Deserter, Traitor, Malingerer?

Deserter, Traitor, Malingerer? You Decide.

Sometimes there is a reason why a family doesn’t speak much about an ancestor.  A very good friend of mine had virtually no oral history regarding an ancestor, a second great grandfather. He and his family have been in Georgia for many generations and he was sure that if his second great-grandfather was able bodied he must have fought in the “War of Northern Aggression” (the Civil War to us Yankees.) I told him I’d take a look and see what I could figure out. 

Bio – Hiram Frank Glazier (1838-1916)

Meriwether County, Georgia
(Courtesy Wikipedia)
Hiram was born on May 25th, 1838, the fourth of six children, in Meriwether County, Georgia. His parents were Franklin H. and Ruth Glazier. He had one older brother, John, and two older sisters, Mary and an unknown sister. By 1850, when Hiram was only 12, his father was gone either through death or abandonment. He was loving with his mother, one sister and three brothers.
Probably in 1857, when he was about 19 years old, he appears to have begun heading west. In Mississippi, he married Jane Donnald on 12 November.  In January, 1860 their first child, Thomas, was born in Texas.  In July, 1860, the Census finds the three of them living near Quitman, in Wood County, Texas. Living with them in 1860 was Thomas Darnell; Thomas was 19 years old and also came from Georgia. Of course there is a wonder if their child was named after Thomas Darnell.

The Civil War

in 1861, Texas seceded from the union, joined the Confederacy, in March, and Hiram had his second child, Joseph. The Civil War broke out on the 12th of April, 1861.  In a pension application, Hiram claimed to have enlisted in Co. C., 1st Texas Reg. Partisan Rangers Cav. However, there was no record of him in the Regiment rolls at the time of his pension application. Sadly, the Units of the Confederate States Army by Joseph H. Crute, Jr. contains no history for this unit.  Not much seems to be recorded about this unit. 
Record of Oath of Allegiance
(Courtesy Fold 3)
According to union records, Hiram deserted on 11 July, 1864, entering the Union lines. Again, according to union records, on the 18th of July, 1864, Hiram took and oath of allegiance to the Union. This activity is not mentioned in his pension application. As a matter of fact, he states that he was never captured during the war. According to Hiram, in March of 1865 he was given furlough for 30 days due to a “disabled right hand.”  At the end of the 30 days he didn’t return to duty because the hand was not healed. He considered himself still on furlough at that time. Later, in May of 1865, his unit finally surrendered; Hiram still hadn’t rejoined his regiment because his hand was still disabled.

Post War

In 1866, Hiram’s third child, Charles was born and in 1868 Hiram returns to Georgia. 
In 1869, Hiram married Martha B. Fuller.  I am not sure what happened to Jane Donnald. 
In 1870, Hiram is living with his with Martha, who is 8 years his junior. Thomas and Joseph are living with them as is a still, apparently unnamed child, “Babe” who is two month old in July. Not sure what happened to the “Babe” but the child doesn’t show up in the 1880 Census.
By 1878, Hiram had moved over to Pike County, (the next county east) near Hollonville. His is paying taxes there and renting land. The 1880 census indicates him living with his wife Martha and six sons living with them. Thomas, Joseph, Charles, John, Whitfield, and Howard. 
Martha died between 1886 and 1900, leaving Hiram a widower living with six sons , John, Whitfield, Howard, Lyman, Benjamin, and Hiram, and a daughter, Lizzie.  His oldest son. Thomas, is living next door with his wife and five children.
On 7 May 1901, Hiram married his third wife. Dora Frances Argroves. Dora was much younger than him, 22 years younger. 

In 1904, his son Benjamin died and in 1910 his son, Layman, died also. 
The 1910 census shows neither Hiram nor Dora working, however, Hiram’s son, John, lives with them and is working as a merchant in a general store.
Hiram Glazier’s Marker
(Thanks to Find-a-Grave)
Sometime between 1910 and 1915 Hiram moved to Coweta County which is immediately north of Meriwether county. 
in 1915, Hiram applied for Soldier’s Pension under the act of 1910.  In the application he indicates that he had sold his mule and only had household goods valued at about $300.  He was disapproved for the pension because giving his oath to the Union back on July 18th, 1864 disqualified him from a pension.
Hiram died on June 9th, 1916, in Coweta County. He is buried at at Williamson UMC Cemetery, Williamson, Pike County, Georgia, USA.  He was survived by his wife Dora, and sons, Thomas, Joseph, John, Whitfield, Howard, Hiram/Hebe, and a daughter Lizzie (Ruth) Glazier Camp.

Afterlog  

In 1937, Hiram’s widow Dora applied for a widow’s pension. Her application was likewise disapproved because “Hiram F. Glazier enlisted as private in Co. C, 1st Regt, Texas Calvary July 1862. Deserted to enemy in Louisiana July 11, 1864. Took oath of allegiance to the U. S. Govt., New Orleans, LA, July 18, 1864.”
My working theory is that Hiram did participate with the 1st Regt, Texas Calvary from his enlistment in July 1862 until July 1864.  I would like to think that he became separated from his unit and ended up walking into the union lines where he surrendered.  Both sides had horrific prisoner of war camps.  When given a choice of going to a prisoner of war camp or taking an Oath of Allegiance to the Union Government and promising to never take up arms against them, he picked the latter.  
I suspect he went against his oath to the Union and rejoined his confederate unit.  Had he been caught at that point it would have been treason to the Union and certain execution.  As such, when his hand was “disabled” he did whatever he could to stay away from his unit and a 30 day furlough was a great start.  He had little reason to return to duty with a trigger pulling hand “disabled” so he stayed away a little too long. 
Sources:
Ancestry.Com – 1850 Census
Ancestry.Com – 1860 Census
Ancestry.Com – 1870 Census
Ancestry.Com – 1880 Census
Ancestry.Com – 1900 Census
Ancestry.Com – 1810 Census
ancestry.Com – Georgia, Confederate Pension Applications, 1879-1960 
Ancestry.com –  Georgia Marriages, 1851-1900 
ancestry.com – Georgia, Property Tax Digests, 1793-1892
Family Search – Hunting for Bears – Mississippi Marriages, 1776-1935
Find A Grave – Memorial 25638222 – Hiram Frank Glazier
Fold 3 – Hiram F. Glazier – Civil War Records

McAllister Murder – January 29, 1925 – Bell’s Preliminary Hearing Tomorrow

Savannah Press
27 January 1925

 FIND NEGRO BOY CHOPPED IN HEAD NEAR M’ALLISTERS

DISCOVERED NEAR THE CANAL; CITY POLICE INVESTIGATING

ONE SUSPECT IS HELD AT BARRACKS

An unidentified negro boy with wounds in, his head similar to those that killed Edward L. Mc Allister, was found on the canal bank this morning within a stone’s throw of the McAllister home.
Found at Canal.
The boy, who is about twelve years old, was discovered at the canal near Cedar street and Seiler avenue by J. D. Stafford, of 1312 Seiler avenue.  He reported his discovery to the police. The negro had evidently been thrown in the canal by his assailant as dead. When discovered, his hands were clenched so tightly together as to be almost white. He was carried to the Georgia Infirmary. 
Investigating
Savannah Press
27 January 1925
The negro was found just within the city limits and city police will investigate. Lieut. Hallford of the police, reports that the negro who up to this time is not identified beyond the name “Joe,” was chopped in the head with a hatchet.
County policemen who saw the wounds in the boy’s, head believe he was struck with a blunt instrument, not a hatchet. This view is said to be held by the physician who operated on the youth.
One Arrested.
The victim of the assault mumbled the name of someone supposed to have been his assailant. The city police have one suspect in custody. He is a negro. They, are looking for another negro.
The theory of the police is that the negro was thrown into the canal and that he crawled out on the bank, where he was found and the case reported. 
McAllister’s Death,
McAllister was discovered dead In, his house a fortnight ago, terrible hatchet wounds having been inflicted in his head. William R. Bell was arrested and charged with the murder. He is now In jail awaiting a preliminary hearing. This will be held tomorrow morning.
The spot where the negro was found is within a very short distance of the McAllister home.


Sources: 
Savannah Press (Savannah, GA) January 27, 1925 – Page 14 – microfilm via University of Georgia Libraries.

McAllister Murder – Murder Suspect and Wife – Jan 20th

Murder Suspect, and Wife, Who Prepares to Fight His Cause

Darling-McAllister

Wm. R. Bell & Mrs. Lillian Bell- Savannah Press – 20 Jan 1925  – Page 16

Mr. Bell is held incommunicado in Chatham jail on a charge of slaying Edward L. McAllister, who was found dead a week ago. His wife stoutly maintains his innocence and is preparing to go to work to earn money that he may be given every advantage in his defense. Mr. Bell was in the army during the war. He served for a time at Camp Wheeler, Macon.

BELL’S WIFE TRACES HIS MOVEMENTS ON NIGHT OF MURDER
– – – – – – – – – – – – – –
SAYS DOESN’T SEE HOW THEY SAY HER HUSBAND SLEW M’ALLISTER
– – – – – – – – – – – – – –
W. R. BELL ARRESTED LATE ON YESTERDAY

Mrs. Lillian Bell, wife of William Robert Bell, who was jailed late yesterday on the charge of murdering Edward L. McAllister, does not know “how they can say Mr. Bell killed ‘Mac.'” and traces the movements of her husband on Monday night, the time the police believe Mr. McAllister was killed with a hatchet in his home on Thirty-ninth street, near Ash.

Talked Freely.

A Press representative called on Mrs. Bell this morning and, although busily engaged in cooking breakfast when the newspaper man arrived. Mrs. Bell, rather frail but very attractive little woman with bronze hair and brown eyes, talked about the case very freely.
“I don’t know how they can say Mr. Bell killed ‘Mac.’ I know they say he was late going to work that Monday night, but I can show you the bottle of medicine he got for the baby. She was well all afternoon, but about 8 o’clock she became ill and Mr. Bell said he did not intend to go to work. I told him I thought he could go to work, but he is simply foolish about Dolores and said he did not intend to leave her ill. He finally made up his mind to go down to yard on Liberty street and ask Mr. Ferguson to tell his leader, Mr. Champion, that his baby was ill and he would not be at work.”

Went to Drug Store

Continuing her story of her husband’s movements on the Monday night in question, Mrs. Bell said: “When Mr. Bell came back from the yard, he went to Norwood’s drug store to get some medicine but it was closed. He then went to the other drug store down on East Broad, but It was also closed. Mr. Bell then came back, put up his, car and went to work.”
When asked if her husband and McAllister had been on good terms lately, Mrs. Bell hesitated a little before replying, but finally said: Well, yes, I think so. I know Mr. Bell told me he and “Mac” walked out together on Saturday the latter part of December when they were paid off. Asked if they came off together the Saturday just prior to the killing, Mrs. Bell said Mr. Bell was paid off in the morning while McAllister was paid off Saturday afternoon.

Married in Macon

From the talk with Mrs. Bell, it developed that the couple were married in Macon – about seven years ago. Later they went to Florida, returning to Georgia about two years ago, she said.

A Good Man

In this connection Mrs. Bell said: “I can say this for Mr. McAllister, He was one of the best men I ever saw. He certainly was good to us. When my baby was ill at the hospital he used to go there nearly every day.”
When the interviewer was going, little Dolores, six-year-old daughter of the prisoner was playing with her big doll. She insisted on showing the reporter her “Mama Doll” as she called it. Later when her mother gave her a nickel she wanted the Press man to “go out and get her some ice cream” with it.

Make Arrest.

Efforts of the county police to solve the McAllister mystery culminated late yesterday in the arrest of
Mr. Bell, who lives at 111 East Broad Street, and who was a co-employee, [sic] working on an alternative shift, with with the late Edward L. Mc-

(Continued on Page Seven.)

BELL’S WIFE TRACES HIS MOVEMENT IN

(Continued from Page Sixteen)

Allister at the Atlantic Coast Line car repair department at Southover Junction.
After chcecking [sic] up all the evidence obtainable in  the case Chief Chapman, and Officers Umbach, Sheppard, and Henderson, went to Bell’s residence on East Broad between Broughton and State streets and arrested him on a warrant issued by Judge John E. Schwarz, recorder. Joseph McAllister, a brother of the dead man, swore out the warrant.

Questioned.

Bell was placed in the car with the group of officers and taken to county police headquarters. He was
taken into the private office of Chief Chapman where he was kept for about an hour and questioned before being locked up in the county jail. The prisoner, however, was said by the police to be in a semi-intoxicated condition and their efforts to get a coherent statement from him did not result in anything tangible.
When taken to the jail Bell was dressed in the clothes in which he was accustomed to work. He is a small man and rather thin. He has dark eyes and hair and appears to be about 30 years old. After he was locked up orders were given that no one be allowed to interview the prisoner.

Police Silent.

While the county police were not willing to divulge all the clues they claim to have in their possession
relatives to the murder, it is claimed that Bell owed the dead man considerable money, and that the relations between the two for several months past had not been agreeable. The county police also understood to have evidence that  Mr. Bell made a remark indicating that he and Mr. McAllister were not on good terms. On what the police believe the fatal night, ‘Bell is said to have reported to work on the night shift at the car repair shops an hour late.
Mr: McAllister, the police believe, was murdered on Monday night. He was found dead on Tuesday morning, his head having been mutilated with a hatchet.

Never Saw Hatchet.

When shown a picture of the hatchet with which McAllister is believed to have been killed, Mrs. Bell said she did nont [sic] remember ever having seen it at the McAllister residence. “We only live at Mr. McAllister’s house about a month, and I don’t think it was there. Mr. McAllister always split the wood in the yard with an ax,” she said.
Early this afternoon, Mrs. Bell called on Col. Shelby Myrick, who she said had been retained to represent her husband. she called at the county jail this morning to see her husband, but under orders from Chief Chapman she was not permitted to do so.
In the neighborhood it was at stated today that Mrs. Bell is a native of Virginia. She is said to he an efficient stenographer and, in case her husband is kept in jail, intends to get a position in order to support herself and her little girl. Several of the neighbors have assured her that they would take care of the child while she is at work, it was stated.

Sources:

Savannah Press (Savannah, GA) January 20, 1925 – Pages 16 & 7 – microfilm via University of Georgia Libraries.

City Directories [Original 2013 Post]

US Census Records are among the most important records used in genealogical research. They are a treasure trove of information; however, they come out only once every ten years leaving huge gaps.  With the 1890 census having lost so many records in a fire, often there is a twenty-year gap in our family research.  Do not overlook city directories as a potential source to fill in those gaps.
Many cities and counties have had directories published over the years.
They were created for salesmen and merchants to be able to contact
individuals.  Of course, every publisher had their own format for information they presented but it can be the source for new information. Typically, city directories give the name and address of the head of the household.  Often they give the wife’s name, usually in parenthesis, and sometimes the names of adult children living at the same address. They also usually provide a clue to the occupation of the individual.  Sometimes
there is a reverse directory included which goes by street address and provides the name of the individuals living there.
For many years, I thought a great-grandmother of mine moved from one
address to another on the same street.  A city directory revealed that they renumbered the street one year. The neighbors stayed the same but the numbers changed for all of them.  Directories will often show maps, street name changes, addresses of key businesses, churches, schools, cemeteries, post offices, hospitals, newspapers and the like.  Some will give a history of the city as well as the names of elected officials. Some, like the 1867 Atlanta City Directory, even gives the names and roles of various churches and civic organizations such as Masons and Odd Fellows.
Another major bit of information often given is if a person is a widow.  That
can be key to narrowing down the year of someone’s death and provides a “died before” date.  In some occasions, the city directory may even list marriages, and deaths, including date, during the previous year.
Smyrna Museum Collection
The Smyrna Museum has a small collection
of city directories of Marietta/Smyrna. The collection includes 1958, 1959,
1960, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1972, 1975, 1977, 1985-86, and 1987.  These directories are available for members to use at the museum for research.  If you cannot make it to the museum, the
Genealogy Committee Volunteers will be happy to do a lookup for you. Just let them know the surname and the year y  If you want more than three surnames or volumes looked at, a small donation to the Museum would be great.
Of course, if you have a Smyrna city
directory, even for a year listed above, please consider donating it to the
museum.  We would be extremely pleased to
receive it as a donation.
On-Line Resources
Google Books is always worth a quick look to see if they have a directory you are looking for. Go to books.google.com and then enter in the search box: City Directory [city of interest].  You may be surprised at what
is available online. Another great Google page is Google’s US Online Historical Directories site. It shows access points to many city, county, business, and other directories online and provides information regarding them being free or paid sites.
One of my favorite sources for Directories is Don’s List (www.donlist.net).
He has an 1859 directory of Augusta, 27 directories for Atlanta (1867-1923) as well as a Georgia Gazetteer from 1829 that provides a lot of history about
Georgia and information about the various counties and cities of Georgia at
that time. Smyrna was part of the Cherokee Nation until 1832. Once gold was
discovered, the land was quickly confiscated from the Indians and redistributed to settlers via a land lottery.
Another great source for directories is the Internet Archive (www.archive.org) and has several Atlanta directories.
Distant Cousin (www.distantcousin.com) has the 1890 Brunswick, Georgia directory and information regarding several other Brunswick, Georgia years.
Of course, Ancestry and Fold3 have many directories in the paid sections.
Off-Line Sources
Many Libraries and historical societies have city directories in their possession. It is always worth an email or telephone call to find out if a library has a city directory.  Often they will do a look-up for you without
charge or for a small fee.  Often the directories have been microfilmed so be sure to speak with a reference librarian who knows the various collections available on microfilm. Sometime those resources may be ordered via interlibrary loan.
The Family History Library has microfilm and microfiche, which can be ordered from www.familysearch.org and then viewed at your local Family History Center. They have several cities in Georgia, including Atlanta, Columbus, and Savannah.
Genealogy Research Associates will lookups in Directories for a fee. They have access to Atlanta, Augusta, Columbus, Macon, and Savannah. Check their website for years available. They currently charge $15 plus P&H for the service.

Stop Georgia State Archives Closing

I received an eMail regarding the Georgia State Archives being Closed to Public Access.  Today’s number of supporters is 16,626 and 50,000 supporters are needed.  I signed the petition and I hope you will too.

———————

The secretary of State has announced that the Georgia Archives will be closed to public access November 1st and that staff serving public access will be eliminated because Governor Nathan Deal required a 3% budget cut from this year’s budget.  Public access to the records of government is an essential element of a democratic society.  



It is critical that we muster thousands of Georgians to sign a petition requesting that the Governor reverse this decision.  Could you please ask the preservation and public history students to sign the online petition and to get at least five of their closest friends to sign the petition as well.  As of 4:30 this afternoon 3,333 had signed.  We need 50,00 from all parts of Georgia.

A news account of the closing can be found at: http://www.bizjournals.com/atlanta/news/2012/09/13/georgia-archives-closing-due-to-budget.html

Signers can go to: http://www.change.org/petitions/the-governor-of-ga-leave-our-state-archives-open-to-the-public?utm_campaign=new_signature&utm_medium=email&utm_source=signature_receipt#share