Ancestor Sketch – Erdman Max Hopfe

52 Ancestors – Week 2018-28
Hopfe-Bauer Project
By Don Taylor

Hopfe-Bauer 2018 – Ancestor #04

List of Grandparents

  • Grandfather: Erdman Max Hopfe
  • 1st Great-grandfather: Franz Hopfe

Erdman Max Hopfe (1887-1926)

Immigrant Ancestor

Max[i] Hopfe was born in Rudolstade, Germany to Franz and Hedwig (Hohl) Hopfe on 26 April 1887. Rudolstadt is a town in the German district (Kreis) of Saalfeld-Rudolstadt in the state of Thuringia, Germany. Today, Rudolstade has a population of about 22,000.

Childhood

Nothing is known of Max’s childhood. He has a younger brother, whose name was either Casper or Oscar (or maybe he had two brothers), but nothing is known about any other siblings. When Max was 19 years-old, he emigrated to the United States arriving in New York in 1906.

Max established himself in New York working as a butcher and in 1912 he was living at 227 89th in Brooklyn. The building he lived in at that time is long gone. A new building replaced his building in 1960.[ii]

Marriage

On 18 May 1911, Max and Henriette Wilhiminea Futterer acquired a marriage license and married the same day. (License Number 13285 & Marriage Certificate Number 11538)

Children of Max & Henriette Hopfe

Walter Carl b. 1914
Marion / Marie b. 1922

Adulthood

In 1915, New York held a state census. Max, Henrietta and their first child, Walter, were living at 314 Central Ave. Living with them was Max’s brother, Oscar. Again, the building they lived in no longer exists and was replaced sometime in the 1960s.

Tenements at Park Avenue and 107th Street, New York City, circa 1900
Tenements at Park Avenue and 107th Street, New York City, circa 1900 (Via Wikipedia)

In 1917, Max registered for the draft. His draft registration is one of the few documents which provides his first name. His physical description is provided as tall, slender, with blue eyes and black hair. Max is working as a grocer and still lives on Central Ave.

By 1920, Max and Henrietta moved to 79 Ave A. It appears that Ave A was renamed to Albemarle and is now the location of Public School 230 – Doris L Cohan Elementary.

Travel

In April 1923, Max received a passport and in May 1923 went to Europe to “visit relatives in Germany and Switzerland.” He initially indicated he would be in Europe for six months, but it doesn’t appear that he returned until August 1924.

Ort & Company, Inc

In November 1924, Max established Ort & Company, Inc., a provision business with partners, Ernest Wolff and Christian Mack. The business was at 217 Wyckoff Ave. It was an excellent corner location. The building that Ort & Company were in is gone; today the Ridgewood Bushwick Senior Citizens Council occupies that location in a building that was built in 1931.

Death & Beyond

Max Hopfe died on 2 October 1926. He was buried at the Lutheran Cemetery, in lot 20217 (Map 4) today the cemetery is known as the Lutheran All Faiths Cemetery and is located in Middle Village, Queens County, New York.

Max’s wife Henriette was named the executrix to Max’s estate. His estate was appraised for $31,611 (Gross) and $28,255 (Net), which included $14,000 as a 1/3 interest in the business property at 217 Wyckoff Ave. (Ort & Company, Inc.).

Future Actions:

  • Contact Lutheran All Faiths Cemetery and get internment location information.
  • Visit a Family History Center and get a copy of the Death Certificate for Max Hopfe, Certificate Number 19938. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-C95V-HVD8
  • Search further for records of the Hopfe family in Thuringia, Germany. See: How to Find Birth, Marriage, and Death Records for Thuringia, Germany.

Sources

  1. New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924, Family Search, S.S. Hansa – 1 Sep 1924 – Max Hopfe. Accessed 10 November 2016. https://familysearch.org/ark:/ 61903/1:1:JNCW-74M.
  2. United States World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918, Family Search, Erdman Max Hopfe . Accessed: 13 November 2016. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KXY2-G1Q.
  3. 1920 Census, Family Search, Max Hopfed (Hopfe) – Manhattan, New York, New York. Accessed: 13 November 2016. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MJYR-FXW.
  4. New York, New York City Municipal Deaths, 1795-1949, Family Search, Max Hopfe -. Accessed: 13 November 2016 . https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:2W5B-LXR.
  5. 1915 New York State Census, Ancestry.Com, Max Hope – ED 18, Brooklyn, Kings, New York.
  6. U.S. City Directories, 1922-1995, New York City – 1912 – Page 719 – Hopfe. Via Ancestry.Com. https://search.ancestry.com/collections/2469/records/1213920519/.
  7. United States Passport Applications, 1795-1925, Family Search, Max Hopfe – 268521. Accessed: 13 November 2016 . https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QV5Y-89J5.
  8. 1925-11-21, Page 19 – Column 1, New Corporations. Via Newspapers.com., Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Brooklyn, New York (Newspapers.com).
  9. 1927-10-11, Page 24 – Appraisals – Hopfe, Max. Via Newspapers.Com. http://Newspapers.com., Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Brooklyn, New York (Newspapers.com).
  10. 1New York, New York City Marriage Records, 1829-1940, Family Search, Max Hopfe – Hennriette Futterer. Accessed 13 November 2016 . https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:2438-7FL.
  11. New York, New York, Extracted Marriage Index, 1866-1937, Ancestry.Com, Max Hopfe & Henriette Futterer – 18 May 1911 – No Image. Ancestry.com. https://search.ancestry.com/ collections/9105/records/2152469/.
  12. United States Passport Applications, 1795-1925, Family Search, Max Hopfe – 268521. Accessed: 13 November 2016 . https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QV5Y-89J5.
  13. New York, New York, Marriage License Indexes, 1907-1995, Ancestry.Com, Marriage License – Max Hopfe & Henriette Futtnerer. New York City Municipal Archives; New York, New York; License Number: 13285. https://search.ancestry.com/collections/61406/records/8874500/.

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Endnotes

[i] Only a couple records ever mention his first name of Erdman. Most records only indicate him by Max, which is the name he was known by. I have never found a record which suggests Max is short for Maxwell, Maxamilion or any other “Max” name. I use Max Hopfe throughout this sketch.

[ii] Internet: Zillow – https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/227-E-89th-St-Brooklyn-NY-11236/30766300_zpid/

The 1820 Census and Robert Maben

Brown/Sanford/Parsons/Maben
Census Sunday
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.Following families through the pre-1850 Census is always a challenge. I was researching my 4th great-grandmother, Deborah Buel Maben. She married in 1824 and I’ve been able to follow her through her husband in the census records during her married life. I began working to find evidence of her in the 1820 Census. I knew she was married in Greene County, New York and I quickly found what appeared to be her father, Robert Maben (Mabin in the census Record).

Next, I mapped the family out with what I believed I knew about the family. Do the children I know about fit the Census record?

1820 Census – Robert Mabin [Maben]

Robert Mabin   2 1 1 1 1 – 2 2 – 1 –

<  10               = 2      Presumed to be Addison T,. Age 3
Presumed to be John, Age 9
10-16             = 1      Unknown Child –
16-18             = 1      Presumed to be James, Age 17
16-26             = 1      Duplicate of above person (James)
26-45             = 1      Presumed to be Robert Maben, Age 39
Over 45 –

<  10               = 2      Presumed to include Mary E. Maben, Age 5
Presumed to include Electa Maben, Age 2 months.
10-16             = 2      Presumed to Include Deborah Buel Maben, Age 15
Presumed to Include Sarah, Age 13
16-26 –
26-45             = 1      Presumed to be Electa, Age 38
Over 45 –

In this case, every child I know about appears to be enumerated along with Robert Maben and his wife, Electa, fit the age ranges given in the census. Now, I’m confident that the Maben family was in Lexington, Green County, New York in 1820.

And what so often happens with records, there are new questions. Who is the unknown male child from 10 to 16 years of age? I know of no child in the Maben family who fits that criteria. Could this be a cousin, an adoptee, or a child of Robert and Electa? I don’t know yet, but it will definitely cause me to keep an eye out for other records that suggest another child.

A child between 10 and 16 in 1820 had to have been born between 1803 and 1810.

  • James was born in 1803
  • Deborah in 1805
  • Sarah in 1807 and
  • John in 1811.

The only gap in that series is 1809. So, I suspect this unknown boy living in the household of Robert Maben is a heretofore unknown son. I’ve added him to my tree as a hypothesis with the above information. It is certainly possible that this person is possibly some other and I will keep that possibility in mind.

So many possibilities exist. Another one revolves around Robert & Electa’s eighth known child, Charles B. Maben.  It is possible I have his birthdate wrong and he was really born much earlier than the 1824 date, I have for his birth.

On to the 1810 Census….

 

Donna Darling Collection – Part 29

Globe Theatre
Treasure Chest Thursday
By Don Taylor

Donna Montran – Ill and Injured

The Donna Darling Collection has a page that included four little clippings. None of the four were dated. Elsewhere on that scrapbook page are articles regarding Donna’s playing at the Cosmos Theater in Washington DC in March. (More about that in another post.)

ILL AND INJURED [Transcript]

“Ill and Injured” – Donna Darling Collection

“Dave Kramer (Kramer and Boyle dislocated his knee in stepping out of an automobile. The team were forced to cancel the last half of last week as a result. (April 21)”

“Bill Vidocq. Keith agent, has returned from Lakewood and is back on the fifth floor of the Keith Exchange.

“Illness beset the Donna Montra [sic] and Bathing Girls Revue last week twofold when Juva Marconi dislocated her hip while dancing, causing her confinement in the Lankanau Hospital, Philadelphia. Later in the week Miss Montran, the prima donna of the company, underwent a nose and throat operation in New York.

[Globe Theatre, Philadelphia, May 16]

Illness Strikes Donna

“Donna Montran, who with her Bathing Beauties was forced to cancel some time through the necessity of an operation recently, has fully recovered and opens at the Globe theatre, Philadelphia, for a return engagement, May 16.”

[Ann Troy]

Ann Troy joins

“Ann Troy, dancer, has replaced Juva Marconi in the Donna Montran and her Bathing Beauties act.”

[Donna Takes Summer Off]

Bathing Beauties closes for summer

“Donna Montran closed her Bathing Beauties act last week and will rest up for the summer. She will appear in production next season.”

Analysis

  1. In April 1920, Donna was still performing with “Chin-Chin” in Maryland.
  2. In March 1921, Donna was performing “Donna Montran and her California Bathing Beauties.”
  3. By April 1922, Donna had changed her stage name to “Donna Darling.”

So, we know that “ILL AND INJURED” must be referring to 1921.

  Birth, Marriage & Death CollectionApril 21 was the last half of the week of April 17 to 23. That means that Juva Marconi must have dislocated her hip sometime around April 17 to 19 and that Donna must have gone to New York for her surgery about 20th or 21st.

In Clipping 2, we learn the Donna and her Bathing Beauties opened at the Globe Theatre, Philadelphia on May 16.

In Clipping 3, we learn that Ann Troy replaced Juva Marconi in the show.

In Clipping 4, we learn that the show closed for the summer. It is unclear when that occurred.

What I learned:

  • Donna and her Bathing Beauties, including Juva Marconi, must have been playing in Philadelphia or somewhere near Philadelphia the week of 17 April 1921. Possibly the Globe Theatre.
  • Donna went to New York for nose and throat surgery about 20 April 1920.
  • Donna and her Bathing Beauties “returned” to the Globe theatre on May 16.
  • Donna and her Bathing Beauties closed sometime after May 16 for the summer.

Consequent to the above, I have updated the Donna Montran Timeline to include the following:

  • April 17, 1921 – Unknown Theater near Philadelphia (Possibly the Globe Theatre).
  • May 16, 1921 – Globe Theatre, Philadelphia, PA – Donna Montran and her Bathing Beauties.
  • Date unknown [May, June, or July 1921] – Donna Closed the Show for the Summer.

Bio – Franklin C. Darling

Darling Line
By Don Taylor

I was recently talking with a Civil War researcher and mentioned that Minnesota’s Civil War experience was quite a bit different than most of the rest of the country. Because of the War, many of the supplies promised to Native Americans by treaty were redirected to support the war effort, leaving the Native Americans to starve. Because of that, many Native Americans attacked the settlers in Minnesota in search of food, blankets, and other necessities. An uprising of the Santee Sioux in August 1862 caused the deaths of 490 settlers, including women and children. In retaliation, the United States hung thirty-eight Dakota Indians in Mankato, Minnesota, in the largest mass hanging in American History. After the hanging Continue reading “Bio – Franklin C. Darling”

Ancestor Bio – Chester Parsons (1799-1887)

52 Ancestors – Week 2018-16
Brown/Sanford/Parsons

By Don Taylor

I never imagined I’d have an ancestor that there is just too much information available. Amazingly, I have more information about Chester Parsons and his life than I can keep up with. Ancestry, suggests there are 85 Ancestry Hints and 13 other public Ancestry Member Trees relating to Chester Parsons. Admittedly, five of those Ancestry Hints are from me because of one of those old trees, but still 80 Hints is more than I recall seeing elsewhere. I went through all of them, several weren’t clearly my Chester Parsons (1799-1887) and appeared to have been other Chesters. But still, there were a couple items I hadn’t seen before including a photo of Chester. I have several sources of information that I didn’t add to my tree because they didn’t add any new detail, instead confirmed information that I already had. But still, I ended up using 21 sources for information about Chester’s life.

Brown-Roberts Research 2017 – Ancestor #102

List of Grandparents

Chester Parsons (1799-1887)

Chester Parsons was born on 1 December 1799, the fifth child of John Parsons, Jr. and Mary Wolcott, in Sandisfield, Berkshire County, Massachusetts.

Chester’s siblings included:

  • Samuel –  Born 5 Apr 1787
  • Polly – Born 17 Jan 1792
  • Orrin – Born 6 Mar 1794
  • John – Born 5 May 1796

Childhood

Sometime shortly after his birth and before 1802, the family moved from Massachusetts to Windham, Greene County, New York. In April 1813, Chester’s father, John, died. It appears that older brothers Samuel and Orrin established their own households by the 1820 Census. I have not been successful determining where Chester, his sister Polly, his brother John or his mother, Mary, were during the 1820 Census. I suspect they were living with another family member whose surname was not Parsons.

Marriage

Chester married Deborah Buel Maben on 26 November 1824 in Greene County, New York.

They had eight children

  • Lucinda           Born 1825 in New York
  • James               Born 1826 in Michigan
  • Mary Electa   Born 1828 in Michigan
  • Alfred David  Born 1830 in Michigan
  • Harriet Eliza Born 1832 in Michigan
  • E. W.                 Born 1833 in Michigan
  • Sarah Jane     Born 1833 in Michigan
  • Melissa           Born 1843 in Michigan

Adulthood

In May 1826, Chester and his brother, Orrin headed west to Michigan Territory. The two of them purchased 160 acres of land in Saline Township on 1 November 1826. They built the first mill in the area as well as the first frame house.

The 1830 Census found Chester as the head of the household consisting of two males and three females. On 1 August 1831, Chester purchased 78.24 acres of land, and in 1837 he bought another 80 acres.

The 1840 Census found Chester’s household consisting of four males and six females. There is one male, age 50 to 60 and one female age 20 to 30 that are unknown and do not appear to be Chester’s children.

The 1850 Census finds the Chester Parsons household consisting of Chester, his wife, five of his daughters, one son, and four unrelated farm hands, although Zebe Fuller would marry his daughter Harriet.  Chester’s real property was valued at $7,800.

The 1860 Census finds a prosperous Chester Parsons living with his wife and two daughters. Also living in the household are two young females, ages 19 and 22 who are domestics as well as three farm laborers. Chester’s real property was valued at $12,500.

The 1870 Census finds Chester and his wife, Deborah, living alone. His real estate is valued at $21,000 and his personal property at $5,000.

Deborah died in 1874 at the age of 69. They had been married for nearly 50 years.

C. Parsons Home

Chester remarried on 11 November 1875 to the Widow Wakefield. Chester’s second wife, Jennette Arnold Wakefield, was 24 years younger than Chester.

The 1880 Census finds Chester and Jennett living together in Saline, Chester was 80 and Jennett was 56 and keeping house.

Chester died on 7 June 1887. He was buried at Benton Cemetery, in Plot 30 next to his first wife.

Chester’s property went through probate. Many of his children and grandchildren were mentioned in the various probate documents. There were auctions of his property as well. At one auction, on November 28th, 1890, 52 acres wheat on the ground sold for $6.95 per acre. Also, and a large number of farm implements. Sixty acres of timberland was sold to Sturm and Reeves. Also sold at the auction were 12 cows, 16 head young cattle, and seven horses,

Because Chester was an early pioneer in Saline Township he is often mentioned in various historical books, such as The History of Washtenaw County, and newspaper articles long after his death. According to them Orrin and Chester built the first sawmill in town in 1827, two miles south of the village. There is another story where Chester and Orrin were concerned that someone else might purchase the land they wanted, so they walked by an old Indian trail through the night to Monroe to acquire the property. Chester became the postmaster for Benton in 1835 and cut a road from Saline to Tecumseh road. He kept a hotel before the railroad was completed to Ann Arbor.

Page 437 of The History of Washtenaw County provides a portrait of Chester Parsons. (See above.)

Marker – Chester Parsons – Courtesy Find a Grave

Likewise, page 105 of York, Saline, Ypsilanti, Lyndon, Sharon (Mich.) Township residences, ca. 1874, provides an image of Chester Parsons’ house in Saline. (See above.)

I’ve found a photo of Chester, a birth record, a death record, two marriage records, presumably him in the 1800 Census and through all the Census records in his adult life, 1830 through 1880. I’ve found photos of his home, Bureau of Land Management records of his land purchases, his probate records, and maps showing his property during various years. Finally, stories about his life and activities abound.  His was a life well lived and I am proud to be descended from him.

Further Actions / Follow-up

  • The History of Washtenaw County, page 1406, indicates that Chester’s wife Deborah wrote a history of their move from New York to Michigan what recounted the “hardships and privations of their early pioneer life.” Apparently, she did not complete it, but I would love to find a copy of whatever might have survived from that writing.

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Sources

I have so many sources for Chester Parsons, I’ve decided to abbreviate the sources so that the sources aren’t longer than the article. Additional detail is available; however, the information provided should be sufficient to find the record.

  • 1800 Census – John Parsons Jr. – Sandisfield, Berkshire, Massachusetts (3rd from bottom).
  • 1830 Census – Chester Parsons – Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan Territory/
  • 1840 Census – Chester Parsons – Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan
  • 1850 Census – Chester Parsons – Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan
  • 1860 Census – Chester Parsons – Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan
  • 1870 Census – Chester Parson – Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan
  • 1880 Census – Chester Parsons – Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan
  • Daughters of the American Revolution, “Ancestor Search,” DAR, Buell, Grover – Patriot: A016639 – Member: Ruth Evelyn Hill Carr
  • Daughters of the American Revolution, “Ancestor Search,” DAR, Maben, John – Patriot: A072838 – Member: Ruth Evelyn Hill Carr
  • Chas. C. Chapman & Co. (2012). History of Washtenaw County, Michigan: Together with sketches of its cities, villages and townships, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history; portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens: history of Michigan: embracing accounts of the pre-historic races, aborigines, French, English and American conquests, and a general review of its civil, political and military history – Pages 1370, 1371, 1373, & 1405.
  • Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620 – Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011 – Parsons.
  • Michigan, Death Records, 1867-1950 Ancestry.com – Chester Parsons – Died: 7 Jun 1887.
  • Michigan, Marriage Records, 1867-1952, Ancestry.Com. – Chester Parsons – Jennett Wakefield.
  • The Saline Observer (Saline, MI)– Various repositories:
    • 1882-08-17, Page 3, Column 2, Para 16
    • 1890-11-20, Page 7 – Auctions – Chester Parsons
    • 1890-12-04, Page 5, Column 2, Paragraph 6 – Chester Parsons
    • 1890-12-18, Page 7, Column 3, Paragraph 19 – Chester Parsons
    • 1897-06-24, Page 5, Column 2, bottom –  Obit – Janette A Arnold [Parsons]

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