Bio – Clora Dell Scott Roberts Adams

Bio – Clora Dell Scott Roberts Adams (1883-1945)

Clora Dell Scott Roberts Adams
Photo from the Chris H. Bailey
family photo collection.
Clora Dell Scott is my great-grandmother on my newly found Roberts line. Because “O”s can look like “A”s when written various records, as you will see, sometimes records provide her name as Clora and sometimes Clara.  These name differences are confusing because she has an older sister named Clara. Luckily, Clora’s middle name of Dell is in contrast to her sister’s middle initial of “M.”

Birth

Clora was born on 6 February 1883 in Goode, Franklin County, Illinois.[1] Like many women, she doesn’t age quite as quickly as the calendar.
In 1908, on her marriage license to Hosea Adams, she indicated a birth date of 6 Feb 1884.[2]
In 1920 Census, she states her age as 35, also inferring the birth year of 1884.[3]
In 1936, on her Social Security Application, she indicated a birth date of 6 Feb 1889.[4] (In the 53 years to 1936 she only aged 47 years.)
She was the second child of Samuel Vaden Scott and Amanda Jane Haley. Her older sister, Clara, was born in 1879. We know that she had another sister, Laura born in 1888. She also had another sibling born, probably about 1885 or 1886 who died as an infant. Her sibling’s death was the first of many tragedies in her life.   

Mother’s Death

Clora was only six-years-old when her mother died in 1889. Her father married Lavina A. Shockley three years later. Samuel and Lavina had six children; Alma, Elmer, Amanda, Lillie Flossie and William giving Clora six half-siblings. Her father lived to a ripe old age of 71. 

First Marriage – Roberts

Clora and Hugh Ellis Roberts
with Carrie and Harry c. 1901.
Photo from the Chris H. Bailey
family photo collection. 
Clora married Hugh Ellis Roberts on 7 October 1900.  She was only 17 years old, and Hugh may have only been 16 years old when they married, but both indicated they were 18 on their marriage license. The families probably didn’t mind that that Clora and Hugh got married because seven months later, their first children, fraternal twins, were born.  Harry Ray Roberts and Carrie May Roberts were born on 22 May 1901 in Franklin County, Illinois.
Bert Allen Roberts, my grandfather, was born on 7 September 1903 in Spring Garden, Illinois.
Finally, Mable Ilean Roberts, Clora’s youngest child was born on 2 June 1908.

Tragedy Strikes Again and Then Again.

1908 was a terrible year for Clora.  On June 8th, her daughter Carrie died of diphtheria and measles. In 1908, both diseases were very communicable and very deadly.  It must have been horrific to try to care for a sick child and be pregnant at the same time. I’m sure the stress of trying to keep newborn Mable away from sick Carrie was difficult. Carrie was buried in Hammond Cemetery in Sesser, Franklin County, Illinois.[5] Two months later, Clora’s husband Hugh died of consumption (a term typically used to describe tuberculosis).  Hugh died on 30 August 1908 and is also buried in Hammond Cemetery in Sesser, IL.[6]

Second Marriage – Adams

Adams-Roberts Family c. 1916 - Copy from Kenneth G. Smith collection. Used by permission.
Adams-Roberts Family c.1916
Bert, Mable, & Harry Roberts
Hosea Adams (sitting)
Clora Dell Scott Roberts Adams
on right.
Photo Courtesy: Kenneth Smith
At this point in her life, she appears to have lived in Illinois all of her life.  However, something, or someone, convinced her to move to Indiana. It will take more research to figure out why she moved 150 miles away to Graysville, Indiana, where she married Hosea Lee Adams on 1 December 1908[7] only three months after the death of Bert. Hosea was born in 1889 and was six years younger than Clora. He was 19, and she was 25 at the time of the marriage. The couple lived in Sullivan County, Indiana, through 1910[8] and 1920[9] Census records.
Clora’s sons Bert Allen Roberts and Harry Ray Roberts both married in 1922 and Clora was still in Sullivan County. In 1925, Clora’s daughter Mabel Ilean Roberts married, and Clora is listed as living in Terre Haute.[10]

Later Years

With all of the kids grown and married, it appears that it was time to leave Hosea.  Sometime between 1925 and 1930, Clora and Hosea divorced and Clora moved to the Detroit, Michigan, area.  Again, I don’t know what brought her to Detroit. I have not managed to find Clora in the 1930 or the 1940 Census records. Finding her in those census records may provide insight into her life during those years.  With so many siblings it would be easy for her to hide from Hosea if she wanted to. It is also interesting to note that Clora’s name was listed as Clara in November 1942 in contrast to her name in her initial Social Security application in 1936.[11]

Death & Burial

Clora Dell (Scott) Roberts Adams died on 29 June 1945 in Detroit, Michigan at the age of 62. Her death record indicates her name as Clara.[12] Clora is buried at White Chapel Memorial Cemetery in Troy, Michigan.[13]  I am currently working to find her grave location, so I may visit her resting place in May. 

Further Actions:

·      Find Clora’s marker at the White Chapel Memorial Cemetery and visit.
·      Further analyze Clora’s siblings and determine if any of them were
o   In Sullivan County, Indiana, in 1908 that she may have gone to live with.
o   In Wayne County, Michigan, in 1930 that she may have gone to live with.

List of Greats

1.    Clora Dell Scott
2.     Samuel Vaden Scott
3.     William H. Scott

ENDNOTES

[1] Illinois Births and Christenings, 1824-1940; Clara Dell Scott, 06 Feb 1883; Birth, citing Goode, Franklin, Illinois; FHL microfilm 1,005,290; Family Search.
[2] Indiana Marriages, 1811-2007; Hosey L Adams to Clara D. Roberts – License; Family Search.
[3] 1920 Census; Hosey L Adams – Head; Ancestry.Com.
[4] U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007; Clora Dellescott Adams; Ancestry.Com.
[5] Chris H. Baley; The Samuel Vaden Scott Family – Clora Dell Scott.
[6] Ibid.
[7] Indiana Marriages, 1811-2007; Hosey Lee Adams – Clara [Clora] Dell Roberts – Marriage Registration; Family Search; https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XXFL-SMC.
[8] 1910 Census; Indiana, Sullivan, Turman, District 0178, Hosea Adams; Ancestry.Com.
[9] 1920 Census; Hosey L Adams – Head; Ancestry.Com.
[10] Indiana Marriages, 1811-2007; Olan Hart & Mable Ilean Roberts – 3 Jan 1925; Family Search.
[11] U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007; Clora Dellescott Adams; Ancestry.Com.
[12] Michigan Death Records, 1921-1947; Clara D. Adams – (aka Clora) 005362086_01019; Seeking Michigan.
[13] Find-a-Grave; Clara D. Adams –  Memorial# 141455260; http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=141455260.
———- DISCLAIMER ———-

It is all the rage – Birthplace Charts

It has become all the rage. Doing a birthplace chart.  I understand that J. Paul Hawthorne started the idea on Facebook of doing a simple pedigree chart indicating where your ancestors came from.  It has been picked up by many others, including Judy Russell, in her blog, The Legal Genealogist.  It was also suggested in Randy Seaver’s Genea-Musings  blog, so I just had to jump on the bandwagon and give it a try.
Don’s Birthplace Chart

There are several templates available, both Judy and Randy suggested one at on Google Drives.  I used it and filled in my entries with my own colors. 

My Birthplace Chart

It is clear, Michigan (light blue), with seven ancestors, is the most common state where my ancestors were born.  Next most common was Illinois (brown), with five ancestors born there.
There is a little bit of the Western Movement showing up in my chart.  New York to Indiana, Ohio to Indiana, but more so, I think, a northern movement shows up with Tennessee to Illinois to Michigan and Kentucky and Michigan to North Dakota. The unknown birth location for my maternal, great-grandfather’s parents jumps out like a sore thumb.  Trying to figure out those ancestors names and birth places is high on my list of tasks for my Brown/Montran research.
Rather than just saying England, I added the flag to show the birthplace of my 2nd great grandmother, my only known immigrant ancestor in four generations. 
My wife’s Birthplace Chart

Then I got to thinking, I really couldn’t do one of these charts without doing one for my wife’s family. We went to Easter dinner yesterday at one of niece’s homes. We enjoyed conversation with several family members. Needles-to-say, at some point anytime there is a family get together somehow the conversation turns to genealogy.  Anyway, I just happened to bring a hard copy of my wife’s birthplace chart.  It would be identical for her brother, except for the place of birth. Her brother, “J,” loved the chart and took it with him. 

I have really enjoyed the Saturday Night Genealogy Fun activity. Thanks for sharing the idea. Both my wife’s and my Birthplace charts are interesting to look at; they provide a visual representation of family lines and allows me to see things and notice things I might not otherwise notice.  Thank you J. Paul Hawthorn for the idea and thanks to Judy Russell and Randy Seaver for promoting it to be “all the rage.”

–       Don Taylor

———- DISCLAIMER ———-

Finding Family – Ancestry and AncestryDNA provided the tools to determine my biological father and half-siblings.

By Don Taylor


Determining my biological father and discovering new half siblings is, by far, the greatest success I’ve had in my genealogical activities.  Thanks to Ancestry and AncestryDNA, I have been successful in answering lifelong questions regarding my paternity and my ancestry.
Don with step father's 1964 Olds Dynamic 88, the car he learned to drive on.
Don [Matson] Taylor with step-father’s ’64 Olds Dynamic 88
(The car in which I learned how to drive – c.1965)
Note the white sidewall tires — “Budgar” had to have them.
My quest started when I was sixteen and I needed a copy of my birth certificate to get a driver’s license.  That is when I learned that the man I thought was my father not only didn’t die in a car accident when I was a baby, but he wasn’t my father either. I had used his surname (Larson) for 12 years after which I used a new step-father’s name (Matson) for four years. Now, after sixteen years,  I had a completely new identity.  My biological father’s name was completely unknown and the surname on my birth certificate was completely made up. (That’s another story.) I adopted my birth surname then and have lived with it ever since. My mother gave me some hints as to possible friends of my biological father that I might be able to contact and learn my father’s name, but following those leads were never successful. My frustration was high but I’d go back to searching and seeking over and over again.
In 1994, a here-to-unknown half-sister, Glennis Peterson, who had been put up for adoption, found her birth mother and I suddenly had a new half-sister. Glennis didn’t learn she was adopted until she was in her 20s and had been searching for her birth mother (and a known older brother – me) for nearly 20 years. (That is another story but it is her story to tell – I think it will make a great book and she is a writer.) Anyway, her finding her birth family was a major impetus for my expanding my genealogical activities. First, I wanted to support her in learning about her new family (our shared Brown/Montran line), but also her finding us meant that maybe, just maybe, I’d be able to figure out who my biological father was. For the next few years, I retraced my previous efforts making sure I hadn’t missed anything. Again, to no avail.
In 2008, Ancestry offered a Y-DNA test and I took it.  Through that test, I learned that my closest Y-DNA matches all had the same surname, “Roberts.”  The problem was all of the matches were many generations away (eight to ten generations or more); there were no close matches. Although I tried, I was unable to find any of these people having a Roberts ancestor who had descendants in the place at the right time as my conception.

In 2011, Ancestry knew they were going to eliminate their Y-DNA testing and concentrate on atDNA testing. They sent me a free “Beta” test package, so I could be included in their atDNA database. My results weren’t very exciting, most matches were known distant relatives on my mother’s side. There were a few paternal matches, but they were very distant and never had any Roberts surnamed individuals.  I was disappointed and frustrated.  I even worked on someone’s tree for a while looking for potential matches on another person’s tree that the three of us shared a segment on the same chromosome.  Still no luck. Then the wall came tumbling down.
In December 2015, I had a new match – 1st to 2nd cousin.  Wow.  And that person had a tree on Ancestry.Com.  I looked at her tree and found her grandfather’s surname was Roberts.  Could it be?  If we were second cousins we would share a great grandparent, so I used Ancestry to learn about her great grandfather’s life.  I then used that information to further understand his children. He had three sons and one of them was in the right place (Detroit, MI) at the right time (Nov. 1949).
I decided to post two stories on my blog about my findings so far.  First, I wrote about “My Paternal Brick Wall and how I believe it to be shattered. A couple weeks later I wrote about Compulsive searching – Bert Allen Roberts (1903-1949).” It was my intent to examine and explore this family line more and more until I knew if it contained my people. 
A couple weeks later, I was contacted by Melody Roberts Jackson. She was Google searching her grandmother’s name and came across my “Compulsive searching…” article. Melody read it and “My Paternal Brick Wall” post and was amazed. These were her people that I was writing about. After exchanging a few emails we chatted at length on the telephone. She said she would contact one of her cousins, someone I suspected might be a half-sister.  The potential half sister, Beverly Roberts, then called me.  And we chatted for a long time. I indicated that the only way we’d know for certain was if she took an atDNA test as also.  She agreed. AncestryDNA sent to test directly to her and she sent it in.
Hugh Eugene “Gene” Roberts
Photo Courtesy: Tom Roberts
Then the agonizing wait.  AncestryDNA says six to eight weeks, possibly longer.  We were hoping for six weeks, but it took the full eight weeks. When the results came in, we learned that we share 1593 centimorgans of DNA across 58 DNA segments.  The DNA doesn’t say we are half siblings but gives clues to possible relationships.  The only relations we share that much DNA with are grandchild, niece/nephew, aunt/uncle, or a half-sibling.   I am older than BR so I can’t possibly be her grandchild. Her oldest sibling is younger than I am, so I can’t possibly be her nephew. Her (our) grandfather died fourteen months before I was born, so I can’t possibly be her uncle. Simple logic eliminated all potential relationships except one, that of half-sibling.  Which means I finally determined who my biological father was, Hugh Eugene “Gene” Roberts. From discussions with my mother over the years, I am pretty certain he was never told of my existence.
Sadly, Hugh Eugene “Gene” Roberts died in 1997, so I’ll never have a chance to meet my biological father. However, my new found Roberts family is excited to have a new family member.  I now have five new half-siblings and a passel of new cousins. There is a whole new line to explore genealogically. But best of all, I am looking forward to meeting my new Roberts family in person later this spring and I really feel they are excited to meet me too.

ENDNOTES

———- DISCLAIMER ———-
 

Family Search Marriage Indexes — Marriage of Samuel Scott & Amanda Haley

I don’t like to admit it, but oftentimes I accept the index entries for records.  I know I should view the source document for everything possible, but the time, effort and cost of seeing every document often seems prohibitive.  When the index provides the key information I need to know, I generally accept it.  Although I know that the original documents may show much more information or even provide more accurate information, I have been lax and not ordered the actual film. Such is the case of the marriage of Samuel Scott and Amanda Haley. 

It began on Family Search. I was looking for the marriage of Samuel V. Scott and Amanda J Haley for my Roberts Family Research. I quickly found the record. Samuel V. Scott married Amanda J. Haley on 24 May 1879. He was 17 and she was 18 years old.[i]

Then I saw a second record, Samuel V. Scott married Amanda J. Haley on 24 May 1879. He was 18 and she was 19 years old.[ii] I thought to myself, ‘that’s odd, well they probably either lied about their ages or they had birthdays between when they got their license and the actual day of the marriage.’ Then I noticed that they were two different indexes from the same database.  That seemed really odd.
I decided to check out Ancestry.com and see what they showed. Also, maybe they might have an actual image.  I quickly found two results. The first one was an index only Marriage Date of 24 May 1879, but it didn’t give their ages. The second result also didn’t give their ages, but it did indicate their marriage date was 25 May 1879 and had a comment, “This record can be found at the County Court Records, Film # 1005304 – 1005310.”
Hmmm, a day here, a year there, before long I found myself with questions about what was accurate. Samuel and Amanda are second great-grandparents on my Roberts tree, so it is important to me to assure their information right. The only way to know for certain is to order the films and see exactly what these indexes were based upon. I figured that I might need to order the record from the county court, but, I decided to go back to Family Search first.   
I searched for the surnames Scott and Haley in the Franklin County Marriage Records. I found several other marriages listed in that film for individuals whose parents were William H. Scott and Emily Hendricks and a couple more who’s parents were A. J. Haley and Montgomery. They are:
Family Member
Married to:
Date:
Image Number
Mary F Haley
T. E. L. Curry
26 Feb 1878
  9
Samuel V. Scott
Amanda J. Haley
24 May 1879
26
Viola S. Scott
Charles M. K. Galloway
5 Jul 1879
27
Serena Haley
J. A. Turner
10 Sep 1885
117
S. V. Scott
Lavina Allmend Shockley
25 Dec 1892
235
Clara M. Scott
Leonard D. Mooneyham
18 Nov 1898
341
Francis P. Scott
Florence E. Roberts
24 Mar 1901
382
Laura Scott
James Vaughn
3 Jul 1904
442
William Alonzo Scott
Fannin Jane Story
14 Sep 1905
464
I thought with this many family members it is a microfilm well worth ordering. I added the image numbers, so that when I received the microfilm I’d have the image numbers so that I could quickly and efficiently find the records I am interested in.
Then, I went to the records page[iii], so that I could order the microfilm. I saw the collection included three microfilm reels and an index (the one I was using) was available online. Looking further down, I realized that there was an icon to “browse the images online.” I didn’t need to order the microfilm.[iv] The on-line index just wasn’t linked to the images, but the film has been digitized and is available online. My list of image numbers of interest was perfect. I quickly downloaded the images and all the information on many family members. Wow, so much information, so quickly. 

The Marriage of Samuel Vaden Scott (c.1862-1931) and Amanda Jane Haley (1861-1889) 24 May 1879[v]

Marriage Register – Groom Side – Samuel V. Scott 

Marriage Register – Bride Side – Amanda J Haley
Extract

Marriage License Number: 245 | Dated: May 23, 1879
Groom: Samuel V. Scott | Residence: Goode Tp, Franklin Co. | Occupation: Farmer
Age next Birthday: 18 | Race: White | Place of Birth: Tennessee
Father’s Name: William H. Scott | Mother’s Maiden Name: Hendricks | No. of Groom’s Marriage: 1
Bride: Amanda J Healey | Residence: Goode Tp, Franklin Co.
Age next Birthday: 19 | Race: White | Place of Birth: [blank]
Father’s Name: A. J. Haley | Mother’s Maiden Name: Montgomery | No. of Bride’s Marriage: 1
Where and When Married: Goode Tp. Franklin Co. May 24 1879 | Witnesses: G. Elknis & R. Elknis [??] | By whom Certified, Name and Office: S. M. Brayfield, J. P.
Date of Return: 5 24 1879 | When Registered | 6 20 1879
Items in Green above are newly learned and include the following:
The marriage license number and when it was applied for.
Where Samuel and Amanda lived at the time.
Samuel’s occupation.
Conflicting information regarding Samuel’s place of Birth (I had/have Illinois, I’ll need to sort that out later).
Who the witnesses were (although it is difficult for me to read).
Who performed the ceremony.
And, most importantly, I learned the answer to my question about Samuel and Amanda’s ages.  Samuel was 17 and Amanda was 18 when the license was taken out and at their NEXT birthdays, they would be 18 and 19. Everything fit (except Sam’s birthplace) once I saw the actual register.
This case acted a reminder, when using Family Search, always check for the film of a document. You can get a lot more information from the image without much more effort. Sometimes very important information.  They might have the film digitized and available on-line. Even if they don’t, if you can afford it[vi], order a copy, you never know what more you can learn. I know better than to take the easy way, and I plan to do better in the future.

List of Greats

1.     Clara/Clora Dell Scott
2.     Samuel Vaden Scott & Amanda Jane Haley


Follow-up:

Prove where Samuel Scott was born (Illinois or Tennessee).
Incorporate the marriage information for the other Scott and Haley family members in my tree that were married in Franklin County.

ENDNOTES

[i] “Illinois, County Marriages, 1810-1934,” database, Family Search (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KFK4-RF1 : accessed 14 March 2016), Samuel V. Scott and Amanda J. Haley, 24 May 1879; citing Franklin, Illinois, United States, county offices, Illinois; FHL microfilm 1,005,309.
[ii] “Illinois, County Marriages, 1810-1934,” database, Family Search (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KFKW-85D : accessed 14 March 2016), Samuel V. Scott and Amanda J. Haley, 24 May 1879; citing Franklin, Illinois, United States, county offices, Illinois; FHL microfilm 1,005,307.
[iii] Family Search, Marriage records, 1878-1916 – Franklin County (Illinois) County Clerk https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/270753?availability=Family%20History%20Library
[v] Ibid.
[vi] $7.50/film roll to rent and view at your local Family History Center.

———- DISCLAIMER ———-

Hugh Ellis Roberts (1884-1908), The 1900 Census, & Family Search Duplicate Merging

Family Search Duplicate Merging

I like to control and manage my family tree information. As such, I’ve never been a fan of systems where family trees are managed by many individuals. I tend to be concerned that other individuals aren’t quite as thorough as I like to think that I am. I also like to work from sources and not rely on other individual’s family trees for anything other than “hints,” so I don’t really use other people’s family trees much.

Family Search – Family Tree – Find

I was researching Hugh Ellis Roberts and couldn’t find much information. I was having such a bad time that I decided to use Family Search Family Trees to see if I could gain any leads there. After selecting [Family Tree} [Find], entering my subject’s name and year of birth the system returned 50 different entries. Four of the first five entries were my particular Hugh Ellis Roberts. They all had the same birth year, all had the same death year and they all had the same spouse. None of the entries had any sources for their information at all. Sigh…. I decided I couldn’t let four entries for the same individual stand so I selected the one that had the most information, parents and children names, and began merging the other entries into that one. It wasn’t as difficult as I thought it would be. I also corrected the marriage date from “Oct 1900” to “7 Oct 1900” and associated my source to that fact. There is still a problem with his being married to three different people, Clara, Clora, and Cora Dell Scott. I’ll merge those identities up when I work on Clara’s biography and decide on what I really think her name was. (Different records all are interpreted differently.) There are still other issues with the family unit on Family Search Family Trees, such as one of his sisters being duplicated, but I’ll fix it as I work on the family unit.

The 1900 Census

Because Hugh Ellis Roberts was born after the 1880 Census and he died in 1908 finding him in the 1900 Census was a must. I knew that his father died in 1887, so using his name wouldn’t help. I searched and searched and never found him. I also knew that he was married in 1900 in Illinois, so I figured he had to be in Illinois somewhere, probably in either Jefferson or Franklin County. Still no luck. Then I decided to search Illinois for people born in Illinois in 1884 with the surname “Roberts” and nothing else. I then looked closely at any individuals born in July. I found a “Heine” Roberts, living with his mother Anna and a sister Talaramer. His mother’s name was Patience Anna. Could it be? Looking closer at the entry,

I saw that Talaramer was a transcriber’s attempt to read a nearly illegible Florence. The birth year and place for Anna matched Patience Anna, the birth date matched the month, year, and place for Florence, and the birth month, year, and place all matched Hugh. Last, but not least, it was in Franklin County (which borders Jefferson County), Finally, I had found Hugh Ellis Roberts in the 1900 Census.

Hint: When looking for someone in a census, try ignoring the first names of individuals and just search for a surname with other identifying criteria.

RB-08 – Hugh Ellis Roberts

2 July 1884 – 30 August 1908

Hugh Ellis Roberts[i] was born in July 1884 in Illinois. His marriage license indicated that he was 18 when he was married in 1900; however, I think it is more likely that the 16-year-old Hugh lied about his age in order to marry without parental permissions. One on-line source indicates that he was born in Jefferson County, Illinois, however, the marriage license of his son, Bert Allen Roberts indicate that he was born in Benton (Franklin County, Illinois.[ii] According to other researchers, Hugh died on 30 August 1908.,[iii] Several of his children’s marriage licenses identify their father was deceased when they married in the 1920s, thus confirming the early death. Additionally, Hugh’s wife remarried in 1909.

He is the fourth known child of Asa Ellis Roberts (1835-1887), aged 49, and Patience Anna Marshall (1845-1919), aged 39. Asa and Patience had three other known children together, Charles Wilson, Rosa Della, and Florence Elizabeth Roberts. Asa was married previously to Cynthia Minerva Toney and that had six children so Hugh was the youngest of ten children of Asa. His six half-siblings were William, George, Margaret, Calvin, Sarah, and Monroe.

When Hugh was only three, his father, Asa Ellis Roberts, died (8 October 1887 – Spring Garden, Jefferson County, Illinois).

The 1900 census indicates that Hugh may have had a nickname of “Heine.” The 15-year-old was living with his mother, Anna, older sister Florence, and a niece, Nellie Roberts. It is unclear whose child Nellie was. The 1900 census indicates that only five of Anna’s six children were living, so it is possible that Nellie was the child of her dead child. Mother and son were farming in Barren Township.[iv]

On 7 October 1900, Hugh married Clara Dell Scott (1884-1945), daughter of Samuel Vaden Scott (1863-1931) and Amanda Jane Hale (?-1889) in Ina, Jefferson County, Illinois)[v]. They were both 16-years-old, however, they both indicated that they were 18 on the marriage registration.[vi]

A quick seven months later, Hugh and Clara had their first child.[vii]

The Children of Hugh and Clara included:

Harry Ray Roberts, born on 22 May 1900 in Franklin Co. (Franklin Co., Illinois). He married Lillie Vernea Higgins in 1922.
Carrie Mae Roberts, born in 1901. (I have not researched her further, yet.)
Bert Allen Roberts, born on 20 September 1903 in Sesser (Franklin, Illinois), died on 1st May 1949 in Elwood (Madison County, Indiana), aged 45. He married Essie Pansy Barnes on 13 May 1922. They had 5 children: Pansy, Bert, Hugh, Helen and John.
Mabel Ilean Roberts, born on 2 June 1908 in Lena (Stephenson County, Illinois, United States), USA. She married Olan B Hart on 3 January 1925.

It appears that the Roberts family moved from Franklin County to Stephenson County between 1903 and 1908.

Several researchers indicate that Hugh died on 30 August 1908 at the age of 24. I have been unable to confirm that; however, his wife, Clara, is reported as remarried in 1909 per the 1910 Census.[viii]

Continued Research

Confirm death date.
Determine cause of death.
Confirm day of birth.

[Note: I ordered a death certificate from Stephenson County Clerk & Recorder on 19 Feb 2016, which should answer all the above questions. If unsuccessful, will try again with Franklin County.]

Find Property Record for Anna’s farm ownership.

ENDNOTE

[i] Note: Family Search ID: LR7R-9J1
[ii] Source: Indiana Marriages, 1811-2007 – Family Search (Other)
[iii] Ibid.
[iv] Source: 1900 Census; Anna Roberts, Barren Township, Franklin, Illinois, United States; citing sheet 10A, family 182.
[v] Source: Family Search (Other) – Illinois, County Marriages, 1810-1934 / Ellis Roberts & Clara Dell Scott, 1900 – Family Search (Internet)
[vi] Source: Illinois, County Marriages, 1810-1934; Ellis Roberts & Clara Dell Scott, 1900
[vii] Note: They say the first child can come anytime, the rest take nine months.
[viii] Source: 1910 Census; Indiana, Sullivan, Turman, District 0178, Hosea Adams

———- DISCLAIMER ———-