Bertha Barbara Trümpi Huber


Warning: preg_replace(): Compilation failed: nothing to repeat at offset 146 in /home/dontay6/public_html/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/class.photon.php on line 331
52 Ancestors #18 – Bertha Barbara Trümpi Huber (1884-1968)

Bio – Bertha Barbara Trümpi Huber

The umlaut helps to confuse Bertha’s records in America. Usually the umlaut is dropped and Trumpi is used, it is also Trumpe and sometimes Trumpy, misspellings include Trunpe. Bertha was born the oldest child of Bernhead Trumpe and Bertha Koch on 9 May 1894, in Ennenda, Glarus, Switzerland. We know nothing about her childhood, although we do know she “came from a big family and had a stepmother as her father married twice.
She is our most recent immigrant coming to America in 1903, when she was only 18 years old. She came in the care of an aunt and uncle who traveled from America to get her in Switzerland and bring her back. She then settled in Wisconsin where she met Johann (John) Huber. She married Johann on 2 March 1905 in New Glarius, Wisconsin,[1] most likely at the Swiss Church in New Glarus in an ecclesiastical ceremony by Rev. A. Roth. Anna Altman and Gebert Huber were the witnesses.
The young couple settled in Primrose, Dane county, Wisconsin. [2]
In April of 1908, she had her first child, a daughter, Florence Wilma Huber.
1909 ad for Baldwin County Colonization Co.
From Morning Star (Rockford, IL)   Page- 13 
Three Chicago businessmen formed the Baldwin County Colonization Company in 1903: Alexander Klappenback, F. W. Herdick, and Henry Bartling. They hoped to establish a German colony near Perdido Bay. In 1904, settlers were offered 20 and 40-acre portions of land.[3] They offered free trips to southern Alabama in February to people who bought land in the Colony.
The excitement of land of their own in the warmth of Alabama enticed the young family to move south in 1907 or 1908. Shortly after she and John located to Elberta, Baldwin County, Alabama, in 1908 she gave birth to her second child.[4]
Sometime between 1916 and 1920, the young family decided to return to the north and purchased a farm in James Township, Saginaw County, Michigan. After daughter died in 1934, their granddaughter came to live with them (Bertha, her husband, and her son Clarence). Bertha spoke Romansh, High German, and English. Her husband died in 1948. She continued to live at the James Township farm until she died from a coronary occlusion on 21 March 1964.
Bertha was buried in an unmarked grave at Oakwood Cemetery, Saginaw, Michigan. Section 116, Plot S692 on March 25th.
List of Great Ancestors
1.    Bertha Barbara Trümpi  
2.     Bernhead Trümpe

Sources:

[1] Wisconsin Marriage Records, Johana Huber and Bertha Trunpe, 02 Mar 1905.   .
[2] Wisconsin State Censuses, 1895 and 1905, Ancestry.Com
[3] Baldwin County, AL Genealogy Trails. See: http://genealogytrails.com/ala/baldwin/cities/elberta.html
[4] 1910 Census, Ancestry.com, http://www.Ancestry.com, Elberta and Josephine, Baldwin, Alabama; Roll: T624_1; Page: 5A; Enumeration District: 0013; FHL microfilm: 1374014.

Ancestry Board opens Huber & Trumpi research

Sometimes the world opens up for you suddenly based upon a
tiny bit of information.
Johan (John) Huber & Bertha Barbara Trumpi
2 March 1905

I decided to focus upon John Huber and Bertha Trumpi.  They arrived in the States separately, both
in 1903. They settled in the Swiss Colonies of Wisconsin, were married, had a child, my wife’s
grandmother, while there. They moved to Alabama before 1910, had another child
there, then moved to Michigan before 1920. 
I had neither of their parent’s names, although because of some
photographs, I was pretty sure that John’s father was Jakob and possible names for his mother (Frieda & Kath).  I knew absolutely nothing on Bertha’s parents. 

I found them in the 1905 Wisconsin Census.  They were married by then and living in Dane
County, Wisconsin. From that I knew that married between 1903 and 1905. I searched and
searched and just couldn’t find them. I noticed a Johana marrying during the
time, but discounted that.  
I had recently taken a class, I think it was a Legacy webinar,
where the old surname boards on various systems were mentioned. The webinar reminded
me to be sure to use surname boards as a resource.  So, feeling frustrated about my not being
able to find John and Bertha’s  marriage
information , I posted a query to the (free) Ancestry Board – Dane County, Wisconsin. It was the first time I
had posted to a board in over a decade.  I
posted:

I’m looking for
information regarding the marriage of John Huber and Bertha Trumpi (Trumpy,
Trumphi). Bertha arrived in the US about 1903. She and John were married before
1 June 1905 most likely in Green or Dane County. They lived in Primrose, Dane
County in the 1905 Wisconsin Census.

I was astounded — In 8 hour and 10 minutes I had a reply.

Wisconsin
Marriage Records.Groom – Johana Huber born Windlack SwitzerlandHis father Jacob HuberHis mother Kath StuckingerMarried 2 March 1905 in New Glarus, Green Co.,
Wisconsin toBertha TrumpeFather Bernard TrumpeMother Bertha Koch
This would more than likely have taken place in
the Swiss Church in New Glarus…

Jakob Huber
Kath Huber
   
Of course, I felt stupid having seen Johana before. Knowing
the date I easily found the entries on Family Search.  (I don’t know why my searches for Trumpi,
Trumpy didn’t find her before. )  I thought
about ordering a copy of the certificate from Wisconsin. They want $20.00 and
will send you a copy of the certificate if
they find it.  (I’ve had bad
experiences with doing that in other states and didn’t want to go down that
path.)  I saw Family Search has the
microfilm available so I decided to order that media.  I’ve never ordered microfilm to look at at a
Family Heritage Center, so I thought I’d give that a try.  The film is still in processing, but I did find three other marriage records on the same film that I’m interested in
seeing as well. (All Trumpi’s in New
Glarus, Wisconsin.)  So, I’m looking forward to seeing the microfilm.  
In one fell swoop I
had solidified John/Johann’s parents names, which was really great because I
had a family photo that contained them. 
I just wasn’t certain until I found this index if they were
parents,  Uncle and aunt or what; now I’m sure.  The record also included Bertha’s parents
names.   It moves my Darling/Huber tree,  Generation 4, from 50% to 100%. I still have
to fill in a lot of blanks, but I at least have names, places and places to
start.
I looked for Bertha Trumpe and found a family tree
containing a “Bertha/Retha Trumpe” who came to the States in 1905 and
eventually moved to California.  Family
oral history indicated that Bertha’s mother came to the states and went out to
California.  I looked a little closer at
those entries and found that Retha came over from Glarus, Switzerland to see a
daughter, Bertha Trumpe, in New Glarus, Wisconsin.  I looked carefully at the 1900 and the 1910
census records and didn’t find anyone else named Bertha Trumpe near New Glarus so I’m sure it is the right parent.   
Retha came to the States very pregnant with three children.
She was so pregnant that on the second day of the trip, she gave birth to a
boy.  Of course, that give rise to the
question of why she would leave Switzerland when that pregnant. What happened
in Switzerland that still needs answers.  It was a descendent of the baby boy born on the cruise that had the tree, missing Bertha that tuned me into the family thing. 
I also wonder greatly why a Swiss family would move from Wisconsin to Alabama. Certainly against most migration patterns. That will take some more investigation. 
The tree I found indicated that Bertha/Retha Trumpi married
a Kaspar Hefti in 1914
Also, I see where other Hefti’s have married other Trumpi’s.
So there are many family relationships untangle.  It will
definitely keep me busy for a while. 
I’ll start what I call a deep dive for Trumpi’s in the New Glarus area
1880 to 1920 and see what I find.  It is
always exciting to find new cousins.
A quick, well focused question on the right location or
surname board can make a huge difference. 

Mom’s Memories 2

I was recently reading one of my favorite blogs, Marian’s Roots and Rambles. Her article was about “Any Sailors in the Family.”  I was a sailor, did 10 years active duty in the US Navy, but more interesting, I learned recently that my mother was a sailor as well.  She mentioned that somewhere or another she had gotten “seaman’s papers.” (I’ll have to look and see if I can figure out how to get a copy of them.)  She worked on a ferry boat on the Great Lakes.  In the early 1950’s she cooked aboard the SS Milwaukee Clipper. The ‘Clipper was an auto/train car (and passenger) ferry that ran between Muskegon, Michigan and Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She cooked and baked in the breads department and lived shipboard a season.  Of course, I was astonished and amazed.  It provided her with a place to stay (albeit cramped), meals, and money to send back to her mother to support me.  I had no idea.

By Boston Public Library [Public domain],
via Wikimedia Commons

I went on to find out that the S. S. Milwaukee Clipper is still in existence. The ‘Clipper is a National Historic Landmark and dockside in Muskegon, Michigan. Their website explains a lot about the ship and its history. Built in 1904 as the Junita she was sold and completely overhauled in 1940, where a new steel superstructure was installed, she was fireproofed, had AC installed to the staterooms, and other comforts were added. I am sure that the crew quarters were tight.

Anyway, it was a fascinating side trip into a bit of my mother’s history that I had no idea about.