Bertha Barbara Trümpi Huber


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52 Ancestors #18 – Bertha Barbara Trümpi Huber (1884-1968)

Bio – Bertha Barbara Trümpi Huber

The umlaut helps to confuse Bertha’s records in America. Usually the umlaut is dropped and Trumpi is used, it is also Trumpe and sometimes Trumpy, misspellings include Trunpe. Bertha was born the oldest child of Bernhead Trumpe and Bertha Koch on 9 May 1894, in Ennenda, Glarus, Switzerland. We know nothing about her childhood, although we do know she “came from a big family and had a stepmother as her father married twice.
She is our most recent immigrant coming to America in 1903, when she was only 18 years old. She came in the care of an aunt and uncle who traveled from America to get her in Switzerland and bring her back. She then settled in Wisconsin where she met Johann (John) Huber. She married Johann on 2 March 1905 in New Glarius, Wisconsin,[1] most likely at the Swiss Church in New Glarus in an ecclesiastical ceremony by Rev. A. Roth. Anna Altman and Gebert Huber were the witnesses.
The young couple settled in Primrose, Dane county, Wisconsin. [2]
In April of 1908, she had her first child, a daughter, Florence Wilma Huber.
1909 ad for Baldwin County Colonization Co.
From Morning Star (Rockford, IL)   Page- 13 
Three Chicago businessmen formed the Baldwin County Colonization Company in 1903: Alexander Klappenback, F. W. Herdick, and Henry Bartling. They hoped to establish a German colony near Perdido Bay. In 1904, settlers were offered 20 and 40-acre portions of land.[3] They offered free trips to southern Alabama in February to people who bought land in the Colony.
The excitement of land of their own in the warmth of Alabama enticed the young family to move south in 1907 or 1908. Shortly after she and John located to Elberta, Baldwin County, Alabama, in 1908 she gave birth to her second child.[4]
Sometime between 1916 and 1920, the young family decided to return to the north and purchased a farm in James Township, Saginaw County, Michigan. After daughter died in 1934, their granddaughter came to live with them (Bertha, her husband, and her son Clarence). Bertha spoke Romansh, High German, and English. Her husband died in 1948. She continued to live at the James Township farm until she died from a coronary occlusion on 21 March 1964.
Bertha was buried in an unmarked grave at Oakwood Cemetery, Saginaw, Michigan. Section 116, Plot S692 on March 25th.
List of Great Ancestors
1.    Bertha Barbara Trümpi  
2.     Bernhead Trümpe

Sources:

[1] Wisconsin Marriage Records, Johana Huber and Bertha Trunpe, 02 Mar 1905.   .
[2] Wisconsin State Censuses, 1895 and 1905, Ancestry.Com
[3] Baldwin County, AL Genealogy Trails. See: http://genealogytrails.com/ala/baldwin/cities/elberta.html
[4] 1910 Census, Ancestry.com, http://www.Ancestry.com, Elberta and Josephine, Baldwin, Alabama; Roll: T624_1; Page: 5A; Enumeration District: 0013; FHL microfilm: 1374014.

Henry Brown (c. 1843- c. 1888)

52 Ancestors # 13 – William Henry Brown (1842-c. 1888)

Henry Brown is one of the most challenging of my ancestors to follow and figure out. Through the years I have confused him with others on several cases, establishing lines that weren’t correct. There are many researchers that have linked him as the son of Benjamin Brown and Eliza Fowler.  I agreed with that assessment for a long time, however, recently I’ve begun to think he was the son of Barney and Mary Brown. I am hoping that by writing this biography I will be able to solidify in my mind key relationships and provide the mechanism to provide proof for some of my assumptions.  

Biography – William Henry Brown (c. 1843- c. 1888)

With a name as common as Henry Brown, finding the right Henry Brown has always been a challenge.  
W. H. Brown (Henry) and his wife Marion are in the 1885 Census in Jamestown, Stutsman county, Dakota Territories. Their youngest son, Edward, was born in Dakota Territory about 1884  and their youngest daughter, Ada, was born in Michigan about 1882, so it appears they located to Dakota Territory about 1883.  I have been unsuccessful finding anything about Henry or Marion after 1885.  By 1900 their children appear to be scattered throughout the upper midwest with Arthur in Crow Wing county Minnesota, Charles in Montana, Clifford in Wisconsin, Clyde in Wells, ND, and Edward in Kidder county, ND. Tracking their other children may yield further results.  Henry & Marion don’t seem to appear in Find-a-Grave or any of the ND newspapers I’ve been able to search.  They just sort of vanish.
Property that Henry Brown probably rented.
Map courtesy of University of Michigan,
Digital Library Production Services 
The 1880 census shows Henry in Saline, Washtenaw county, Michigan. He was a 37 year-old farmer. With him is Marian and eight of his children, Arthur, Charles, Mary, Ahmond, Clifford, William, Clyde, & Addison. Of interest, his oldest, Nettie, does not appear with them in the 1880 Census, however, she does in the 1885 Dakota Census.  Frederick who shows in the 1885 census shows in the 1880 census as Addison. The 1880 census also indicates that his parents were both from New York.  Also, based upon the 1880 census and the neighbors and the 1870 census and his neighbors then, it appears that he was farming land owned by either Ezra Sanford (uncle of Marion) or possibly property of J. Perry (unknown relationship) as shown in an 1874 map of the Saline Village and area. You can also see that Chester Parson, Marian’s grandfather, owns a lot of the land in the area.
The 1870 census shows Henry in Saline with wife Marian and children Nettie and Arthur, as we would expect. Henry is 25 years old and his wife is 23.  Son Arthur is 7 months old, which confirms the December 1869 birth (Census was taken 2 Aug 1870). Neighbors included William Sanford (Marian’s father) and Peter Trim (P.E. Trim’s Est on the map). 
The 1860 census has long been problematic for me. For a long time I had believed that Henry was with his father Benjamin and mother Eliza (Fowler) in Vernon, Shiawassee county about 60 miles away from Saline.  I often wondered how Henry and Marian could have met — 60 miles is a long ways – but not impossible.  
After more research, I found another candidate for Henry in the 1860 Census in Saline.  17 year-old Henry W Brown shows up in the 1860 census living with Daney  and Mary E Brown. The age and place are right but the parents were born in the wrong states. As I mentioned  before the 1880 census indicates his parents were born in New York.  This 1860 census indicates his father born in New Hampshire and mother in New Jersey. Hummm — Not good. I had initially dismissed this family unit out of hand.  The conflict is mitigated in the 1850 census and find “Daney” as “Barney” and mother Mary born in New York instead of New Jersey. Also, the name of the child Henry W. changes to William H., which puts Henry’s name into the proper order and the W. H. Brown of the 1885 census makes sense. The 1870 Census doen’t show Barney/Daney, however, there is a Mary Brown (born in New York) of the right age living alone. So I think Barney/Daney passed between 1860 and 1970. 
If Henry was the child of Barney/Daney and Marion he would have several siblings, apparently a brother Myron O, sister Alice C, and brother David V.  His paternal grandmother would have been Jane.   
If Henry’s parentage was Barney/Daney and Mary instead of Benjamin and Eliza, he would have been born between July 5th and September 6th, 1842 (He was 8 on 6 Sep 1850 and 17 on 5 Jul 1960.) In 1870 he was 25 and in 1880 census he was 37 in 1885 and those dates I’m sure of.
Returning to the previously assumed Benjamin & Eliza parentage, we would find Henry as 7 years old in 1850 and 16 years old in 1860.  Again this doesn’t reconcile itself with his being 25 and 35 in 1870 and 1880. If correct that would put his birthdate between 15 June and 8 August 1843. 
Now the 1870 enumeration date was 2 August says Henry was 25 and the 1880 enumeration was 9 June and finds Henry as 37. 
So, If I consider the 1870 census incorrect, then the Henry whose childhood was in Saline fits and is the most likely.  
I’d love to hear from anyone who has more information or can otherwise can help me untangle these conflicts. Please feel free to comment below.

Short Bio – William Henry Brown (1842- c 1888)

William Henry Brown (Henry) was born between July 5th and September 6th, 1842 of Barney/Daney and Mary Brown in Saline, Washtenaw county, Michigan; He was the oldest of at least four children. 
By First Presbyterian Church (Saline, Mich.),
Nehemiah P. Stanton [Public domain],
via Wikimedia Commons
He married Marian Sanford about 1866.  They lived in Saline, having at least 10 children there. 
About 1883 they moved to North Dakota and had one more child there. Both he and his wife probably died before 1900. It is unknown where they are buried.

Future Research

Switch William Henry Brown to indicate different/parents in all my records. 
Flesh out the Barney/Daney Brown family unit.
Do a “deep dive” into William Henry Brown.
Sources: 
1850 Census – Barney Brown.
1850 Census – Benjamin Brown.
1860 Census – Daney Brown.
1860 Census – Benjamin Brown.
1870 Census – Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan – Henry Brown.
1880 Census – Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan – Henry Brown.
1885 Census – Dakota Territory, NDSU Archives, Page 44-018. Brown, W. H., et al.
Minnesota, Death Certificate #2215, Arthur D Brown.
University of Michigan’s Digital Library Production Services. – Pictorial History of Ann Arbor – Map of Saline Township. T.P. No. 4 S. Range No. 5 E [plat]; 1874

Bio – Ida Mae Barber (1874-1953)

52 Ancestors #11 – Ida Mae Barber (Montran) (Fisher)
(Holdsworth) (Knight) (1874-1953)

When I decided to look at Ida Mae’s life I realized that my
source work regarding Ida Mae was woefully inadequate.  Most of the work I did regarding Ida Mae was was done several years ago and I wasn’t as good about creating source
records that were complete and stood on their own. Some of the source citations were entirely in
my Family Tree Maker for Mac and were corrupted during various upgrades (FTM 4
Mac 2 to FTM 4 Mac 3 was particularly painful).
I decided to redo everything regarding Ida, that is to say,
pull together my physical copies/printouts, look through my computer for
relevant files, confirm sources in FTM & Ancestry, and build new source citations
and documents.
One thing I did realize in this process is that when you
attach media to a source, FTM allows you to link to existing media or to copy
the media into FTM.  I was inconsistent
in my approach.  I did both.  I found that over the years where I linked to
existing files the linkage was often broken. 
I know that copying it into FTM duplicates the file and my “duplicate
file finder” will spit out long lists of duplicates, but, it will be worth
doing so in the future.
After I cleaned up my sources for Ida, I did some new
research and found several items regarding Ida’s early marriages. 
– – – – – – – – – – – – – 

Bio – Ida Mae Barber (1874-1953)

Ida Mae Barber was born on March 24, 1874, in Michigan, the
first of two daughters of Franklin (Frank) and Sarah Blackhurst Barber.

Albion College, founded in 1835, 
would have been a influence on
 young Ida’s upbringing.
Woodcut in the Public Domain (via Wikimedia)
She grew up in Albion, Calhoun County, Michigan, which is a
small town about 100 miles west of Detroit which is the home to Albion College. In the 1880 Census she is six years
old living with her parents and her younger sister Eva.
I believe that sometime in 1892 Ida married John
Montran.  John is identified by name
several times and when Ida marries this second time she indicates that she had
been married before and that her name was Ida Barber Montrani.  The “Montrani” name is new in my research (I
had always looked for Montran and Montram previously) so, it gives me a new area
of research.) I had long believed that Ida had Madonna out of wedlock, but now
I suspect that she actually did marry John.
Ida’s daughter, Madonna, 
was born 20 Feb 1893.
Ida married her second husband, Max E. Fisher on 21 May 1897
in Detroit Michigan. The wedding was performed by Fred E. DeGaw, J. P.  and the witnesses were Frederick Mullau and
Herman Schcontt, both of Detroit. 
According to the marriage records, Ida was from Albion and Max was from
Detroit so their being married in Detroit makes sense.
Oddly enough, the 1900 Census shows Max, Ida, and Madonna
Fisher living at 374 Third Street. Manistee, Michigan.  I say oddly because Manistee is on the
opposite side of the state from Detroit; it’s on the coast of Lake Michigan. Google Maps does not
have street views of Manistee so I can’t tell if where they lived is still
there.  Also, Google Maps doesn’t
indicate the address in Manistee but rather that 374 Third Street is across
Manistee Lake in East Lake. 
The former Essex County Courthouse, built in 1855
it is where Ida & Joseph would have been married.
Photo by C Hanchey via Flickr – Some rights reserved.

Her husband, Max, apparently died because Ida married Jos
(Joseph) A Holdsworth in Essex, Ontario, Canada on 16 Aug 1904.  Essex is a small town about 20 miles across
the river from Detroit. The marriage information indicates that Holdsworth was
from Minneapolis.  The record shows Ida
as a “ditto” for where she lived, so it may be that she spent some time in
Minneapolis before they were married.  
The record also indicates that she was a widow.  (I’d like to find a death record for Max to
confirm that.)

Ida divorced Holdsworth before the 1910 census was taken in
April.  In the 1910 census, Ida was the
head of the household with 17 year-old daughter Madonna and her 62 year-old
mother Sarah Barber living with her.  It
appears that she wasn’t working but Madonna was a saleswoman at a dry goods
store.  Living with them was a “boarder,”
Harvey Knight. They lived at 418 Clay Ave, near Russell Street.  Detroit renumber many of its streets a few
years later so it is difficult to determine if the building they lived in is
still there.  Most likely not, The
intersection of where Clay and Russell would meet is now taken by the Chrysler
Freeway (I75).
Ida and Harvey Watson Knight were married on 27 Aug 1910 in Detroit.  It is interesting to note that the marriage
performed by Justice Fred E DeGaw, the same person who performed her
marriage  to Max Fisher. Frank G Schilling
and Winnifred Andrews both of Detroit as witnesses.
Ida & Harvey moved to new home at 628 Lawndale in
1914.  It is assumed that they built the
home and/or were the first owners.   
Harvey Milton Knight
died at 10 months from
mercury dichloride. 
Ida and Harvey’s only child together, Harvey Milton Knight,
was born on 20 November 1915.  Sadly,
Harvey Milton died at 10 months of age from accidental poisoning of mercury
dichloride. Oral history indicated that Milton died from getting a poison from
under the sink and ingesting it. His story is a reminder that children need to
be protected from access to dangerous chemicals.
In 1917, Ida’s only sibling, sister Eva, died from
tuburculous.  Now, Eva was married to Adelbert
Goff and lived in Farmington, MI.  Ida’s
grandchildren recall visiting an “Uncle Del” when they went to Walled Lake in
the 1930s and 1940s.  Farmington would
have been about a half-mile off the highway to Walled Lake.  Both of Ida’s grandchildren assumed that
“Uncle Del” was just a friend that was called “Uncle.”  I believe A-DEL-bert was “Uncle Del” as location,
names, and oral history all fit.
In 1918, Harvey registered for the draft.  That document shows still living at 628
Lawndale.
The 1920 census finds Ida and Harvey living along at the
Lawndale house.  Daughter Madonna is on
the road in the vaudeville comedy show “Chin Chin.” However, Madonna is listed
in the Census living in an apartment in New York with her widowed grandmother,
Sarah.
1456 Lawndale Today
Screenshot courtesy Google Maps
In February of 1923, Madonna, now “Donna” registers a song
with Variety.  In that registration she
indicates her address as 1456 Lawndale. 
I was at first confused by that as it is unusual for people to move  eight blocks up the street, particularly from
a new (only 9 years old at that time) home. 
A comparison of neighbors showed that the Knights had the same neighbors
in the 1920 and the 1930 censuses. Without a doubt, they didn’t move rather the
street was renumbered to fit a larger system sometime between 1920 and 1923. 
In 1930, the 47 year-old Ida was still living at 1456
Lawndale with her husband, Harvey. Ida and Harvey remained in that house until
Harvey’s death in May of 1942.  The 68
year-old Ida would have been left alone, except that her 14 year-old grandson
came to live with her and help out.
Marker for Knight Family
Harvey & Ida (Milton is on right side)
Photo by Don Taylor via Find a Grave
Ida died of an acute
coronary thrombosis at her home of nearly 40 years on 13 Oct 1953.  She was buried with her husband Harvey Watson
Knight and her son Harvey Milton in Plot 154, Oak Ridge Section, Woodmere Cemetery
in Detroit
Because this is my mother’s mother’s mother I carry Ida’s as well as her mother, Sarah Blackhurst, and her mother, Fanny Taylor’s Mitochondrial
DNA.  My sister’s daughter is the only
person who will carry their mtDNA (Haplogroup T2b) on to future generations.

Discover yourself at 23andMe
       [Disclaimer]

Areas for New Research

Search for Montrani instead of Montran in the usual places.
Search harder for Montran – Barber marriage records.
Research what may have been at 374 Third Street, Manistee.
Research actual date for street renumbering in Detroit.

Sources:

Ancestry.Com – Census Records 1880, 1900, 1910, 1920, 1930,
& 1940.
Ancestry.Com – World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918,
Ancestry.Com – Ontario, Canada Marriages, 1801-1928 – Jos
A Holdsworth – Ida Fisher.
Ancestry.Com – Ontario, Canada Marriages, 1801-1928
Family Search – Michigan, Marriages, 1868-1925 – Harvey Knight
Family Search – Michigan, Marriages, 1868-1925 – Max E Fisher
Michigan, Department Of Heath , Certificate of Death, Ida Mae
Knight. Wayne county, Michigan, Detroit. (Personal copy in my possession)
Michigan, Department Of Heath , Certificate of Death (In my
possession).

Social Security Application – Donna Montran Kees, Form SS-5  (Personal copy of document)

Bio – Harvey Watson Knight

Biography – Harvey Watson Knight
Harvey Watson Knight was the fourth husband of my great-grandmother, Ida Barber.
He was born on 4 March 1873 in Canada as the third child of Harvey Milton and Mary F. Harsen Knight.
He immigrated to the United States in 1884 and was naturalized in 1894.
Harvey married Ida Barber (Fisher) (Holdsworth) (Montran?) on 27 August 1910 in Detroit.
In 1910, Harvey was a “boarder” with Ida Barber Holdsworth her daughter Madona Holdsworth. And her mother Sarah Barber. Harvey and Ida Barber (Fisher) (Holdsworth) (Montran?) were married on 27 August 1910.
On 20 Nov 1915, Harvey and Ida celebrated the birth of a son, Harvey Milton Knight.  He was clearly named after Harvey’s father. Sadly on 25 September 1916, Harvey Milton died of accidental poisoning of Mercury dichloride.
Family tragedy struck again the following year when on 8 Nov 1917, Ida’s younger sister Eva died of TB.

In September 1918, Harvey registered for the WW1 draft; he lived at 628 Lawndale Ave., Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan. He worked as an engineer for Ireland Matthews at Beard & Chatfield Aves, Detroit, Michigan. He is described as Medium height, grey eyes, and black hair.

In 1920, he still lived at 628 Lawndale, Detroit, Wayne, Michigan, USA (Ward 20). He was working as an engineer at an auto shop.

In 1930, his address is 1456 Lawndale, Detroit, Wayne, Michigan, USA. It does not appear that he moved though. Most of his neighbors are the same as in the 1920 census, so it appears that the street addresses were changed. He still worked as an Engineer at an Auto Factory.

He remained in the same house in 1935 and 1940 where he worked as a Stationary Engineer at an auto body plant.

His mother, passed in 1941. It is unknown when his father passed.

He died at the Ypsilanti State Hospital, Washtenaw, Michigan, USA on 19 May 1942.

He is buried with his wife Ida Mae and his son, Milton in Plot 154, Oak Ridge Section, Woodmere Cemetery, Detroit, Wayne, Michigan.

Mom’s Memories 2

I was recently reading one of my favorite blogs, Marian’s Roots and Rambles. Her article was about “Any Sailors in the Family.”  I was a sailor, did 10 years active duty in the US Navy, but more interesting, I learned recently that my mother was a sailor as well.  She mentioned that somewhere or another she had gotten “seaman’s papers.” (I’ll have to look and see if I can figure out how to get a copy of them.)  She worked on a ferry boat on the Great Lakes.  In the early 1950’s she cooked aboard the SS Milwaukee Clipper. The ‘Clipper was an auto/train car (and passenger) ferry that ran between Muskegon, Michigan and Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She cooked and baked in the breads department and lived shipboard a season.  Of course, I was astonished and amazed.  It provided her with a place to stay (albeit cramped), meals, and money to send back to her mother to support me.  I had no idea.

By Boston Public Library [Public domain],
via Wikimedia Commons

I went on to find out that the S. S. Milwaukee Clipper is still in existence. The ‘Clipper is a National Historic Landmark and dockside in Muskegon, Michigan. Their website explains a lot about the ship and its history. Built in 1904 as the Junita she was sold and completely overhauled in 1940, where a new steel superstructure was installed, she was fireproofed, had AC installed to the staterooms, and other comforts were added. I am sure that the crew quarters were tight.

Anyway, it was a fascinating side trip into a bit of my mother’s history that I had no idea about.