Biography: Clyde Leroy Brown

Today is the 119th anniversary of the birth of my Grand-Uncle, Clyde Leroy Brown. Born 12 Feb 1894, in Minnesota, he was the oldest of 13 children of Arthur Durwood and Mary Elizabeth Manning Brown. He grew up in Crow Wing County, Minnesota.
About 1902 he moved with his parents to Kidder County, North Dakota. 
Image of the 41st Infantry Division Insignia. Yellow on red backbround.
41st Infantry Division Insignia 

In May of 1917, Clyde enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard. His regiment, the North Dakota 1st (aka 164th Infantry Regiment of the 41st Infantry Division). On 1 May 1918, his regiment headed to Europe as part of The American Expeditionary Forces. In France, the 41st Division received disappointing news that they were designated a “replacement division” would not go into combat as a unit. In October 1918, Clyde was assigned to the 116th Supply Train, which was the first of three support assignments. The War ended on 11/11/1918. He remained in Europe for another nine months being assigned to the Provisional Motor Transport Company Unit, then finally, Motor Transport Company No. 831. Before leaving France, he married Yvonne Caumont. 

SS Imperator / USS Imperator
He and Yvonne arrived in New York aboard the USS Imperator on 10 Aug 1919. The Imperator was the largest ship of its day, being larger than the Titanic when it was built.  Clyde was discharged on 11 Aug 1919 at Hoboken, New Jersey. 
Clyde and Yvonne settled in Baxter, Crow Wing County, Minnesota. In the next ten years, they have moved to Rosing, Morrison County, Minnesota, USA and had seven children,

Marie
Clarence
Marcelle
William
Bernice
Artie 
Baby (name not known)

Clyde & Alice Brown
Yvonne died in January 1932. 
The intervening years are a mystery.  I haven’t been successful finding him in the 1940 census nor any other records until 5 Dec 1942, when he married Susan Harman in Crow Wing County, Minnesota.
He married Alice Marie Tyson about 1957.
He may have lived for a period in California, but by 1961 he returned to Minnesota and he lived on Route 4, Brainerd.
He retired from the Northern Pacific Railway Company.
Clyde died on 4 Aug 1971 in Crow Wing County and was buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Block 10,  Lot 87, Section: SEC.
For my sources please see Ancestry Sources File
If you have photos or additional information regarding Clyde Leroy Brown, please leave comments or email me directly.
Actions for the future:

Confirm the baby, name, and story.
Find Clyde and his children in the 1940 Census.
Investigate Susan Harman
Investigate Alice Tyson
See if he shows in any Northern Pacific Railway documents.

Ancestry Board opens Huber & Trumpi research

Sometimes the world opens up for you suddenly based upon a
tiny bit of information.
Johan (John) Huber & Bertha Barbara Trumpi
2 March 1905

I decided to focus upon John Huber and Bertha Trumpi.  They arrived in the States separately, both
in 1903. They settled in the Swiss Colonies of Wisconsin, were married, had a child, my wife’s
grandmother, while there. They moved to Alabama before 1910, had another child
there, then moved to Michigan before 1920. 
I had neither of their parent’s names, although because of some
photographs, I was pretty sure that John’s father was Jakob and possible names for his mother (Frieda & Kath).  I knew absolutely nothing on Bertha’s parents. 

I found them in the 1905 Wisconsin Census.  They were married by then and living in Dane
County, Wisconsin. From that I knew that married between 1903 and 1905. I searched and
searched and just couldn’t find them. I noticed a Johana marrying during the
time, but discounted that.  
I had recently taken a class, I think it was a Legacy webinar,
where the old surname boards on various systems were mentioned. The webinar reminded
me to be sure to use surname boards as a resource.  So, feeling frustrated about my not being
able to find John and Bertha’s  marriage
information , I posted a query to the (free) Ancestry Board – Dane County, Wisconsin. It was the first time I
had posted to a board in over a decade.  I
posted:

I’m looking for
information regarding the marriage of John Huber and Bertha Trumpi (Trumpy,
Trumphi). Bertha arrived in the US about 1903. She and John were married before
1 June 1905 most likely in Green or Dane County. They lived in Primrose, Dane
County in the 1905 Wisconsin Census.

I was astounded — In 8 hour and 10 minutes I had a reply.

Wisconsin
Marriage Records.Groom – Johana Huber born Windlack SwitzerlandHis father Jacob HuberHis mother Kath StuckingerMarried 2 March 1905 in New Glarus, Green Co.,
Wisconsin toBertha TrumpeFather Bernard TrumpeMother Bertha Koch
This would more than likely have taken place in
the Swiss Church in New Glarus…

Jakob Huber
Kath Huber
   
Of course, I felt stupid having seen Johana before. Knowing
the date I easily found the entries on Family Search.  (I don’t know why my searches for Trumpi,
Trumpy didn’t find her before. )  I thought
about ordering a copy of the certificate from Wisconsin. They want $20.00 and
will send you a copy of the certificate if
they find it.  (I’ve had bad
experiences with doing that in other states and didn’t want to go down that
path.)  I saw Family Search has the
microfilm available so I decided to order that media.  I’ve never ordered microfilm to look at at a
Family Heritage Center, so I thought I’d give that a try.  The film is still in processing, but I did find three other marriage records on the same film that I’m interested in
seeing as well. (All Trumpi’s in New
Glarus, Wisconsin.)  So, I’m looking forward to seeing the microfilm.  
In one fell swoop I
had solidified John/Johann’s parents names, which was really great because I
had a family photo that contained them. 
I just wasn’t certain until I found this index if they were
parents,  Uncle and aunt or what; now I’m sure.  The record also included Bertha’s parents
names.   It moves my Darling/Huber tree,  Generation 4, from 50% to 100%. I still have
to fill in a lot of blanks, but I at least have names, places and places to
start.
I looked for Bertha Trumpe and found a family tree
containing a “Bertha/Retha Trumpe” who came to the States in 1905 and
eventually moved to California.  Family
oral history indicated that Bertha’s mother came to the states and went out to
California.  I looked a little closer at
those entries and found that Retha came over from Glarus, Switzerland to see a
daughter, Bertha Trumpe, in New Glarus, Wisconsin.  I looked carefully at the 1900 and the 1910
census records and didn’t find anyone else named Bertha Trumpe near New Glarus so I’m sure it is the right parent.   
Retha came to the States very pregnant with three children.
She was so pregnant that on the second day of the trip, she gave birth to a
boy.  Of course, that give rise to the
question of why she would leave Switzerland when that pregnant. What happened
in Switzerland that still needs answers.  It was a descendent of the baby boy born on the cruise that had the tree, missing Bertha that tuned me into the family thing. 
I also wonder greatly why a Swiss family would move from Wisconsin to Alabama. Certainly against most migration patterns. That will take some more investigation. 
The tree I found indicated that Bertha/Retha Trumpi married
a Kaspar Hefti in 1914
Also, I see where other Hefti’s have married other Trumpi’s.
So there are many family relationships untangle.  It will
definitely keep me busy for a while. 
I’ll start what I call a deep dive for Trumpi’s in the New Glarus area
1880 to 1920 and see what I find.  It is
always exciting to find new cousins.
A quick, well focused question on the right location or
surname board can make a huge difference. 

Pete & Shirley’s Meeting

Pete & Shirley’s Meeting

[I recently asked Shirley how she and Pete met and about their wedding, who were the witnesses and why did they select that particular minister. The following is extracted from an eMail response from Shirley Howell dated 20 Jan 2013.]

Pete and Shirley met while Shirley was a student at American University. She worked at Colortone Press, an offset printer, as a receptionist/paste-up artist.  Her desk was a drawing board in the reception area.  Pete came in as a customer to order stationary and then called back later to invite her to have lunch. She agreed.  To her schoolgirl amazement, he took her to La Salle du Bois, then considered a most elegant restaurant in Washington. They piled caviar on her plate and she was very, very impressed.  They had another date.  Pete represented an adult world that Shirley was not used to, having previously only dated boys her age.  Pete was twelve years older, married, and had a (recently failed) export-import business. Pete said his wife was in Reno getting a divorce.  Pete took Shirley, in an almost formal way, to meet several of his friends and their wives. Through those meetings, Shirley confirmed what he was saying about his wife was true.
After dating for a few months, they decided to marry. They looked for a minister who would do it.  Things were more conservative then and many ministers would not marry divorcees. Pete’s father, a Baptist pastor, was willing to do it, but resistance from Shirley’s family was a barrier for him.  Aunt Betty was horrified and upset and absolutely would not come to the wedding, she said, nor would any of the rest of my family. So Pete’s family stayed away too, sympathetic but intent on doing what they felt was the right thing under the circumstances.
Bethesda Presbyterian Church
Bethesda, Maryland

They found a Presbyterian minister in Bethesda, which is near  American University, who was willing to marry them.  Several of Shirley’s college friends provided emotional and material support that Shirley needed. Two of them signed as witnesses at the wedding.

Georgia Virtual Vault & Edward Lamb McAllister

Georgia Virtual Vault 

I’m taking a genealogy course with the Cobb County Genealogical Society, with whom I am a member. Although I’ve done many webinars, but I’ve never taken an official class in genealogy.  I have been asked on a couple of occasions to give classes. I suppose I’ve been reluctant because I’ve not seen classes of this type put on by regular folks, only videos of professionals.  So, I thought I’d take the class mostly because I never had taken one before and because I thought I would pick up a few tidbits.  I am also new to the CCGC, so I thought I’d be a great opportunity to meet some of the people there. This class would be my first activity with the CCGC folks.
The first of two classes yesterday was on Census Records. It was an excellent class.  The instructor reminded me of the mortality schedules and the agriculture schedules.  I never look at them and I was reminded that I really should.  She did a short bit on Soundex codes and how they work. It was helpful and put it together more clearly for me. (See my frustration in a previous posting.) Really helpful was one of her Internet Resources Links that she suggested was the Soundex Calculator on the Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter site. I bookmarked the calculator and put the bookmark in my Genealogy Tools folder.  I feel bookmarks are so much easier than trying to remember where I put the paper instructions.  
During the class, I was reminded of the Georgia Virtual Vault and due to funding cuts the Georgia Archives is only open two days a week, the least of any state archive facility.  (Note: Contact your state legislators and ask they improve funding for the State Archives
None of my ancestors are from Georgia nor are my wife’s, so I’ve never done a lot with the Georgia Virtual Vault. I was reminded of it so I thought I’d refresh my memory of some of the things that the site has.  My wife’s great-grand uncle, Ted McAllister died in Georgia.  Family oral history said he had “bedded a married woman and was killed by a jealous husband.”  I wondered if the story was true. A quick search and there was his death certificate.  Cause of Death: Murder.  Wow.  Maybe the story is true. Another part of the story is that Harold, the husband of my wife’s Great-Grand Aunt, went down to take care of business and have his body returned to Pennsylvania for burial.  The death certificate shows who the informant was, not Ted’s brother-in-law as oral tradition would indicate but Ted’s youngest brother.  The death certificate also says he was widowed.  Interesting, I had no information on a wife or other family.  It also indicated he was buried in Laurel Grove Cemetery in Savannah.  I guess they didn’t ship the body back. 
He also worked as a car inspector for the “A. C. L. Ry”.  Not being from Georgia, I didn’t know what that was.  Over to Wikipedia – Oh, of Course, the Atlantic Coast Line Railway (Railroad).  
I did a search of McAllister in Laurel Grove Cemetery on Find-A-Grave (FAG) (one of my favorite sites) and quickly located a memorial for him.  The memorial spoke of his first wife, three children, and a second wife who died and was also buried in the cemetery.
Sadly, the memorial indicated that, “A findagrave volunteer reports that he is buried in an unmarked grave in Strangers Ground…- this is where county-paid burials are located.“  His wife is likewise in Strangers Ground so they must have been extremely poor. 
The FAG memorial It also mentioned his immigrating in 1886 and even mentioned the ship, “British King.”  In genealogy, one bit of information found leads to another and to another. 
British King
I knew he came across with his mother and three siblings in 1886, but I didn’t know the date, port, or ship. I’d give a quick look at Ancestry and see if they had the record.  Sure enough, there he was with his mother “Marg t” (instead of Margaret) and siblings. Arriving 23 June 1886 aboard the steamship “British King” from Liverpool to Philadelphia. Surprisingly, Ancestry didn’t have a photo of the British King but I found several elsewhere.
So hours pass, as I thoroughly document all these findings.  But,  so much more to research.  Can I confirm his two marriages?  What happened to his first wife, divorce or death?  Can I find the names of his three children? Did he have other children?  Can I find a newspaper article that speaks of his murder?  Was he really shot by a jealous husband?  

UPDATE

I did confirm, his wife Violet died in 1910. They had three children, Edward L., Albert W., and Paul Y. McAllister.  The Savannah Press, 13 January 1925 has a multipage article regarding his murder.  The article uses four headlines to really grab your attention.

Headlines:

Edward L. McAllister is Found Murdered in Home

Railroad man had been dead since Saturday

Beaten in head with hatchet; body on kitchen floor

Lived Alone since wife died last year

Edward L. McAllister, employed at the Atlantic Coast Line Railway shops, was discovered murdered at this home, on Thirty-ninth street near Ash by H. B. Brown…..

Now the question is who did it?  Was it a jealous husband as oral history indicated.  Oral history was wrong in that he hadn’t been shot, rather a hatchet to the head.  Much more personal than a shooting.  The article also mentions that his wife, who died the previous November, was under the care of the physician at the jail.  Why???  Always more questions.

Find a Grave & the Cobb County Cemetery Book.

Find a Grave & the Cobb County Cemetery Book.

I regularly volunteer to fulfill requests with Find A Grave. I love them and what they are doing. They are a great resource for unofficial death records.  They provide a great place to remember people who have past, and, most importantly, they are a source for photos of the markers of your ancestors.  If there is not a photo there, you can request one and a volunteer, like me, will go to the cemetery, take a photo of the marker, and upload it to the website. 
Some time ago I volunteered to photograph a marker.  I walked the entire cemetery and couldn’t find it.  I put it back into the queue figuring someone else would find it. Another person tried and marked the memorial that he couldn’t find it either.  Every time I went onto the Find A Grave site looking for markers that people want photos of there it was, staring at me.  Then I had an idea….
The Smyrna Historical and Genelogical Society has a small research library filled with books of genealogical interest.  Among the many books and magazines I found a book on Cobb County Cemeteries. Back in the 1980s, surveys were taken of the various cemeteries in Cobb County. This individual died in 1922 so she should have been listed.  She was listed as being in plot 12.  I also found that the other people in plot 12 were N.C. Meadows and Mattie Meadows.  Also in the plot were Catherine Loveless and Lula West. It is not a huge cemetery, but it isn’t that small either.  I wondered where plot 1 was so I could find plot 12 easily. 
From the book I wrote down…

1 – Pinson
2 – Byers
3 – Hanson
6 – Rakestraw
9 – Brown
12 – Meadows

I figured that with that information, I could find any of them and figure out the numbering scheme. 
I went up to the cemetery, drove slowly through the cemetery and didn’t see any of the names. I figured that meant that the numbering didn’t go horizontally across but rather from one corner away from the road. I parked the car near one of the corners and started to head to the corner. On the way I saw the Rakestraw marker and made a beeline to it. Yup. It looked about six plots away from the road. Three more markers up the hill was a Brown plot, I was getting close.  There they were, N.C. Meadows, Mattie Meadows, and a small unreadable marker.  Getting close to it I could just make out “AT REST”.  It was knocked partially over (down to about 30 degrees). I gently reached behind it and could feel lettering.  I carefully lifted the marker upright and could see it was the marker I was looking for.  I photographed it and set the marker back to vertical. It still faces out of the cemetery.  I figure that is what the family originally wanted. So, little infant Pauline remains “at rest” but a photo of her marker is now on Find A Grave.
Smyrna Museum
The Cobb County Cemeteries Book at the Smyrna Museum is one of many books that that can be of great assistance to your genealogical and volunteer activities.  Stop by during normal hours of operations and someone can assist you in the reference room. Stop by on a Tuesday morning (when I volunteer) and I’ll give you a brief tour.