Ancestor Sketch – Gilbert Frank Raidt – TR #12

Raidt Project
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.Gilbert Frank Raidt was born on 1 April 1894 in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota, the sixth child of Frank H and Catherine Frances (Justin) Raidt. He had five siblings: Baby Boy, Sarina Frances, Stella Catherine, Lucy Helen, and Baby Boy 2. He died on 8 July 1974 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. When he was 26, he married Beatrice Marie Gleason, daughter of John M. and Addie (Raymond) Gleason, on 13 October 1920 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, at the Holy Rosary Catholic Church. Rev. J. P. Valley performed the ceremony. 

List of Grandparents

  • Grandfather: Jerome Gilbert Raidt (1924-1994)
  • 1st Great-grandfather: Gilbert Frank Raidt (1894-1974)
  • 2nd Great-grandfather: Frank H. Raidt (1851-1931)
  • 3rd Great-grandfather: Thomas Raidt (c. 1816-____)

Gilbert Frank Raidt (1894-1974)

Birth

Gilbert Frank Raidt was born on 1 April 1894 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Although he was the sixth child of Frank H and Catherine Frances (Justin) Raidt, his two brothers died before he was born, so he grew up as the youngest of four children.

Other children of Frank H and Catherine Frances (Justin) Raidt

Name Born Married Died
(Baby boy) Before 1884 N/A Before 1886
Sarina “Rena” Frances 1884   [TBD]
Stella Catherine 1887 John Timon Leavin 1962
Lucy Helen 1889 Charles Nagle [?] 1971
(Baby boy) c. 1891 N/A Before 1893

During the 1895 Minnesota Census, Gilbert was living with his parents at 1621 11th Ave. So., Minneapolis. By 1900 the family had moved to 1949 Oliver Ave., No., Minneapolis. By 1905, the family moved again, this time to 1623 Dupont Ave. North, Minneapolis, where he would live until he married in 1920. Gilbert probably attended St. Thomas College in St. Paul at this time.

Military Service

Photo of the ship "Empress of Asia."
The Empress of Asia

Gilbert enlisted in the US Army on 19 May 1917, Shortly after the United States entered World War I (on 6 April 1917).  He remained stateside for his first year in the service. But on 19 September 1918, he shipped out aboard the “Empress of Asia[i]” heading to Europe (Liverpool) to be part of the Headquarters Troop, 86th Infantry Division. He returned and became part of the 311 Fire Truck and Hose Co. Gilbert was discharged on 24 August 1919 as a Sargent.

Marriage

Gilbert Frank Raidt married Beatrice Marie Gleason on 13 October 1920. After their honeymoon, they lived at 1724 Third Ave. So. They had six children, all born in Minneapolis.

Adulthood

Gilbert and Beatrice purchased a home at 4215 Stevens, Minneapolis, and Gilbert worked as a Building Contractor throughout his married life.

In 1942, Gilbert registered for the draft. He was described as being 5’10”, 175 lbs, blue eyes, brown hair, and a light complexion.

Death/Burial, etc.

Marker – Gilbert F. Raidt

Gilbert died on 8 July 1974 in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota. He was buried at St. Mary’s Cemetery in Minneapolis.

Further Research

  • Research Sarina “Rena” Frances and determine if she ever married and when she died.
  • Confirm Lucy Helen’s husband was Charles Nagle.
  • Research Gilbert’s military service more. Did the 86th Infantry Division see action? Was the 311 Fire and Hose company stateside or overseas?

Events by Location

  • England, Liverpool                                                   1918 – US Army Service
  • Illinois, Winnebago, Camp Grant                       1917-1918 – US Army Service
  • Minnesota, Hennepin County, Minneapolis  Birth, 1900-1940, Death
  • Minnesota, Ramsey County, St. Paul                 c. 1917 – College
  • New Jersey, Hoboken                                                1918 – US Army Service

Endnotes:

[i] The Empress of Asia was built in Govan, Scotland, and launched in 1912. According to Wikipedia, “On 9 September 1918, Empress of Asia set sail from Hoboken, NJ bound for Liverpool carrying troops from the 86th Infantry Division’s 331st Machine Gun Battalion, 311th Engineer Regiment and 311th Engineer Train. She arrived safely on 21 September 1918.

Sources

  • 1900 Census, Various, Frank H Raidt – Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota, Sheet 24A. https://www.ancestry.com/discoveryui-content/view/93073807:7602.
  • 1910 Census (NARA), Family Search, F H Raidt – Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M2G7-Z2N.
  • 1920 Census (NARA), Family Search, Frank Raidt – Hennepin, Minnesota. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MWYX-CDZ.
  • 1930 Census (NARA), Family Search, Gilbert F Raidt, Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X3ZB-WJN.
  • 1930; Census Place: Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota.
  • 1940 Census (NARA), Family Search, Gilbert Raidt – Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota/ https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KSKD-7MG.
  • Correspondence with Jerome G. Raidt – 1970s – Questionaire Answers. In the mid-1970s, I asked Mary Elizabeth Raidt’s father, Jerome G. Raidt, a series of genealogical questions. His response to those questions.
  • Find a Grave, Internet, Beatrice Marie Gleason Raidt – Memorial #157188096. Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 29 July 2018), memorial page for Beatrice Marie Gleason Raidt (4 November 1896–7 March 1962),
  • Find a Grave, Internet, Gilbert Frank Raidt – Memorial 157187764.
  • Little Falls Herald (Little Falls, MN), Newspapers.com, 1920-10-22 – Page 4 – Gilbert Raidt & Beatrice Gleason.
  • Minneapolis Star Tribune (Minneapolis, Minnesota), Internet, Beatrice Gleason – 1920-10-14 – Page 13 – Cathedral Candles and Autumn Leaves Setting for Wedding. https://www.newspapers.com/image/181524749/.
  • Minnesota Death Index, 1908-2002 (Minneapolis, Minnesota Department of Health), Family Search, Gilbert F. Raidt (No Image). https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V4CX-V8J.
  • Minnesota Official Marriage System (https://moms.mn.gov/, ), MOMS.MN.GOV, Gilbert F Raidt & Beatrice Gleason.
  • Minnesota State Census, 1895, Family Search, Frank Raidt – Hennepin County Minneapolis city, Ward 11 – Page 86, Line 2698.
  • Minnesota State Census, 1905, Family Search, Frank H Raidt – Minneapolis Ward 3, Hennepin County, Minnesota. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:SPSY-BX7.
  • Minnesota, World War I Records, 1918-1941, Family Search, Gilbert Frank Raidt. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QRVL-3NPZ.
  • Multiple, U.S., City Directories, 1822-1995, Ancestry.Com, Minneapolis, Minnesota – 1926 – Raidt. https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/2469/images/14899304.
  • Multiple, U.S., City Directories, 1822-1995, Ancestry.Com, Minneapolis, Minnesota – 1938 – Gilbert F Raidt. https://www.ancestry.com/discoveryui-content/view/1018568082:2469.
  • S., Army Transport Service Arriving and Departing Passenger Lists, 1910-1939, Ancestry.Com, Gilbert F Raidt – Departure 19 September 1918.
  • S., Department of Veterans Affairs BIRLS Death File, 1850-2010 (U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs), Ancestry.Com, Gilbert F. Raidt. https://www.ancestry.com/discoveryui-content/view/7635739:2441.
  • S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007.
  • S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942, Ancestry.Com, Gilbert Frank Raidt – 25 April 1942.
  • United States Social Security Death Index, Family Search, (No Image) – Gilbert Raidt (1894-1974).

 

Veteran’s Day 2020

By Don Taylor

Don Taylor in uniform, Barracks, Naval Station Treasure Island (San Francisco) ca. May 1969.

Today, I remember my ancestors that served in the military. I served during Vietnam and my ancestors served during every generation and many of our wars – Korea, both World Wars, the Civil War, the War of 1812, Revolutionary War, the French and Indian War, and even peacetime. I know of seven ancestors who served during the Revolution and four who served during the Civil War for the Union.

To all veterans, “thank you” for taking the oath. It is one of the most life-changing events of your life, I remember mine, and I’m sure you remember yours. I encourage everyone to use Veterans Day as a motivation to learn more about your ancestors that have worn the uniform of the United States.

New

In the past year, I’ve learned of another ancestor that served, my 2nd great-grandfather, Franklin E Barber (1836-1917). He served for the Union during the Civil War with the 6th Michigan Heavy Artillery.

Korean War

My Uncle – Russell Kees (1927-2016) fought during the Korean War.

World War II

My stepfather, Edgar Jerome Matson fought in Europe during World War II

1928-1931 – Peacetime Service

Clifford (Dick) Brown – 3rd from left, back row – Corozal (Panama) Basketball Champions – 1928.jpg

My Grandfather – Richard Earl Brown (aka Clifford Durwood Brown, aka Richard Earl Durand) (1903-1990) My maternal grandfather “Dick” served in the Army. Little is known about his peacetime military service.
In 1928, he was in the army stationed in Panama. He was a member of the base’s champion basketball team (See: Article).
In 1930, he met my Grandmother in Panama.  It appears that he was discharged in 1931.

World War I

My step-grandfather Sammy Amsterdam served during World War I.

Civil War – Grand Army of the Republic

My 2nd great-grandfather, Franklin E Barber (1836-1917), enlisted for three years into  Company I, 6th Michigan Heavy Artillery on 22 February 1864. He mustered out on 20 August 1865 at New Orleans.

My 2nd great-grandfather – John William Manning (1846-1888).
On 29 Aug 1863, John enlisted in the GAR, at the age of 17, into the 45th Regiment of Kentucky. His father, Enoch Mannin, gave his consent for young John William to enlist. Sometime between May and June of 1864 he was captured by the South (Morgan).
He mustered out on 30 Dec 1864.

My 3rd great-grandfather – Enoch Mannin (1823-1907)
On 29 Aug 1863 – Enoch enlisted (at the same time as his son John) in the 45th Regiment of Kentucky.
Between May and June of 1864, he was captured by the South (Morgan)
He was discharged on 29 Dec 1864 at Catlettsburg, KY.

My 2nd great-grandfather – Asa Ellis Roberts (1835-1887)
On 15 Aug 1861, Asa Joined the Union – Company I, 31st Regiment, Illinois Volunteers for 3 years. He was discharged early due to chronic pericarditis.

War of 1812

My 4th great-grandfather – Jacob Lawson (1800-___)
2nd Regiment (Lillard’s) East Tennessee Volunteers.
Was a private in Captain Waterhouse’s Company Tennessee Volunteers Florida.

15 Star flag War of 1812

My 3rd great-grandfather – John Calvin Roberts (1795-1873)
John C. Roberts was a veteran of the War of 1812, serving in Captain Chiles & Lieutenant Conway’s Company of Tennessee Militia. He enlisted Sep. 20, 1814 at Kingston, TN and was discharged there on May 1, 1815, serving 224 days. He received a pension for his War of 1812 military service.

Revolutionary War

My 7th great-grandfather – Grover Buel (1732-1818)
Revolutionary War (DAR – Patriot # A016639
He was a soldier of the Dutchess Co. New York Militia 6th Regiment.
He received Land Bounty Rights after the war.

My 6th great-grandfather – John Maben (1753-1813)
(DAR – Patriot # A072838) Private – 1st Claverack Batt, 9th Regt.
Private – Capt Hawley, Col Van Ness; Albany Co. Mil/New York

My 6th great-grandfather – John Parsons, Sr (1737/1738-1821)
DAR – Patriot# A088240
Lieutenant – Second LT in Capt Samuel Wolcott, 10th Co, 1st Berkshire Cnty Regt of MA Militia.
Lieutenant – Also Lt. Cap. Elijah Daming, Col Ashley.

My 6th great-grandfather – Wicks Weeks Rowley (1760-1826)
(DAR – Patriot # A09932). Private – New York Militia.

Minute Man – Lexington, Massachusetts

My 6th great-grandfather – Stephen Taft (1710-1803).
Stephen was a Lieutenant of Massachusetts Militia. He was a Minute Man at the Lexington Alarm.

My 5th great-grandfather – Silas Taft (1744-1822)
Serviced under Capt. Bezaleel Taft and Col. Nathan Taylor. He responded to the “Lexington Alarm.”

My 6th great-grandfather – Samuel Wolcott (1736-1802)
(DAR Patriot # A127434)
Captain – 10th Co, 1st Regt, Berkshire Co Militia; Col Hopkins Regt to Highlands.

French and Indian Wars

Colonial Ensign

My 8th great-grandfather – Samuel Wolcott (1679-1734)
“He commanded a military company.”
According to “The Family of HENRY WOLCOTT” by Chandler Wolcott. See: https://archive.org/details/wolcottgenealogy00wolc “He probably served in either King Williams War 1688-1697 or Queen Ann’s War (1702-1713). These wars were the first two of the four French and Indian Wars, which pitted New France against New England.

I know I have more to discover and more to learn about their service, but 18 veteran ancestors is a great beginning.

Veteran’s Day – 2019 – Remembered Ancestors

Today I remember my ancestors that served in the military. I served during Vietnam and my ancestors served during every generation and many of our wars – Korea, both World Wars, the Civil War, the War of 1812, Revolutionary War, the French and Indian War, and even peacetime. I know of seven ancestors who served during the Revolution and three who served during the Civil War for the Union.

Korean War

My Uncle – Russell Kees (1927-2016) fought in Korea.

World War II

My stepfather, Edgar Jerome Matson fought in Europe during World War II

1928-1931 – Peacetime Service

Clifford (Dick) Brown – 3rd from left, back row – Corozal (Panama) Basketball Champions – 1928.jpg

My Grandfather – Richard Earl Brown (aka Clifford Durwood Brown, aka Richard Earl Durand) (1903-1990) My maternal grandfather “Dick” served in the Army. Little is known about his peacetime military service.
In 1928, he was in the army stationed in Panama. He was a member of the base’s champion basketball team (See: Article).
In 1930, he met my Grandmother in Panama.  It appears that he was discharged in 1931.

World War I

My step-grandfather Sammy Amsterdam served during World War I.

Civil War – Grand Army of the Republic

My 2nd great-grandfather – John William Manning (1846-1888).
On 29 Aug 1863, John enlisted in the GAR, at the age of 17, into the 45th Regiment of Kentucky. His father, Enoch Mannin, gave his consent for young John William to enlist. Sometime between May and June of 1864 he was captured by the South (Morgan).
He mustered out on 30 Dec 1864.

My 3rd great-grandfather – Enoch Mannin (1823-1907)
On 29 Aug 1863 – Enoch enlisted (at the same time as his son John) in the 45th Regiment of Kentucky.
Between May and June of 1864, he was captured by the South (Morgan)
He was discharged on 29 Dec 1864 at Catlettsburg, KY.

My 2nd great-grandfather – Asa Ellis Roberts (1835-1887)
On 15 Aug 1861, Asa Joined the Union – Company I, 31st Regiment, Illinois Volunteers for 3 years. He was discharged early due to chronic pericarditis.

War of 1812

My 4th great-grandfather – Jacob Lawson (1800-___)
2nd Regiment (Lillard’s) East Tennessee Volunteers.
Was a private in Captain Waterhouse’s Company Tennessee Volunteers Florida.

15 Star flag War of 1812

My 3rd great-grandfather – John Calvin Roberts (1795-1873)
John C. Roberts was a veteran of the War of 1812, serving in Captain Chiles & Lieutenant Conway’s Company of Tennessee Militia. He enlisted Sep. 20, 1814 at Kingston, TN and was discharged there on May 1, 1815, serving 224 days. He received a pension for his War of 1812 military service.

Revolutionary War

My 5th great-grandfather – Silas Taft (1744-1822)
Serviced under Capt. Bezaleel Taft and Col. Nathan Taylor.

My 6th great-grandfather – John Maben (1753-1813)
(DAR – Patriot # A072838) Private – 1st Claverack Batt, 9th Regt.
Private – Capt Hawley, Col Van Ness; Albany Co. Mil/New York

My 6th great-grandfather – John Parsons, Sr (1737/1738-1821)
DAR – Patriot# A088240
Lieutenant – Second LT in Capt Samuel Wolcott, 10th Co, 1st Berkshire Cnty Regt of MA Militia.
Lieutenant – Also Lt. Cap. Elijah Daming, Col Ashley.

My 6th great-grandfather – Wicks Weeks Rowley (1760-1826)
(DAR – Patriot # A09932)
Private – New York Militia

Minute Man – Lexington, Massachusetts

My 6th great-grandfather – Stephen Taft (1710-1803)
Stephen was a Lieutenant of Massachusetts Militia. He was a Minute Man at the Lexington Alarm.

My 6th great-grandfather – Samuel Wolcott (1736-1802)
(DAR Patriot # A127434)
Captain – 10th Co, 1st Regt, Berkshire Co Militia; Col Hopkins Regt to Highlands.

My 7th great-grandfather – Grover Buel (1732-1818)
Revolutionary War (DAR – Patriot # A016639
He was a soldier of the Dutchess Co. New York Militia 6th Regiment.
He received Land Bounty Rights

French and Indian Wars

Colonial Ensign

My 8th great-grandfather – Samuel Wolcott (1679-1734)
“He commanded a military company.”
According to “The Family of HENRY WOLCOTT” by Chandler Wolcott. See: https://archive.org/details/wolcottgenealogy00wolc “He probably served in either King Williams War 1688-1697 or Queen Ann’s War (1702-1713). These wars were the first two of the four French and Indian Wars, which pitted New France against New England.

I know I have more to discover and more to learn about their service, but 18 known ancestor Veterans is a great beginning.

Beauties at City Hall, Boston, 1916, Included Donna Montran

Initially published on 2 March 2016

UPDATE – 19 June 2018

I found an article in the Boston Globe (via Newspapers.com) about the contest. That article was on the front page of the 11 December 1916 issue of the Boston Globe, Page 1. The quality of the image is a little clearer than the image from the Boston Post (via Newspaper Archives). I updated the post with both images side by side.


Got to love the vocabulary used in old newspapers. “Pulchritude” is the kind of word that if you Google it, you can see how many on-line dictionaries there are. It is a big word for a common thing.  Check it out for yourself.

Boston Post, 12 Dec 1916
Via Newspaper Archive

Boston Globe, 12 Dec 1916
Via Newspapers.Com

In a previous article, I mentioned that Donna tried out to become the “Miss Boston” representative at the big preparedness bazaar to be held at the Grand Central Palace in New York. Well, I found another article about the contest Donna was involved in. According to the “Boston Post” of December 12, 1916, more than 50 girls had already tried out for Miss Boston and a “big rush” of over 100 more girls was expected. The Post’s article included photos of ten of the girls vying for Miss Boston. You never guess who the first girl shown in the article was?  One of two girls on page one was grandma, Donna Montran.  This newspaper photo is one of the earliest photos we have of Donna as a closeup. The article goes on to say that Donna is a blonde even though the photo doesn’t look that way.

The paper printed the names and addresses of the applicants.  Imagine what would happen today if a newspaper published the home addresses of 49 pulchritude contestants. In December 1916, Donna was living at 64 Bennett in Brighton (Boston), MA.

By the way, “preparedness bazaar” referred to actions to prepare the United States for entry into World War I. The United States didn’t enter the war until four months later, on 6 April 1917. However, in December 1916, businessmen, intent on making money on the war, promoted military preparedness and the beauty contests were part of their strategy to create hype to encourage the US to enter the war.

———- DISCLAIMER ———-

“Chin Chin” at Liberty Theater, Camp Sherman, Ohio

Donna Montran and “Chin Chin” played at the Liberty Theatre, Camp Sherman, (Chillicothe), Ohio on 4 April 1920

Vaudeville/Chin-Chin
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.“Chin Chin” played at the Grand Opera House in Canton, Ohio on April 1st. It is not clear if they played anywhere on April 2nd or 3rd, but the cast and crew arrived to perform at the Liberty Theatre at Camp Sherman, (Chillicothe) Ohio on April 4th, 1920.

Show Advertising

Even though the show was on a military base, advertising was like most cities that the show went to. I have been unable to find base papers, handbills, or programs, so all I have seen came from the Chillicothe Gazette, the nearby town’s newspaper. There was a typical “Chin-Chin” advertisement showing Walter Wills and Roy Binder about five days before the show. Long thin column ads ran on April 1st and 2nd mentioning that the show sold out in many locations before and those that want to see the show should get their tickets right away.

On the day before the show, another “Chin-Chin” ad ran in the Chillicothe Gazette showing the “Pekin Girls.”

There were no reviews nor was there any after show information regarding the show.

Liberty Theater, Camp Sherman

Liberty Theater, Camp Sherman

In the spring of 1917, the loss of seven ships and related heavy loss of American lives spurred president Woodrow Wilson to request of Congress a declaration of war against Germany. The declaration was approved on 6 April 1917, and America entered the war.[i]

A massive construction program created by the War Department resulted in the simultaneous nation-wide construction of 16 new National Army cantonments and 16 new Army National Guard training camps.

Approximately 5,000 workers had arrived by 5 July 1917, and construction started the next day.[ii] During the war construction never ended. There were 13 contracts for building during the war and there was constant expansion until Armistice Day. Besides barracks, the Camp included 11 YMCA buildings and three theaters.  Two for motion pictures and one building, the Liberty Theatre, that could do both motion pictures and live shows.

The theater was completed by December 1917. Most sources I have found indicate it had a seating capacity of 1,300 people,[iii] however, the Julius Cahn – Gus Hill 1922 Supplement indicates the seating capacity was 2,500. All agree that it was managed by a civilian.

Most of the Camp’s buildings were demolished during the 1920s.

Camp Sherman

Image of Woodrow Wilson created by 21,000 officers and men. Camp Sherman 1918. Photo: Public Domain via Library of Congress.

Camp Sherman is particularly well known for a formation they did consisting of 21,000 troops that formed an image of Woodrow Wilson. It is one of those truly amazing Great War photos.

The next day, the “Chin Chin” cast and crew played 150 miles north of Chillicothe at the  Sandusky Theater in Sandusky, Ohio.

 


Endnotes

[i] Camp Sherman, Ohio: History of a World War I Training Camp by Susan I. Enscore, Adam D. Smith, and Megan W. Tooker – Published by US Army Corps of Engineers – ERDC/CERL TR-15-25 – December 2015. Page 24

[iii] History of the Ohio State University – Volume IV, The University in the Great War, Part III, In the Camps and at the Front by Wilbur H. Siebert.