Bulletin (Bolivar, TN) dated Thursday, 13 April 1876.

Guardians Appointed.

Hiram Vinson for J H and T A Vinson.

“J H Vinson” and “T A Vinson” must be Hiram’s two sons, Joseph Hiram Vincent and Thomas Anthony Vincent. In 1876, Joseph, the older of the two, would have been 15 years old and Thomas, 13. Yes, they are minor children, but I would not expect that a formal guardianship by their father would be required. There must be something else causing this. Court records should tell the story.


Two years after that, the following ran in:

The Bolivar Bulletin (Bolivar, TN) dated Thursday, 11 April 1878.

County Court
Synopsis of Proceedings April Term 1878

Hiram Vinson renewed his bond as guardian of his children.


Finally, two years later the following ran:

The Bolivar Bulletin (Bolivar, TN) dated Thursday, 15 April 1880.

Venire July Circuit Court

Hiram Vincent renewed bond as guardian J H and T A Vincent.

Once again, the articles highlight that the surname Vinson and Vincent are used interchangeably. As a note, I use Vincent when speaking of the family line and use Vincent when talking about an individual. I use Vinson when a particular document uses the name. In 1880, the two boys would have been 19 and 17 respectively.

Follow-up:

Determine why Hiram needed to be granted guardianship of his children in 1874. (Get copies of the court documents.)


Endnotes

All “In the New” entries used in this posting came from Newspapers.Com, their Tennessee Newspapers collection.

William Hiram Vincent & the Early Censuses

Howell-Vincent Line
Census Sunday
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.My wife’s third great-grandfather, Burkett Vincent, may have had 12 children, or he may have had eight.  He apparently had two wives, Elizabeth Rose and an unknown first wife. To attempt to understand the Vincent family of Halifax, North Carolina, I thought I’d look closer at the children of Burkett (and Elizabeth).

Known Children of Burkett & Elizabeth Vincent

    • William Hiram Vincent
    • John Vincent
    • James Vincent
    • Elisha Vincent
    • Susan Vincent
    • Nancy Vincent
    • Burkett Vincent

There were also two boys and two girls who were born between 1810 and 1820.  It is unclear if these are William, John, Elisha, and a heretofore unknown girl.  There was also another girl born between 1804 and 1820 that is presumed to be Burkett’s oldest daughter.

I’ll take a look at each of the children, in turn, starting with:

William Hiram Vincent (1814-1893)

1890 Census (Not Available) 

Hardeman County Courthouse in Bolivar
Hardeman County Courthouse – Photo By RealElectrical, CC BY-SA 3.0

1880 Census[i] – Hiram Vinson was a farmer living with three of his children in District 9, Hardeman County, Tennessee. With him are his daughter, Francis, and two sons, Joe and Tom.

1870 Census[ii] – Hiram Vincent was a farmer living with seven implied children.  The oldest one and the youngest two were his children according to the 1880 Census, so I’m confident ascribing the other four children as his. This adds, James J., William, McAllister, and Martha to his list of children. It also provides a first name for his daughter Mary Frances, and middle initials for Joseph and Thomas. All the children were born in Tennessee, so I’d expect to find the family in Tennessee during the 1860 Census. 

1860 Census[iii] – Hiram Vintson [sic] and his wife Catherine are living in Hardeman, Tennessee, with their children, Mary, James, William, Elisha, and Martha. Elisha wasn’t enumerated in the 1870 Census, so he is assumed to have died between 1860 and 1870. Mary and James attended school. All were enumerated as having been born in North Carolina, although later censuses all suggest they were born in Tennessee. 

1850 Census[iv] – Hirum Vincin [sic] and his wife Catherine are living in Hardeman, Tennessee with their daughter, Mary. Hirum and Catherine had been married within the past year. Hirum is listed as “Overseer” for an occupation. Of Interest, Hirum is listed as 32 years old, suggesting birth between 1827 and 1828, where other census records suggest he was born between 1825 and 1826. 

1840 Census – In my initial review of Burkett Vinson, I ascribed the male, 20 to 29 years old, as presumed to be John Vinson. Upon further research, I have learned that John had two brothers also born between 1810 to 1820, Hiram and James. The male, 20 to 29 years old in the household of Burkett Vinson could easily have been any of the three. A look through the other Vinson’s in Halifax County yielded four results. Only Burkett and Robert had households that included a 20 to 29-year-old male. Further, Paul Vincent of Hardeman County, Tennessee was the only household with a 20 to 29-year-old. So, Hiram could have been the young man in the household. Alternately, Hiram could be elsewhere, or he could have been missed completely.

1830 Census – In my review of Burkett Vincent, it appeared that the teenager, age 15 to 20, in the household of Burkett Vincent is Hiram (William Hiram Vincent).

1820 Census – In my review of Burkett Vincent, it appeared that one of the children, a male under 10, in the household of Burkett Vincent is Hiram (William Hiram Vincent). 

Conclusion

William Hiram Vincent is in the FamilySearch tree as ID LHCZ-XB8. Census records before 1850 do not appear to clearly identify William Hiram Vincent as being enumerated. No new information regarding his parents was discovered.


Endnotes:

[i] 1880 Census, Family Search, 1880 Census – [William] Hiram Vinson – District 9, Hardeman, Tennessee. “United States Census, 1880,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MD7D-QFM : 15 July 2017), Tom Vinson in household of Hiram Vinson, District 9, Hardeman, Tennessee, United States; citing enumeration district ED 58, sheet 474A, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), FHL microfilm 1,255,260.

[ii] 1870 Census (FS), Family Search, 1870 Census – Hiram Vincent – Bolivar, Hardeman, Tennessee. “United States Census, 1870”,
 database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M VD7 : 14 June 2019), Hiram Vincent,
1870.  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MDD3-VD7?from=lynx1UIV8&treeref=LHCZ-XB8.

[iii] 1860 Census, Family Search, 1860 Census – [William] Hiram Vintson [Vincent] – 7th District, Hardeman, Tennessee. “United States Census, 1860”, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M8TD-4ZK : 18 March 2020), Martha A Vintson in an entry for Hiram Vintson, 1860.

[iv] 1850 Census (NARA), 1850 Census – Hirum Vincin – Hardeman, Tennessee. “United States Census, 1850,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCDF-P2G : 4 April 2020), Mary Vincin in household of Hirum Vincin, Hardeman county, Hardeman, Tennessee, United States; citing family 676, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

Ancestor Sketch – Elizabeth Rose (?)

Howell-Vincent/Vinson-Rose
By Don Taylor

I used to, mistakenly, say that there are no real “Brick Walls.” Typically, a “Brick wall” is just a difficult record to find or a record that isn’t worth paying someone else to find for you.  In the case of Elizabeth, who married Burkett Vincent and had several children with him, including my wife’s 2nd great grandfather, John Vincent, there just might be a true brick wall. I have a couple more really involved actions to try but I’m not holding my breath thinking it will solve my dilemma.

Howell/Darling – Ancestor #37

List of Grandparents

  • Grandfather: 4.  James Dallas Howell (1879-1964)
  • 1st Great-grandmother: 9.   Susan R. Vinson Howell (1848-1910)
  • 2nd Great-grandfather: 18.  John Vincent (1817-bef. 1870)
  • 3rd Great-grandmother: 37.  Elizabeth Rose ? (1785 – 186?)

Elizabeth Rose (1785-186?)

Birth

I am yet to find a source for Elizabeth’s parents.  I took a look at Ancestry Trees and found the following parents indicated:

  • Forty-seven (47) trees suggest William Rose (1759-1801) and Sarah Crawley (1775-1863).
  • Fourteen (14) trees propose Elisha Rose Sr. (1753-1795) and Hannah Sellers (1758-1812).
  • Two trees indicate Elisha Rose and Pheroby Powell (died 1794).

I have not found any sources proving her parents identities. All suggest other people’s trees as their source.

It appears that Elizabeth’s husband, Burkett Vincent. Died before the 1850 Census as Elizabeth is enumerated as the head of a household consisting of her and one daughter, Nancy. Also, during the 1850 Census her son John is living next door.

Looking at censuses before 1850, Elizabeth would have been a female in the household of her husband, Burkett.

The Burket Vinson household of the 1840 Census included a female age 50 to 59 which is presumed to be Elizabeth. Additionally, there are males and females enumerated that align with Burkett (Jr.), John, and Nancy in the household.

The 1830 Census throws the monkey wrench into the works.  None of the children of Burkett and Elizabeth are enumerated. Rather four different boys and three different girls are enumerated. All older. I suppose it is possible they were entered on the wrong columns, but I don’t know. My suspicion is that Burkett had a first wife and children with her. The children were still with him, and another female, possibly a sister of Burkett, was in the household.

This idea carries on even stronger into the 1820 census. There, living in Burkett’s household is a female over 45. Elizabeth would have been 35 in 1820. So, I don’t believe it is Elizabeth with Burkett in either the 1820 or 1830 censuses. A scenario wherein Burkett was married, his wife died, he remarried Elizabeth. Elizabeth appears to have had children from a previous marriage, who then took on the Vincent surname.

Of course, this is all speculation, but it does provide a plausible explanation for the conflicting Census Records.

What I think I know

  • 1785 – Elizabeth was born – Parents unclear.
  • 1835 – Elizabeth Rose possibly married Burkett Vincent sometime between 1830 and 1840.
  • 1840 – Elizabeth is probably the female 50-59 in the household of Burkett Vincent
  • 1850 – Elizabeth is the 64-year-old head of a household consisting of her and her 25-year-old daughter, Nancy.
  • 1860 – Elizabeth is the 75-year-old woman in the household of her son, John, his wife Ellenor, and their six children.
  • I believe that Elizabeth died sometime before 1870.

Further Actions / Follow-up

  • Query private tree owners for birth source information.
  • Detail the lives of each of the children of Burkett Vincent and Elizabeth Rose.
  • Detail the lives of the probable siblings of Elizabeth Rose.

————–  Disclaimer  ————–

Continue reading “Ancestor Sketch – Elizabeth Rose (?)”

Vincent-Vinson – Surname Saturday

By Don Taylor

Name Origin Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.

It seems that the surname “Vinson” has two separate origins. First is that it comes from the “son of Vin or Vincent.” The second is that it is a corruption or variant of “Vincent.” It does not appear that my wife’s ancestors were from a patronymic society, so Vinson is more likely  a corruption of “Vincent.”

When in doubt, I’ll now use Vincent as the preferred surname, unless there is some uncontroversial reason for using Vinson. That plan suggests I need to relook carefully at my wife’s great-grandmother, Susan R Vinson, whose parents were John and Lenora Vincent.

Geographical

Worldwide there are approximately 283,936 people who bear the Vincent surname.

It is most prevalent in France, with the United States having the second-highest incidence, with over 67,000 Vincent’s in the US.

My Wife’s Earliest Vincent Ancestors

All of my wife’s Vincent ancestors lived in North Carolina. Her earliest known Vincent ancestor was Philip Vincent. It is not clear where he was born, but during the 1800 Census, he was over 45, suggesting he was born before 1755. He lived in Edgecombe County, North Carolina, in 1790. In 1840, Philip’s son, Burkett Vincent, was living in Halifax County with a household consisting of 5 people. His was one of only 22 Vincent families living in North Carolina during 1840. Burkett’s son, John Vincent was born about 1816 in Halifax County and died sometime before 1870. His daughter, Susan R. Vincent (aka Susan Vinson) was born on 22 August 1848. She married Peter Fletcher Howell shortly after the Civil War, on 10 December 1866.

Direct Vincent (Vinson) Ancestors

      1. Great-grandmother: Susan R Vinson (aka Vincent) (1848-1910) Family Search
      2. 2nd Great-grandfather: John Vincent (1816-1870) Family Search
      3. 3nd Great-grandfather: Burkett Vincent (1779-1850) Family Search
      4. 4rd Great-grandfather: Philip Vincent (bef. 1755-c.1807) Family Search

Known relatives.

My records have 155 direct-line descendants of Philip Vincent identified, which is almost 5% of my Howell-Darling Research.

Sources: