My Wife’s DNA Results

I was bad. I mean, I was very bad. I got my wife an Ancestry autosomal DNA test for her birthday. Sure, she received some other gifts from me, but she thinks the autosomal DNA test was more for me than for her. She’s probably right – actually, she’s always right. I like figuring out relationships of DNA matches. For me it is great sport and she knows me well. So, I guess it really was my gift to me on the occasion of the celebration of her birth.  


After the test was done and the results were received, I started looking at her results. Ireland, Scandinavia, Great Britain – no surprises there. Iberian Peninsula is a bit odd, but not unbelievable. Then it hit me – No Swiss!? That is very odd. Two of her great grandparents emigrated from Switzerland. Her great-grandfather, John Huber, came from Windlach, Zürich, Switzerland. Family oral history says that his family farmed the same land for 800 years. Her great-grandmother, Bertha Trümpi, came from Ennenda, Glarus, Switzerland. With both great-grandparents coming from Switzerland, I would have expected her grandmother to have been 100% Swiss. With her grandmother being 100%, I expected my wife to be about 25% Swiss. However, there was no reference to that ancestry in Ancestor.Com’s ethnicity profile for her. That is really odd. Now, the “trace regions” make up 10% of her DNA, but diving into that showed that she about 9% Italian, Greek, and “Europe West.” Anyway, 9% is a far cry away from the 25% that I expected. I’ll have to see if I can get her mother to test as well and see what comes through from those results.

About 9% from areas that include Switzerland

Although the Ethnicity Estimates are fun, the real reason for DNA testing is to make connections with others researching the same family trees and to facilitate communications between cousins researching the same family. For that, I was disappointed that Ancestry allows you to connect your DNA profile only to one tree. Long ago, I separated my wife’s family trees into two different trees – one for her paternal line and one for her maternal line. The biggest reason I did that was that other people, who are researching one line, are never researching the other line. I’ve also found that few people really care about the genealogy of individuals related only by the marriage of a distant cousin. Anyway, I think Ancestry should allow you to link an individual’s DNA to any tree that they are a part of.

Anyway, because Ancestry.com doesn’t allow for multiple trees to be linked to an individual DNA profile, I needed to create a new tree just for her autosomal DNA results. So, I exported her two trees, then merged them into one, uploaded that as a new tree, and then linked her DNA to that tree. Sigh… Not a huge task, but now I have an instance of her tree that I probably will not manage.

I looked closer at the DNA Matches. Wow, 180 matches at 4th cousin or closer. That’s amazing. One of the matches shared a common ancestor hint. A new 4th cousin’s relationship appeared. Ancestry showed my wife’s tree going up to the common ancestor and back down to the cousin.

Then I looked at the cousin’s tree closer. She had parents for that common ancestor, names that I didn’t have. So, I now have two new ancestors named. The great thing is that individual also had sources for those ancestors. I can then take what she has and determine if I can follow her analysis and see if I agree. So, it is a great beginning to another research project.

Matching tree from Ancestry.com 
(first two generations not displayed) 

The other matches (3rd cousin or closer) either have private trees or do not have meaningful trees on Ancestry  matched to their DNA. I will need to contact each individual and see if they have a tree elsewhere they will share with me. In any event, there are many new leads to follow because of the autosomal DNA testing of my wife.

Actions to take:

Have my wife’s mother tested though Ancestry.
Follow-up research with Catherine A.D. Walter (wife’s shared common ancestor).
Contact each of the 5 people identified as 3rd cousins and
   see if we can determine the relationship and
   identify and research any new ancestor leads.  

————-  DISCLAIMER  ————-

Start Looking

Florence Wilma Huber Darling (1908-1934)

52 Ancestors #16 – [Florence Wilma Huber Darling (1908-1934)

Bio – Florence Wilma Huber Darling

Florence Huber
Approx. 1924 (Age 16)
Florence was born on 23 April, 1908 in Wisconsin, the first
child of Johan (John) and Bertha Trümpi Huber.[i] At
the time her parents probably lived near Primrose, Dane County, Wisconsin and
were part of the Swiss immigrant population in that area. [ii]
Shortly after her birth the Hubers moved to Elberta and
Josephine, Baldwin, Alabama where her brother Clarence was born a year and a
half later.[iii]  This
is a very unusual migration route and it prompted me to look further at
possible reasons for the relocation there. 
It appears that the Hubers had succumbed to advertising that was
targeted to the Swiss Colony folks in Wisconsin and Minnesota which provided
inexpensive trips to southern Alabama in February and March to promote land
sales.
By the time Florence was 12 the family had relocated back north, this time to Saginaw, Michigan. [iv] In the school year 1920-1921 she, and her brother Clarence, had perfect attendance, missing no days of school.[v]            
It is unclear how or where Florence met the divorcee, Robert
Harry Darling. Harry had been married in 1925 to Nora Glies and divorced in
1926.  He married Florence in 1929 and
located to  110 N. Fremont. Ross, Allegheny
County, Pennsylvania by the 1930 census time. 
It appears that the apartment that was at that location was replaced in
1950. Later in 1930, Florence had a daughter.
425 Charles St., Pittsburgh, PA
Today
Thanks to Google Maps
Florence died on 5 October 1934 of Bilateral Pyosalpinx,
Pelvic Cellulitis, cause undetermined. She lived at 423 Charles, Pittsburgh, PA
at the time of her death.[vi]
According to her death certificate she was buried at Zion
Memorial Cemetery. A Find-a-Grave photo request has gone unanswered since May
2013.

Further Research

Determine date for her marriage to Robert Harry Darling.
Get photo of her grave marker.

 Sources:

[i] Pennsylvania Death
Certificate, Certificate #89399. Florence Darling (Robt H. Darling – Informant).
[ii] 1905 Wisconsin
State Census, Ancestry.com, http://www.Ancestry.com, Huber, John. http://search.ancestry.com/cgi­bin/sse.dll?
h=1552251&db=WIstatecen&indiv=try.
[iii] Lutheran
(Alabama), Baptism Certificate, Ancestry Family Trees
[iv] 1920 Census, Ancestry.com, http://www.Ancestry.com,
James, Saginaw, Michigan – John Huber.
[v] Saginaw New
Courier, Genealogy Bank, 1921-07-21 – Page 11 – Nine Hundred Children in Rural
Schools Not Absent Nor Tardy in Past School Year. http://phw01.newsbank.com/cache/arhb/fullsize/pl_004152014_1553_00585_70.pdf.
[vi] Pennsylvania Death
Certificate, Certificate #89399. Florence Darling (Robt H. Darling –
Informant).

Gebert Huber and Anna Altman.

As I mentioned before, I was excited to find the Huber/Trumpi Marriage Record in the Wisconsin Marriages 1836-1930.  It gave me John Huber’s birthplace, parents names, and Bertha Trumpi’s parents names.  I decided to order the film of the record via the Family Search and have it delivered to my closest Family History Center. I was very pleased that it was only $7.50 (instead of Wisconsin’s $20) and that I would have the opportunity to get a couple more records of potential relatives off that spool.

The spool came in last Wednesday and I was able to get to the center last Saturday.  I loaded up the film and away I went.  Rolled to the right record (thanks to the reference number in the Index) and there they were.  I had to fire up the machine next to it, start up the capture software, and then capture the image.  A bit cumbersome the first time, but after I got the hang of it it went well.  Great scans of the image at 400 Pixels per inch.  Nice.  Save the files to a thumb drive. I then saved the images of the other folks I might be interested in and was done in just a few minutes

The most interesting new bit of information from the image was the “Names of subscribing witnesses.”

Gebert Huber andAnna Altman with
John and Bertha Trumpi Huber (bride & groom)
2 Mar 1905 – New Glarus, Green County, Wisconsin

Gebert Huber  and Anna Altman.  It was particularly cool because I have a photo of John and Bertha with two other individuals, presumably the best man and bride’s maid – aka the witnesses.  So a new bit of information and new questions.

There are at least two Anna Altmans in the New Glarus/GreenCounty area that could be the Anna in the photo. Looking at the families there, I’m not seeing anything that links them together.  The Altmans came to New Glarus many years earlier.  However, maybe they, or someone close to them were the “aunt and uncle” that brought Bertha to the States. Lots more to dig into.

Gebert Huber — same last name as my Johann/John Huber.  Coincidence or family.  It is often that the brother of the groom.  Could this be a brother?  Maybe I can find where Gebert came to the states.  Maybe he came for the wedding.  Again, so much more to dig into.  The research never ends.

I’ll probably look into Rev. A. Roth and see exactly who he was.  He performed an “ecclesiastical” ceremony.

I am incredibly pleased that Family Search has their Family Heritage Centers around the country and provides the service of providing images for research.  I had never used the service before and am extremely glad that I did.  It worked well for me.  I highly recommend using it if you can.