Not all Google Searches are the Same

Donna Darling Collection – Part 8

Treasure Chest Thursday

By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.
When I first saw this clipping, I was immediately excited. This flyer not only showed the venue, and date but also the individual program.  I knew I didn’t have this venue before and that Donna did her “California Bathing Beauties” show in 1920 and 1921. I didn’t know where Kaufmann’s Gayety Theater was, but I figured it couldn’t be that tough, especially because I knew that Russell V. Wright was the manager.

Clipping of Gayety Theater program bill for "The California Bathing Beauties"I searched and searched and but couldn’t find which of the many Gayety Theatres it was—Baltimore, Boston, Chicago, Detroit, Los Angeles, or any many theaters in between. I thought sure I’d figure out which theater it was by searching for “Gayety Theatre” and either “Russell V. Wright” or “Russell Wright.” No luck. I knew it should be in “The Julius Cahn – Gus Hill Theatrical Guide.” Then I went to Google Books and searched. Bang! There it was. Although I was frustrated by the process, I was reminded of something I had known but forgot.  A regular Google search doesn’t return everything.  A search of “Gayety Theatre” Russell Wright” returns different results on Google than it does on Google Books. Google Books provided the answer I was looking for; Google did not. The Gayety Theatre in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada was managed by Russell Wright in the 1920s.

I looked at what was “On the Screen” at the bottom of the page.  Jacqueline Logan in “The House of Youth” and the short, “Monsieur Don’t Care” with Stan Laurel. Both films were released in 1924. So, this couldn’t have been a February 1921 show; it was the 1925 show.

The cast included the following individuals:

  • Al Ross
  • Alice Louise
  • Anita Walker
  • Betty Bryant
  • Clarice Allyn
  • Donna Darling
  • Mildred O’Brien
  • Murry Earle
  • And an unknown Lascoe

Learned: Donna Darling played in The California Bathing Beauties at Kaufmann’s Gayety Theatre in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada on February 9th and 10th, 1925.

Reminded:  Not all Google searches are the same. A regular search on Google does not include searching Google Books.

Biography – Karl Bauer (1885-1968)

By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.Sometimes it is necessary to take two steps back to answer questions. Although quite a lot was known about Karl Bauer, almost nothing was known about his siblings. Family oral history indicated he had a dozen or so siblings. The goal was to get to know about them. In order to do so, I needed to step back and get to know Karl’s life much better.  Through that process, I learned he had two sisters who lived and died in Germany before Karl immigrated. I also learned he had two sisters that came to America and lived in New York. Following is what I’ve learned about Karl’s life so far.

Hopfe-Bauer 2017 Project – Ancestor #06

List of Grandparents

  • Maternal Grandfather: Karl Bauer
  • 1st Great-Grandfather: Franz Bauer
  • 2nd Great-Grandfather: Jacob Bauer

Karl Bauer (1885-1968)

Karl Bauer was born on 16 Jan 1885 in Wolfstein, Bavaria, Germany to Franz and Margaretha (Licht) Bauer.

Childhood

He is believed to have had an older sister, Katharina, and a younger sister, Karoline. Further research is needed regarding his family in Germany.

In 1900, while he was about 15, he traveled to the United States and visited Pittsburgh, PA. The purpose of that visit and any family there is unknown.

Marriage

Wedding Photo of Anna Gunther & Karl Bauer circa 1909
Anna Günther & Karl Bauer c. 1909

He married Anna Elizabeth Güther on 30 December 1909 in Wolfstein, Germany.

Adulthood

Karl and Anna had two children before the war.

  • Emilie was born 26 September 1910 and died 8 Nov 2005 in Brookhaven, New York.
  • Irmgard Elizabeth was born 21 May 1913 and died in 1990 at Yaphank , New York.

Military

Photo of Karl Bauer in his Military Uniform
Karl Bauer – Military Uniform Photo from lbabeb via Ancestry.com

During World War 1, Karl served in the German Army. He was a musician. Further research is needed into his German military service.

Karl and Hanna had three more children after the war and before leaving for the United States.

  • Karl Walter was born 10 May 1920 and died 21 Nov 1987
  • Herbert was born in Jan 1921 and died six months later, on Christmas Day.
  • Reinhard was born in 1924.

Immigration

In January 1926, Karl left his wife and children in Wolfstein and immigrated to the United States aboard the S.S. Columbus. He planned his immigration to be permanent. He stayed with his brother-in-law, Eduard Brummel, at 2024 Grove Str, in Brooklyn, NY upon arrival.  In May, 1926, Karl formally renounced is allegiance to the German Empire and declared his intent to become a US Citizen.

Karl was musician and he is known to have played the violin throughout his life.

Photo of the S. S. Columbus
S.S. Columbus – By Bundesarchiv, Bild 102-00383 / CC-BY-SA 3.0, de, Via Wikimedia Commons

In January 1927, Karl’s wife Anna and three of their children, Emilie, Karl (Walter), and Reinhard (aka Reinhart) joined Karl at 229 Bleecher Street, Brooklyn. They also arrived aboard the S.S. Columbus. Irmgard also arrived in the United States in 1927, however, it doesn’t appear that she came with her mother and siblings aboard the S. S. Columbus. Today, 229 Bleecher Street is a police station.

The 1930 Census finds the Bauer family living at 229 Bleecher Street – Renting for $27/mo. There appears to be an error wherein Irmgard is identified at “Eugart” and a boy, however, the age and the rest of the family identifying information are correct. Also, in the household are Emmy, Walter, and Reinhart.

On 18 March 1931 Karl filed his petition for citizenship.

During the 1940 Census, Karl and Anna were in the same place since Anna arrived in 1927, 229 Bleecher Street, Brooklyn, NY.  Walter and Reinhard were still at home. Living with them was Anna’s mother, Anna Gunther, who was widowed and had been living with them since at least 1935.

In 1962, Karl and Anna moved to Oak Street in Yaphank, Suffolk County, New York, which is about 60 miles out on Long Island.

Death

Photo of marker of Karl & Anna Bauer
Marker – Bauer – Karl & Anna. Photo by Arleen Koello via Find a Grave

Karl died in November, 1968. His funeral service was held at Ruland Funeral Home in Patchogue. He was survived by his wife, four children, and two sisters. He is buried in Yaphank Cemetery, Yaphank, Suffolk County, New York. Anna Died in 1975 and was buried with Karl.

Further Actions / Follow-up

  • Research the siblings of Karl.
  • Find Karl’s 1900-1901 visit to Pittsburgh and determine the reason for the visit. Did he have family there?
  • Find Karl’s military record.
  • Learn more about the Bauers of Wolfstein, Germany.

Sources:

  • 1930 Census (A), Com, Carl Bauer – Brooklyn, Kings, New York.
  • 1940 Census (A), Com, Walter C Hopfe, Head. Year: 1940; Census Place: New York, Kings, New York; Roll: T627_2608; Page: 1A; Enumeration District: 24-2351
  • Find a Grave Memorial, Find a Grave, Karl Bauer Memorial# 38003122
  • Long Island Advance (Suffolk County, NY, ), NY Historic Newspapers, 1968-12-05 – Page 04, Column 1 – KARL BAUER.
  • New York, New York Passenger and Crew Lists, 1909, 1925­-1957, Family Search, Karl Bauer – S.S. Columbus – Bremen —New York – January 17, 1926.
  • New York, State and Federal Naturalization Records, 1794-1940, Com, Karl Bauer – Declaration 113938.
  • New York, State and Federal Naturalization Records, 1794-1940, Com, Karl Bauer – Petition #153989.
  • S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014, Ancestry.Com, Karl Bauer – 082-28-7795.
  • S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942, Karl Bauer – 16 Jun 1885 – Wolfstein, Germany.

Donna at the Bijou – New Haven, CT

Donna Darling Collection – Part 8

Treasure Chest Thursday
By Don Taylor

This week’s Treasure Chest Thursday is clipping regarding Donna and her Bathing Beauties playing at the Bijou. The accompanying clipping indicates that the article was in “THE NEW HAVEN JOU,” so it appears to be the Bijou of New Haven, Connecticut. A quick check of Cinema Treasures indicated that there was a Bijou Theater in New Haven at that time.[1]

The next question is when did she play there.  There is no date with the clipping. A search of the newspapers available online did not provide any help.  However, IMDb to the rescue. They indicate the movie was released on 7 November 1920.  Consequently, I would expect that this showing would have occurred sometime within two months of the release date. We also know that Donna played in Bridgeport, CT on December 29th & 30th and possibly on December 20th.  With that in mind, it fits that Donna and her Bathing Beauties played the Bijou in New Haven, CT sometime in November or December, 1920.

All attendance records were broken at the Bijou theater yesterday during the initial appearance of that bib combined all star vaudeville and moving picture bill, which is headed by Donna Montran and Her Bathing Beauties, and George Walsh in “The Plunger.” There isn’t a dull moment on the bill and yesterday’s audiences showed their appreciation by prolonged applause throughout the entire performance.

Donna Montran and Her Bathing Beauties lived up to all the good things that had been said about them and presented a production that was a delight to the eye.

Also on the bill:

  • Katheyn Arnold and George L. Cohan.
  • Henry Sykes
  • Billy Bowman
  • The Carpas Bros.

New Engagement Added:

Unknown Date: [Nov-Dec] 1920 – New Haven, CT – Bijou – Donna Montran and Her Bathing Beauties.


References:

  1. Cinema Treasurers – Bijou Theater – 28 Church Street, New Haven, CT 06510
  2. IMDb – The Plunger Release Date: 7 November 1920.

Probate Record for Timothy Munsell

Anamnesis Monday
Transcripts by Don Taylor

Cover page for Timothy Munsel Probate DocumentsProbate records are wonderful when you can find them as they provide so much detail and texture about an individual’s life.  I just loved learning that Timothy Munsell‘s family spent a dollar (6 shillings) for “Spirits.”  I also learned the things he had that were of importance. Apparently, no horse but he did have two hogs.

Ancestry.Com is a great resource for Wills and Probate Records. These images come from “Connecticut, Wills and Probate Records, 1609-1999” original data from “Connecticut County, District and Probate Courts.” For all the images and higher quality images see Ancestry.Com. (You must have Ancestry account or be using a library account to access.)

 

Image 1204 – Inventory

Lyme Nov 20th 779

Inventory of Estate of Timothy Munsell

Late of Lyme Deceased

                               £  s  p

  • Wearing apparel 2-12-0
  • Bed & Bedding     2-10—
  • Pewter ware              6
  • Crockery Ditto         6
  • Iron ware                 16
  • Tables & Chairs      12
  • Cupboard & Drawers     6
  • Old Iron                     6
  • Wheel Skeel              3
  • 1 Old Case                 6
  • 1 Lanthorn                2
  • 1 Hogg  150 ?? ? 1-17-6
  • 1 Ditto 50 ??          12-6
  • 5 Bushels Corn     15
  • 1 Bible & Psalm Book     4
  • 1 Pair Heelyard     2
  • Forrage                  1-4
  • Land                       3

———

[Total]                   £ 16-0-0

Elisha Rice

Reynold Peck

Accept’d and called to the above amount execbty(?)
Only the land is allowed to the widow for ????
by order of the judge attest – L. Law Ats


Image 1210 – Receipt

Receipt – One Dollar for Spirits

 

Received Lyme Oct 27 – 1798

Elisheehia Munsell one dollar for spirits

 

 

If you have any suggested corrections to my transcriptions, please feel free to use the comment form below.

 

A Dollar for Spirits? – Timothy Munsell (1745-1798)

Howell-Darling-2017 Research

Darling/Munsell Line
By Don Taylor

IPhoto of Don Taylor with cat Nasi. have often wonder how money worked in the post-colonial period.  I know originally there were 20 shillings in a pound, but the old pounds and shillings worked in comparison with dollars. I’ve read many descriptions that read like a technical journal – “how many grains or grams were in something….” I knew that the early Americans had to have a simple system for day-to-day conversion, but it eluded me until I looked at the probate record of Timothy Munsell.  In the records, there was a list of expenses done in pounds, shillings, and pence and the receipts for payment were done in dollars. Building the casket cost 2 dollars, but was entered as 12 shillings in the ledger.  Likewise, digging the grave cost one dollar, but was entered as 6 shillings in the ledger. Simple. No more confusion on my part.  It is clear, from looking at the ledger, that a pound is 20 shillings and 12 pence makes a shilling.  Again simple.

Receipt – One Dollar for Spirits – Connecticut, Wills and Probate Records, 1609-1999 for Timothy Munsell – Image 1210.

However, with genealogy, when one thing becomes clear, often something else leaps up and confuses me. In this case, there was an expense for “spirits.” I just don’t understand enough about 18th-century burial practices to know what this really means. Was this the cost of the process to clean and wrap the body and prepare the spirit for its journey? Or was this payment for the booze for a spirited party following the burial?  Either seems possible, but I suspect it was the latter. However, a dollar (6 shillings) doesn’t seem like that much of a party, even in 1798 money. I would love to hear from anyone that had a definitive source for my understanding this conflict.

Howell Darling 2016 – Ancestor #98

List of Grandparents

 

Timothy Munsell (1745-1798)

The Munsell surname is also spelled Munsill, Monsell, and, sometimes, Maunsell. Regardless of record, I have standardized on the Munsell spelling.

Birth

Timothy Munsell was born on 24 Nov 1745 to John and Mary (unknown) Munsell.[i]

Nothing is known of Timothy’s childhood.

Adulthood

Timothy married Eleshiba Smith on 11 Feb 1768 in Lyme, New London, Connecticut Colony.[ii]

There is some confusion regarding the children of Timothy and Eleshiba, their number and their birthdates. I have settled upon the following:

            NAME                                    Birth               Comments

  • William Wescott Munsell     24 Jan 1770
  • James Munsell                        28 Jun 1773
  • Anna Munsell                          07 Sep 1775
  • Timothy Munsell                     16 Apr 1778
  • Sally Ann Munsell             1780              3rd Great Grandmother
  • James Andross Munsell         09 Jul 1781
  • Thomas Munsell                       1784                 “Supposed son”

I suspect that James (b. 1773) probably died before 1781 thus freeing up the given name of James for James Andross in 1781.  James Andross was also known as Andress, Andrus, and Andrew Munsell so it may be that James for James Andross was a confusion in some records. Further investigation is needed to clear up that question.

Some records indicate that Timothy Munsell may have served during the Revolutionary War as a private for Connecticut. However, The Daughters of the American Revolution have provided notice for ancestor #A082980 which states: THIS LINE MAY NOT BE USED FOR MEMBERSHIP IN THE DAR. It appears there were two Timothy Munsells in Lyme, CT, during the revolutionary war. One was born in 1735 and appears to have served while our Timothy Munsell was born in 1748 and did not serve.

Timothy Munsell died on 26 Oct 1798 in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut.

He was buried before 12 November 1798 in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut.[iii]

His burial cost $2 for the casket, $1 to dig the grave, and $1 for the spirits. [iv]

His land was appraised at £3. His personal property was valued at £12. His wearing apparel was the most valuable, worth £2 12s. His bed and bedding, valued at £2 10s, and a hogg, valued at £1, 17s, 6p, were the top valued items of personal property.[v]

I currently have 23 individuals with the surname Munsell identified and 69 known direct descendants of Timothy and Eleshiba (Smith) Munsell.

Ancestry DNA

Looking at Ancestry DNA, I viewed Shirley’s closest DNA Matches that have trees with the Munsell surname and found the following cousins.

  1. W1 – Shares 61 cM – Common Ancestor Abner and Sally Anne (Munsell) Darling.
  2. M0 – Shares 31 cM – Common Ancestor – Unknown ancestor of William J Munsell?
  3. GS – Shares 25 cM – Common Ancestor Abner and Sally Anne (Munsell) Darling.
  4. SM – Shares 24 cM – Conflict. Sally Ann Munsel with the spouse of Warren Darling.

(Note: For privacy concerns, I only use initials of individuals matched.

 

Further Actions / Follow-up

  • Follow-up on children of Timothy Munsell. Did he have two children named James? If so, did the first James died before the second James was born?
  • Learn why Timothy Munsell is no longer accepted as Revolutionary War Ancestor. It appears to relate somehow to John Munsell b. 7-16-1735 Lyme, CT, d. 7-17-1819.[vi]
  • Follow and document the Ancestry DNA descendant lines resolve any conflicts and add linkage into William J. Munsell’s ancestry.

Endnotes

[i] Munsell, Frank, Genealogy of the Munsell family (Munsill, Monsell, Maunsell) in America, Internet Archive, Page 173 – Timothy Munsell born in 1745. https://archive.org/details/genealogyofmunse00muns.

[ii] New London Vital Records – Page 315 – Timothy Munsell.

[iii] Connecticut, Wills and Probate Records, 1609-1999 (, 2015), Ancestry.com, Timothy Munsell – Image 1206.

[iv] Connecticut, Wills and Probate Records, 1609-1999, Ancestry.com, Timothy Munsell – Image 1208.

[v] Connecticut, Wills and Probate Records, 1609-1999, Ancestry.com, Timothy Munsell – Image 1204.

[vi] Daughters of the American Revolution – Genealogy Research – Ancestor Search – Munsell, Timothy – Ancestor #: A082980 – http://services.dar.org/public/dar_research/search_adb/?action=full&p_id=A082980