Mary-Alice’s ThruLines – Part 2

DNA
ThruLines Thursday
Howell-Hobbs

This week I took a look at some of my wife’s Ancestry DNA matches and some of her ThruLinestm results.

DNA Matches

There were no new matches in her 2nd cousins and closer, so I started looking at her third cousins.

The first three were 3rd to 4th cousin.

Individual cM shared on x Segments Line Comments
3C = 3rd Cousin
D. L. 196 cM 11 Seg Hobbs 3C – Samuel Aquilla & Martha Ann (Bryan) Long.
C. C. 179 cM 8 Seg (Howell?) No Tree – I’m awaiting response to contact email. 
J-7 166 cM 9 Seg Hobbs No Tree – I’m awaiting response to contact email.

ThruLinestm

No new connections on her grandparents.

For her great-grandparents, there were 2 matches for her Howell/Vinson line and 3 for her Hobbs/Long line. There were no new individuals on her Darling, McAllister, Huber, or Trümpi lines.

Howell Line

Both of the individuals connect via Grandpa Howell’s sister Anna Lee Howell. One indicates that he is descended from William J. Boseman and the other indicates he is descended from Virginia L. Roseman.  My records indicate that Anna Lee married William Boseman in 1886 and had three children with the Boseman surname, Maggie, William, and Jesse. After that, my records show that she had five children with the surname Roseman. I’m not showing that Anna had a second marriage or showing any other reason for the surname change.

That lets me know I need to look more closely at Anna Lee Howell and her life and her children. Also, I’ll look more closely at William Jackson Boseman (1888-1962) and Virginia L Roseman (1905-___) and see if I can untangle the surname.

Hobbs Line

There were three ThruLinestm matches along the Hobbs line. All three were through great-aunt Annie Hobbs (1872-1953) who married Frank Alton Armstrong, Sr in 1890. They had three children, their oldest, Hazel G Armstrong (1895-1997). Hazel married Itimous Thaddus Valentine (1887-1970) and had five children that I am aware of. One of those children (possibly living) had at least four children, two of whom tested and were already in my (private) tree. The third person matching is J.H. a great-grandchild of Hazel through one of the other children (possibly living). I didn’t have him in my tree, but I did have his mother in my private tree, so I’m confident enough in his relationship to add him to my tree.

DNA Relationship

ThruLinestm indicates that both are second cousins twice removed. DNA Painter’s Shared cM Project 3.0 tool v4 indicates that 2C2R should share between 0 and 261 cM of DNA with an average being 74cM. The ThruLines match “RC” and my wife share 52 cM and the second match shares 60 cM; so the proposed relationship fits the amount of DNA shared.

Conclusion

Genetic matches and TrueLines confirmed several people in my tree. It let me know that I need to further research three ancestors on a secondary line, and it allowed me to confidently add one new cousin.

Final Comment

If you are a descendant of Peter Fletcher Howell (1842-1924), I’d love to learn how you and my wife are related. Testing with Ancestry DNA is an excellent way for us to confirm our relationship and possibly you broaden your tree as well.

My other ThruLines posts are listed under the ThruLines Thursday category.

Disclaimer

The ads and some of the links on this website are “affiliate links.” If you purchase after clicking on them, I will receive a small commission which will help me pay for this site. Please see my Disclaimer Page for more information.

ThruLines – Darling Part 2 – Bernard & Bertha Trumpi

ThruLines Thursday
Darling-Huber-Trumpi/Koch
DNA

By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.In Part 2 of my Darling ThruLinestm analysis, I’m looking closely at matches with wife’s maternal 2nd great-grandparents, Bernard[i] Trümpi (1844-1913) and Bertha (Koch) Trümpi (1862-1927).

ThruLinestm indicated that there are 3 (newly discovered) cousins who match Shirley through the Trümpi line.

J. S. Descended from Bebetta Trümpi

J. S. and Shirley share 15 cM of DNA on one chromosome, which is a very small amount.

ThruLinestm suggests that the connection is through great-aunt Babetta Trumpi. Babetta was the second of the seven children of Bernard and Bertha. Babetta also had another seven half-siblings from Bernard’s first marriage.  She was born 9 Oct 1888, emigrated to the United States Oct 1905, and married Wilhelm Fuchs on 16 Nov 1906 in Winnebago, Illinois. They had at least eight children, one of whom was Walter Fuchs. Walter died sometime before 2006.

Through the tree of J. S., I learned that Walter married Katherine Welty and had children, one of whom was J. S.’s grandparent.

With the suggested tree, J. S. would be a 2nd cousin 2x (2C2X) removed. Genetically, a 2C2X should share between 0 and 261 cM, which is in the expected range but is a very low amount. DNA Painter suggests a 7.5% probability for this relationship.

L. C. Descended from Freida A. Trumpi

L. C. and Shirley share 112 cM of DNA on 7 segments. Much more in keeping with what I would expect from a 2nd cousin.

ThruLinestm suggests that the connection is through great-aunt Frieda A Trümpi. Frieda was the fourth of the seven children of Bernard and Bertha. Freida also had another seven half-siblings from Bernard’s first marriage.  She was born 9 Aug 1895, emigrated to the United States in 1906, and married Adolph John Karch on 27 Feb 1913 in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois. They had at least five children, one of whom was Albert Adolph Karch (1913-1963). Walter died sometime before 2006. L. C. is one of Walter’s children.

Thus, the paper trail also suggests that L.C. and Shirley are 2nd Cousins. They share 112 cM of material across 7 segments, which fits within the range (46-515) expected for 2nd cousins, but at the low end (8.9% likelihood).

K.B. Descended from Freida A. Trumpi

K.B. and Shirley share 23 cM of DNA on 2 segments.

ThruLinestm suggests that the connection is also through great-aunt Frieda A Trümpi. I mentioned Frieda under L.C.’s relationship. Another of Frieda and Aldolph’s children was Elinor Frieda Karch (1914-1998). Elinor married John Patrick McCarthy and they had at least one child, Marcella Rae Whitmore (1935-1998).  Marcella is K.B.’s grandmother.

Thus, the paper trail also suggests that L.C and Shirley are 2C2R. They share 23 cM of material across 2 segments which fits within the range (0-261) expected for 2nd cousins, twice removed, but again, at the low end (8.3% likelihood).

Conclusion

I find it interesting that all of these ThruLinestm connections include much less DNA than would be expected. All within norms, but all in the bottom 10% for the paper relationship. That makes me wonder if there might be some event that would reduce the amount of DNA shared significantly. This might be a good candidate for chromosome mapping. I have a “gut feeling” that I have something wrong and that Bernard had two wives name Bertha.[ii] If so, that Babetta and Freida’s descendants had less shared DNA than expected would make sense.

Finally, if you are a descendant of Bernard Trümpi (1844-1913) or Bertha (Koch) Trümpi (1862-1927), please consider testing with Ancestry DNA; it is an excellent genealogical resource, which may help you broaden your tree.

All of my ThruLines posts are listed under the ThruLines Thursday category.

Disclaimer

The ads and some of the links on this website are “affiliate links.” If you purchase after clicking on them, I will receive a small commission which will help me pay for this site. Please see my Disclaimer Page for more information. Continue reading “ThruLines – Darling Part 2 – Bernard & Bertha Trumpi”

Darling DNA – ThruLines – Part 1

ThruLines Thursday
Darling
DNA

My Wife’s Darling-Swayze-McAllister-Lamb Line

Introduction

DNA image by Caroline Davis2010 via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

My wife’s mother has had her DNA tested, so rather than using my wife’s matches, I’m going to use her mother’s matches to focus on my wife’s maternal line. It will provide closer and better matches on that like. Consequently, I’m starting with my wife’s great-great-grandparents, my mother-in-law’s great-grandparents.

One of the problems with ThruLines is that it only considers individuals that match genetically AND have a tree at Ancestry where the individual had identified which person is them. So, my wife’s half-aunt who did test with Ancestry doesn’t show up at all because she doesn’t have a tree. Because of that, there were no matches with my wife’s four maternal great-grandparents (other than my wife’s mother).

DNA Relationships

Likewise, there were no ThruLines matches with my wife’s Darling or Swayze 2nd great-grandparents. However, there were three matches on the McAllister/Lamb lines.

There is “CM,” who is a 2nd cousin of my wife’s mother and is well known to us. The 101 cM of DNA shared between them is well within the expected range for 2nd cousins.  No surprise there.

The other two are descendants of my mother-in-law’s great-uncle Joseph McAllister.  “CK” and my mother-in-law share 176 cM of DNA across 11 segments and “IG” and my mother-in-law share 99 cM of DNA across 4 segments. Both within the range expected for second cousins to share. Both “CK” and “IG” were unknown cousins before the DNA test match results, however, both their parents were known.

Conclusion

If you are a descendant of Rufus Holton Darling (1815-1857), Elizabeth Jane Swayze (1818-1896), Peter McAllister (1852-1941), or Margaret Mary Lamb (1850-1929),  please consider testing with Ancestry DNA; it is an excellent genealogical resource and can help you broaden your tree too. I’d love to learn how you and my wife are related.

Disclaimer

The ads and some of the links on this website are “affiliate links.” If you purchase after clicking on them, I will receive a small commission which will help me pay for this site. Please see my Disclaimer Page for more information.

All of my ThruLines posts are listed under the ThruLines Thursday category

ThruLines – William Henry Brown – Part 4

ThruLines Thursday
Brown
DNA
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.

In Part 4 of my ThruLinestm analysis of my 2nd great-grandfather, William Henry Brown, I’m looking closely at the matches descended from Edward Waberton Brown. Ed was born in Dakota Territory in 1884 shortly after his parents moved from Saline, Michigan to the Dakota Territory. North Dakota became a state five years later, in 1889. Edward married Dertha Merkel on 3 November 1901. The two had 13 (or 14) children. Five of those children have descendants that have tested with Ancestry. I was surprised to learn that all five were females. Three of the individuals are 2nd cousins once removed (105, 97, & 70 cM shared), one is a 3rd cousin (37 cM shared), and one is a 3rd cousin once removed (18 cM shared). All five share an amount of DNA with me that I would expect based upon the relationship.[i]

Cousin via Lenora B. Brown

“CJ” has minimal tree on Ancestry. It does provide his/her parents names and his or her maternal grandmother’s name which links him to Edward Warberton Brown. There were no new facts regarding “CJ’s” ancestors nor sources for the facts held. As such, I was only able to add him to my list of cousins (with a note of the amount of DNA we share).

Cousin via Edna Winnifred Brown

“JC” has a very minimal tree on Ancestry. It does provide his/her parents names and his maternal grandfather’s name. There were no sources for any of his/her facts. As such, I was only able to add him to my list of cousins.

Cousin via Virginia M. Brown

“BP” has a nice tree that clearly connected to Virginia Marion Brown to Edward Waberton Brown, and to Henry William Brown. Thanks to the tree of “BP” I was able to identify three new cousins, including “BP.”

Cousin via Ada Brown

“GH” is a 3rd cousin, with whom I share 37 cM across 4 segments, is a double cousin.  We share William Henry and Marion (Sanford) Brown; we also share Enoch and Minerva Ann (Tolliver) Mannin (my 2nd great-grandparents). These lines are not related to each other, but many of their descendants are related to both. “GH” was the only cousin I was able to add to my tree.

Cousin via Emma Cecelia Brown

“AD” is a 3rd cousin, once removed, with whom I share 18 cM on one segment of DNA. I had much of this person’s tree already as I had researched some of this line previously. It is another case where two brothers (Harry and Floyd) married two sisters (Emma and Ruth Brown) and I had reviewed Floyd and Ruth previously. I was able to follow this line down to “AD” and add 12 new cousins to my tree, including “AD.”

Conclusion

If you are a descendant of Edward Warberton Brown (ca. 1884-1965) please consider testing with Ancestry DNA; it is an excellent genealogical resource and can help you broaden your tree too. I’d love to learn how we are related.

All of my ThruLines posts are listed under the ThruLines Thursday category. Continue reading “ThruLines – William Henry Brown – Part 4”

ThruLines – William Henry Brown – Part 3

ThruLines Thursday
Brown
DNA

In this look at my ThruLinestm results, I’m looking closer at matches, who I have in common with my great-great-grandparents’, William Henry & Marion (Sanford) Brown’s son, Clyde Hewett Brown. Clyde was born in April 1877 in Michigan, he married Phoebe Jane Manning in 1898 and they had two children. He died sometime before 1903. Clyde was the brother of my great-grandfather, Arthur, and Phoebe was the sister of my great-grandmother, Mary. So, this is a case where two brothers married two sisters.

Clyde and Phoebe had two children. Estella May Brown and Henry L. Brown. Estella married Zachariah Ariah Barnett and they had six children. Three of those children have descendants that have tested with Ancestry and have connected themselves to an Ancestry Tree—Mildred, Hazel, and Phoebe.

Analysis

The trees of each of these individuals are consistent with I have from my own sources. As such, all three appear to be third cousins, one twice removed and two once removed.

Mildred Merie Barnett (1917-2003) – Identical to my records.
TW[i] is a 3rd cousin, once removed, who shares 37 cM on two segments. My records already had her, her parents, and her grandparents, from another source. Looking at TW’s tree I found nothing new, however, the shared DNA confirms the relationship.

Hazel Idella Barnett (1922-2001) – Identical to my records.
JH is a 3rd cousin, twice removed, who shares 29 cM on three segments. Additionally, I have JH’s grandfather’s information. I don’t know who JH’s father is, but I can add him as a Living Unknown to my tree and then JH as a DNA Match.

Phebe E Barnet (____-____) – Similar to my Phoebe Elizabeth Barnett (1933-2007)
LI is a 3rd cousin, once removed, with whom I share 56 cM on 4 segments. LI has the same name for her grandmother, but has no new information regarding Phoebe nor her descendants. There is no way to determine who which of the five children I know about for Phoebe, so I don’t know how this match connects exactly. I’ve messaged LI to ask about which of the children of Phoebe is LI’s mother.

Conclusion

Thanks to ThruLines, I’ve been able to add 2 new third cousins, which broadens my tree.

Afterword

If you are a descendant of Clifford Gerome Brown, please consider testing with Ancestry DNA; it is an excellent genealogical resource and can help you broaden your tree too. If you have tested with Ancestry, but haven’t linked yourself to an Ancestry tree, please do so. I’d love to learn how we are related.

All of my ThruLines posts are listed under the ThruLines Thursday category. Continue reading “ThruLines – William Henry Brown – Part 3”