Back to John Montran

Last month (July 2015), I wrote about finding John F. Montran in an index entry for my grandmother’s birth record and that I was ordering the microfilm from the Family History Library (FHL) for my use at my local Family History Center (FHC). I mentioned before I’d report my results from the film.

The FHL let me know when the film was shipped and let me know when it arrived at my local FHC.  Amazingly, it arrived the day before I was giving a presentation to the GPC-MGS on social networking so I would be there the very next day. Might the film include an actual birth certificate?  Might it include some other really important information?

After my presentation, I went into the FHC, had the librarian volunteer find the film for me, loaded the film into the reader, and began searching.  Brutal.  Yes, it came with an index but it was extremely hard to read.  I tried and tried and finally gave up using the index. I began browsing the records, beginning to end. Nothing.  Didn’t see my desired record after I viewed all the records on the microfilm.   “Come on already, it wouldn’t be in the index if there wasn’t something there,” I said to myself.  I thought about giving up on the search. This film appeared to be contain the same data as I had viewed before in another connection. I decided to continue viewing, this time from back to front.  Having gone through the film completely one way I had gained a fairly good understanding of how the film was organized and could focus on pages that were likely to contain the record I was looking for.  I found it! My grandmother’s birth registration entry.

Family History Library Film 1008278 – Page 290, Entry 435.

It was clearly a typed version of a record I had seen before, in handwritten form. The typist mistyped the surname as “Montrau” – Not surprising, having seen the original handwritten document.  It did mention that Madonna was “Legit”, something that I hadn’t seen in the handwritten version. Then I noticed at the bottom, “Original Records are missing for the following records 427 to 450.” So, Madonna’s record (#435) was known to be missing when this was typed. That explains why the Calhoun County Clerks people couldn’t find it. Now, I have evidence that an original record probably doesn’t and can put aside trying to find it.

This experience reminded me to not give up because you can’t find a record on the first pass of viewing a microfilm. Also, it also reminded me that just because I don’t think a record will yield any new information, I might be surprised by what is in the margins.

100 Years ago – Florence Wilma Huber – (1908-1934)

Research Darling/Huber

by Don Taylor

One hundred years ago, June 1915, Florence Wilma Huber was a six-year-old living on a farm in the Swiss Colony of Elberta and Josephine, Baldwin County, Alabama. Her father, John, and her mother Bertha (Trumpi) moved the family to Alabama from Wisconsin when Florence was a baby. Her five-year-old brother, Clarence, had been born in Alabama.

John was a farmer, but I suspect that farming was difficult for the young man from Switzerland. The land was much different from his native land and different from Wisconsin where he farmed for seven years.
Children_and_adults_in_front_of_a_school_building_in_rural_Baldwin_County_Alabama.jpg From Alabama Superintendent of Education photograph album, LPP16, Alabama Dept. of Archives and History. via ADAH http://digital.archives.alabama.gov/cdm/singleitem/collection/photo/id/18058/rec/1
Baldwin County School Building, c. 1913
Courtesy: Alabama Dept. of Archives and History
Both of Florence’s parents could read and write, so I suspect that Florence probably began school about that time. Certainly, she could read and write by the time they moved to Michigan and were enumerated in the 1920 census.
Family history says, “Bertha didn’t care much for Alabama, too hot and lots of bugs.” Also, we don’t know exactly when, possibly in 1915 or 1916, but according to family legend, John became a hobo, “riding the rails” for some time. After a bit, he came back to Bertha and said Michigan was the place they would move sometime between 1916 and 1919.
Nationally, June 1915 was an exciting time. Certainly, the war in Europe was taking central stage in the news. There was a major German offensive in Argonnes[1]. Nationally, The League to Enforce Peace was organized in Philadelphia, with former United States President, William Howard Taft, as the League’s president.[2] Meanwhile, President Wilson was demanding reparations for the German sinking of the Lusitania.
Locally, the sale and regulation of alcohol was a bitter issue in Alabama politics. In 1915, Gov. Henderson vetoed a ban on the sale of alcohol; however, the legislature overrode his veto. Despite prohibition, 386 illegal stills were seized in Alabama in 1915[3].

 

[2] Ibid.
[3] Alabama Department of Archives and History –http://archives.state.al.us/historythisweek/week27.html
————-  DISCLAIMER  ————-

Rufus Holton Darling (1816-1857)

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 42 – Rufus Holton Darling (1816-1857)

No Story Too Small

It is always a problem when you can’t find a person in a US Census while they were alive. It is particularly frustrating when you think you have the information that should find the individual in the various censuses. That is the case of Rufus Holton Darling. He died in 1857 and shows in the 1850 Census as you would expect. He is said to have come from Rome, Oneida County, New York and that his father’s name was Abner. That ought to be enough to find him, but alas, no such luck. I browsed the 1840 Census for Rome and only saw one Darling, Israel Darling, who had no males living with him aged 24 or so. Searches in the 1840, 1830, and 1820 censuses likewise did not result in any likely candidates. There are several other Darlings in the county during that time; so, I know I need to do a lot more research. I need to try to find each of these Darlings in Oneida County and trace them on to the 1850 Census, where all the members of the household are name. I hope that that will provide some insight.

Rufus Holton Darling (1816-1857)

Rufus Holton Darling was born in New York State about 1816.[1] This was the year that the U.S. Supreme Court affirms its right to review state court decisions, James Monroe was elected 5th president defeating Federalist Rufus King, and Indiana became the 19th state. Michigan wouldn’t become a state for another 21 years. Rufus is not a British name and it would be easy to speculate that Rufus was named after the presidential candidate, but we don’t really know where the name “Rufus” came from.

Nothing is known of Rufus’ youth, but in 1840, he left Rome, Oneida County, New York for the wilds of the new state of Michigan and settled in Kalamazoo[2]. 1840 was the year Army troops “transported” the local Indians to reservations west of the Mississippi. Kalamazoo was a fledgling village; the first permanent cabin was built there in 1829 and by 1840 the population had grown to over 1200 individuals in the village. Sometime in the 1840s, Rufus went into partnership with Milo J. Goss and established the Goss & Darling General Store.[3] In 1844, Rufus’ first son, Abner, was born. We know nothing about his first wife, her name, if they were married, or when she died, but in 1846 Rufus married Elizabeth Jane Swayze Wiseman[4], a widow, also with one child, a daughter. Also in 1846, the Michigan Central Railroad connected Kalamazoo to Detroit.

Marriage Notice August 1846
Kalamazoo Gazette (Kalamazoo, MI, ), 
Thanks to Genealogy Bank,

In 1848, Rufus and Elizabeth were living at the northwest corner of Cedar and Rose. They had the first, who they named Elizabeth, of their four children. In the fall of 1849, Rufus dissolved his partnership with Milo Goss and sold the Goss & Darling General Store[5]. In addition, in 1849, the railroad was expanding service to Chicago. Interesting enough, in the spring of 1850, Milo Goss went to California to make his fortune selling supplies to the gold miners. From 1849 to 1850, nearly 10% of Kalamazoo’s able-bodied men went to gold fields of California.

In 1852, Rufus ran for City Supervisor as a Whig[6]. He lost, however, it is clear that he was a leader in the city. Rufus and Elizabeth had twins, Eva and Emily; Eva died in 1853[7]. Emily was disabled; she never married and lived to be 65.

In 1854, Rufus was a Trustee for the city of Kalamazoo[8].

Marker: Father – Rufus Holton Darling 1816–1857
Courtesy: Find a Grave Memorial #30754149

In 1856, the neighbor across Cedar and Rose, whose name was H.G. Wells (not the author) invited a little-known Illinois lawyer named Abraham Lincoln to speak at a Republican rally at Bronson Park. We don’t know if he was able to attend his neighbor’s rally because Rufus was quite sick, an invalid, at that time. I’d like to think he was able to go up to the park and see Mr. Lincoln.

In June of 1857, Rufus and Elizabeth had a son they named Rufus Harry Darling[9]. The following month Rufus Holton Darling died of consumption (probably tuberculosis – although “consumption” was used to describe any degenerative lung disease). He was buried with Masonic honors at Mountain Home Cemetery, in Kalamazoo[10].

List of Greats

Rufus Harry Darling (1857-1907)
Rufus Holton Darling (1816-1857)
Abner Darling ( ? – ? )

[1] Mountain Home Plot
File (Kalamazoo County, ), Kalamazoogenealogy.org, Mountain Home
Burials by Lot Numbers, Block: 6. http://kalamazoogenealogy.org/Cemeteries/Mountain%20Home%20Plots/6.htm#16.
[2] Kalamazoo
Gazette  (Kalamazoo, MI, ), GenealogyBank, 1857-08-07 Pg- 2 – Died.
[3] Kalamazoo
Gazette  (Kalamazoo, MI, ), GenealogyBank, 1849-03-07 – Dissolution
[4] Kalamazoo
Gazette  (Kalamazoo, MI, ), GenealogyBank, 1846-08-XX, Pg X – Married, [Rufus Darling – Elizabeth Wiseman].
[5] Kalamazoo
Gazette  (Kalamazoo, MI, ), GenealogyBank, 1849-03-07 – Dissolution.
[6] Kalamazoo
Gazette  (Kalamazoo, MI, ), GenealogyBank, 1852-04-09, Pg 2 – THE ELECTION.
[7] Mountain Home Plot
File (Kalamazoo County, ), Kalamazoogenealogy.org, Mountain Home
Burials by Lot Numbers, Block: 6. http://kalamazoogenealogy.org/Cemeteries/Mountain%20Home%20Plots/6.htm#16.
[8] History of
Kalamazoo Michigan (Phildelphia, Everts & Abbott, 1880), Google Books, Page
226. http://books.google.com/books?id=qMXoj2IUNUUC.
[9] Michigan, Dept of
Public Health, Death Certificate, Seeking Michigan, Rufus H. Darling – Death 5
Jan 1917. Credit: Library of Michigan. http://seekingmichigan.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/p129401coll7/id/123256.
[10] Mountain Home Plot
File (Kalamazoo County, ), Kalamazoogenealogy.org, Mountain Home
Burials by Lot Numbers, Block: 6. http://kalamazoogenealogy.org/Cemeteries/Mountain%20Home%20Plots/6.htm#16.


– – – – – – – – – – – – – Disclaimer  – – – – – – – – – – – –
Bus

Bertha Barbara Trümpi Huber


Warning: preg_replace(): Compilation failed: nothing to repeat at offset 146 in /home/dontay6/public_html/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/class.photon.php on line 331
52 Ancestors #18 – Bertha Barbara Trümpi Huber (1884-1968)

Bio – Bertha Barbara Trümpi Huber

The umlaut helps to confuse Bertha’s records in America. Usually the umlaut is dropped and Trumpi is used, it is also Trumpe and sometimes Trumpy, misspellings include Trunpe. Bertha was born the oldest child of Bernhead Trumpe and Bertha Koch on 9 May 1894, in Ennenda, Glarus, Switzerland. We know nothing about her childhood, although we do know she “came from a big family and had a stepmother as her father married twice.
She is our most recent immigrant coming to America in 1903, when she was only 18 years old. She came in the care of an aunt and uncle who traveled from America to get her in Switzerland and bring her back. She then settled in Wisconsin where she met Johann (John) Huber. She married Johann on 2 March 1905 in New Glarius, Wisconsin,[1] most likely at the Swiss Church in New Glarus in an ecclesiastical ceremony by Rev. A. Roth. Anna Altman and Gebert Huber were the witnesses.
The young couple settled in Primrose, Dane county, Wisconsin. [2]
In April of 1908, she had her first child, a daughter, Florence Wilma Huber.
1909 ad for Baldwin County Colonization Co.
From Morning Star (Rockford, IL)   Page- 13 
Three Chicago businessmen formed the Baldwin County Colonization Company in 1903: Alexander Klappenback, F. W. Herdick, and Henry Bartling. They hoped to establish a German colony near Perdido Bay. In 1904, settlers were offered 20 and 40-acre portions of land.[3] They offered free trips to southern Alabama in February to people who bought land in the Colony.
The excitement of land of their own in the warmth of Alabama enticed the young family to move south in 1907 or 1908. Shortly after she and John located to Elberta, Baldwin County, Alabama, in 1908 she gave birth to her second child.[4]
Sometime between 1916 and 1920, the young family decided to return to the north and purchased a farm in James Township, Saginaw County, Michigan. After daughter died in 1934, their granddaughter came to live with them (Bertha, her husband, and her son Clarence). Bertha spoke Romansh, High German, and English. Her husband died in 1948. She continued to live at the James Township farm until she died from a coronary occlusion on 21 March 1964.
Bertha was buried in an unmarked grave at Oakwood Cemetery, Saginaw, Michigan. Section 116, Plot S692 on March 25th.
List of Great Ancestors
1.    Bertha Barbara Trümpi  
2.     Bernhead Trümpe

Sources:

[1] Wisconsin Marriage Records, Johana Huber and Bertha Trunpe, 02 Mar 1905.   .
[2] Wisconsin State Censuses, 1895 and 1905, Ancestry.Com
[3] Baldwin County, AL Genealogy Trails. See: http://genealogytrails.com/ala/baldwin/cities/elberta.html
[4] 1910 Census, Ancestry.com, http://www.Ancestry.com, Elberta and Josephine, Baldwin, Alabama; Roll: T624_1; Page: 5A; Enumeration District: 0013; FHL microfilm: 1374014.

Henry Brown (c. 1843- c. 1888)

52 Ancestors # 13 – William Henry Brown (1842-c. 1888)

Henry Brown is one of the most challenging of my ancestors to follow and figure out. Through the years I have confused him with others on several cases, establishing lines that weren’t correct. There are many researchers that have linked him as the son of Benjamin Brown and Eliza Fowler.  I agreed with that assessment for a long time, however, recently I’ve begun to think he was the son of Barney and Mary Brown. I am hoping that by writing this biography I will be able to solidify in my mind key relationships and provide the mechanism to provide proof for some of my assumptions.  

Biography – William Henry Brown (c. 1843- c. 1888)

With a name as common as Henry Brown, finding the right Henry Brown has always been a challenge.  
W. H. Brown (Henry) and his wife Marion are in the 1885 Census in Jamestown, Stutsman county, Dakota Territories. Their youngest son, Edward, was born in Dakota Territory about 1884  and their youngest daughter, Ada, was born in Michigan about 1882, so it appears they located to Dakota Territory about 1883.  I have been unsuccessful finding anything about Henry or Marion after 1885.  By 1900 their children appear to be scattered throughout the upper midwest with Arthur in Crow Wing county Minnesota, Charles in Montana, Clifford in Wisconsin, Clyde in Wells, ND, and Edward in Kidder county, ND. Tracking their other children may yield further results.  Henry & Marion don’t seem to appear in Find-a-Grave or any of the ND newspapers I’ve been able to search.  They just sort of vanish.
Property that Henry Brown probably rented.
Map courtesy of University of Michigan,
Digital Library Production Services 
The 1880 census shows Henry in Saline, Washtenaw county, Michigan. He was a 37 year-old farmer. With him is Marian and eight of his children, Arthur, Charles, Mary, Ahmond, Clifford, William, Clyde, & Addison. Of interest, his oldest, Nettie, does not appear with them in the 1880 Census, however, she does in the 1885 Dakota Census.  Frederick who shows in the 1885 census shows in the 1880 census as Addison. The 1880 census also indicates that his parents were both from New York.  Also, based upon the 1880 census and the neighbors and the 1870 census and his neighbors then, it appears that he was farming land owned by either Ezra Sanford (uncle of Marion) or possibly property of J. Perry (unknown relationship) as shown in an 1874 map of the Saline Village and area. You can also see that Chester Parson, Marian’s grandfather, owns a lot of the land in the area.
The 1870 census shows Henry in Saline with wife Marian and children Nettie and Arthur, as we would expect. Henry is 25 years old and his wife is 23.  Son Arthur is 7 months old, which confirms the December 1869 birth (Census was taken 2 Aug 1870). Neighbors included William Sanford (Marian’s father) and Peter Trim (P.E. Trim’s Est on the map). 
The 1860 census has long been problematic for me. For a long time I had believed that Henry was with his father Benjamin and mother Eliza (Fowler) in Vernon, Shiawassee county about 60 miles away from Saline.  I often wondered how Henry and Marian could have met — 60 miles is a long ways – but not impossible.  
After more research, I found another candidate for Henry in the 1860 Census in Saline.  17 year-old Henry W Brown shows up in the 1860 census living with Daney  and Mary E Brown. The age and place are right but the parents were born in the wrong states. As I mentioned  before the 1880 census indicates his parents were born in New York.  This 1860 census indicates his father born in New Hampshire and mother in New Jersey. Hummm — Not good. I had initially dismissed this family unit out of hand.  The conflict is mitigated in the 1850 census and find “Daney” as “Barney” and mother Mary born in New York instead of New Jersey. Also, the name of the child Henry W. changes to William H., which puts Henry’s name into the proper order and the W. H. Brown of the 1885 census makes sense. The 1870 Census doen’t show Barney/Daney, however, there is a Mary Brown (born in New York) of the right age living alone. So I think Barney/Daney passed between 1860 and 1970. 
If Henry was the child of Barney/Daney and Marion he would have several siblings, apparently a brother Myron O, sister Alice C, and brother David V.  His paternal grandmother would have been Jane.   
If Henry’s parentage was Barney/Daney and Mary instead of Benjamin and Eliza, he would have been born between July 5th and September 6th, 1842 (He was 8 on 6 Sep 1850 and 17 on 5 Jul 1960.) In 1870 he was 25 and in 1880 census he was 37 in 1885 and those dates I’m sure of.
Returning to the previously assumed Benjamin & Eliza parentage, we would find Henry as 7 years old in 1850 and 16 years old in 1860.  Again this doesn’t reconcile itself with his being 25 and 35 in 1870 and 1880. If correct that would put his birthdate between 15 June and 8 August 1843. 
Now the 1870 enumeration date was 2 August says Henry was 25 and the 1880 enumeration was 9 June and finds Henry as 37. 
So, If I consider the 1870 census incorrect, then the Henry whose childhood was in Saline fits and is the most likely.  
I’d love to hear from anyone who has more information or can otherwise can help me untangle these conflicts. Please feel free to comment below.

Short Bio – William Henry Brown (1842- c 1888)

William Henry Brown (Henry) was born between July 5th and September 6th, 1842 of Barney/Daney and Mary Brown in Saline, Washtenaw county, Michigan; He was the oldest of at least four children. 
By First Presbyterian Church (Saline, Mich.),
Nehemiah P. Stanton [Public domain],
via Wikimedia Commons
He married Marian Sanford about 1866.  They lived in Saline, having at least 10 children there. 
About 1883 they moved to North Dakota and had one more child there. Both he and his wife probably died before 1900. It is unknown where they are buried.

Future Research

Switch William Henry Brown to indicate different/parents in all my records. 
Flesh out the Barney/Daney Brown family unit.
Do a “deep dive” into William Henry Brown.
Sources: 
1850 Census – Barney Brown.
1850 Census – Benjamin Brown.
1860 Census – Daney Brown.
1860 Census – Benjamin Brown.
1870 Census – Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan – Henry Brown.
1880 Census – Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan – Henry Brown.
1885 Census – Dakota Territory, NDSU Archives, Page 44-018. Brown, W. H., et al.
Minnesota, Death Certificate #2215, Arthur D Brown.
University of Michigan’s Digital Library Production Services. – Pictorial History of Ann Arbor – Map of Saline Township. T.P. No. 4 S. Range No. 5 E [plat]; 1874