Clifford Brown (aka Richard Earl Durand, aka Richard Earl Brown) (1903-1990)

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 38
Clifford Brown (1903-1990)
(aka Richard Earl Durand)
(aka Richard Earl Brown)

By – Don Taylor

No Story Too Small

We all have someone in our tree that is confusing. It is that person that the more you learn about them; the more you know you do not know. My grandfather was such a person. It wasn’t until I began doing genealogy that I learned his birth name. I also knew he went by another name but didn’t have a clue why. Back in the late 1990s, I asked his sister, Delores, about the name changes and again I asked her about it in the 2000s, and she avoided answering. She said she didn’t want to speak ill of the dead and that “Dick” was her “favorite brother.” I so wish I hadn’t let her take that stand. In the following years, thanks to Genealogy Bank, I learned much about my grandpa Dick, things that I would have never imagined. Through that research, I think I know why the changes in
name. Continue reading “Clifford Brown (aka Richard Earl Durand, aka Richard Earl Brown) (1903-1990)”

Bio – Cecelia Squires Severson Brown (1901-2003)

Happy Birthday Cecelia

Today is the 112th anniversary of the birth of Cecelia Squires Severson Brown, my step-grandmother. 
Cecelia Squires Severson Brown
abt 1975
Cecelia was born on 19 November 1901 in Faribault, Minnesota to Guy Bedford Squires and Dollah Wakeman Squires. She was the oldest of seven children having five brothers and one sister. 
When Cecelia was about seven, the family moved to Kidder County, North Dakota, which is where she grew up. The Severson’s lived in Crystal Springs while the Browns also lived in Kidder county, however the Browns lived in Robinson and Merkle which are about forty miles away.  It is unknown if they knew each other at that time. 
About 1922, Cecelia married Henry Severson and they relocated to Staples, Todd County, Minnesota, where their first child, a boy, was born. Over the next 12 years they would have four more children, two boys and two girls for a total of five children.
I assume that Cecelia’s first husband, Henry J. Severson died, he was seventeen years Cecelia’s senior. In any event, on March 8th, 1975, she married Richard Earl Brown (Grandpa Dick)  They lived in her house in Motley until his death in January, 1990. Cecelia lived nearly fourteen more years dying on 21 December 2003, at the age of 102.  She is buried in the Motley Cemetery, in Todd county, just outside of Motley (Morrison county) Minnesota. 

My recollection of Cecelia was that she was very religious and very much a church goer and supporter. 

Sources
Ancestry.Com 

Social Security Death Index
1910 Census
1920 Census
1930 Census
1940 Census
U.S. Public Records Index, Volume 1

Find a Grave – Memorial #55427715


Don’t Forget Books – Sanford & Parsons in Wells county, North Dakota

Don’t Forget Books

When researching ancestors, particularly ones that settled a particular location early in that location’s history don’t forget to look for key books regarding the location.  
I’ve tried using Google Books first and OCLC’s WorldCat second, but, have found that WorldCat provides fewer false positives in the searches.  
First, I do a search on OCLC’s World Cat. As an example, I searched for: {“Wells County” “North Dakota”}  which yielded 257 potential candidate books. In this particular search the first two entries, Atlas of Wells County, and Soil Survey: Wells County weren’t of interest to me at this time.  The third entry certainly piqued my interest, The history of Wells County, North Dakota, and its pioneers : with a sketch of North Dakota history and the oregin [sic] of the place names.
I then highlight the title, copy the name and switch windows to books.google.com.  Generally, the book is listed on the first page of the google books search. I look at the book there, in particular look to see if an ebook is available.  I’m looking for the beautiful “  EBOOK – FREE  ” block.  If it is there, fantastic. In the search box below the book’s title I enter my desired search criteria, (typically a surname) and look to see if the book has anything I am looking for.  
If it is not there, I prefer to see the book myself and not rely upon others to do a lookup for me; so, at this I switch back to WorldCat and get the information I need to order the book/material via interlibrary loan.
Generally, in a couple weeks the book is at my local library where I can closely review the material for information pertinent to my research.  
In the case of The History of Wells County, North Dakota, and it pioneers… I received the book in a few weeks and reviewed it closely.  there was a nice seven paragraph biography of A. C. Sanford (Almond Sanford). The biography mentions his mother and father (my 3rd great-grandparents), a brother, and sister settled the area with him, at the same time.  Almond’s sister married William Wright. William Wright is covered in another biography in the book.  I also learned that A.C. had three cousins, Webster, Winfield, and Chas. E., who also settled the area at the same time. Elsewhere in the book, I learned that his uncle, Charles A. Sanford, was a major donor to the University at Jamestown, ND. So much so that a hall was named for him. (Sanford Hall). 
I was able to glean 11 source citations and a few dozen facts regarding the Sanfords and the Parsons that settled Wells County, North Dakota in the early 1880s from the book including this regarding my 3rd Great grandfather William Sanford: 

“Wm. Sanford and his sons, A. C. and George P. Sanford, located on Section 6 in northwestern Sykeston township in 1883.  Wm. Sanford was the father of Mrs. Wm. Wright of Cathay, and a brother of C. A. Sanford of Courtney, donor of Sanford Dormitory at Jamestown College.”
I am certain I will find more information in the three books I still have on request regarding Wells County, N.D., via interlibrary loan.  Hopefully, I will learn exactly how Webster, Winfield, and Charles E are related.

Biography: Clyde Leroy Brown

Today is the 119th anniversary of the birth of my Grand-Uncle, Clyde Leroy Brown. Born 12 Feb 1894, in Minnesota, he was the oldest of 13 children of Arthur Durwood and Mary Elizabeth Manning Brown. He grew up in Crow Wing County, Minnesota.
About 1902 he moved with his parents to Kidder County, North Dakota. 
Image of the 41st Infantry Division Insignia. Yellow on red backbround.
41st Infantry Division Insignia 

In May of 1917, Clyde enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard. His regiment, the North Dakota 1st (aka 164th Infantry Regiment of the 41st Infantry Division). On 1 May 1918, his regiment headed to Europe as part of The American Expeditionary Forces. In France, the 41st Division received disappointing news that they were designated a “replacement division” would not go into combat as a unit. In October 1918, Clyde was assigned to the 116th Supply Train, which was the first of three support assignments. The War ended on 11/11/1918. He remained in Europe for another nine months being assigned to the Provisional Motor Transport Company Unit, then finally, Motor Transport Company No. 831. Before leaving France, he married Yvonne Caumont. 

SS Imperator / USS Imperator
He and Yvonne arrived in New York aboard the USS Imperator on 10 Aug 1919. The Imperator was the largest ship of its day, being larger than the Titanic when it was built.  Clyde was discharged on 11 Aug 1919 at Hoboken, New Jersey. 
Clyde and Yvonne settled in Baxter, Crow Wing County, Minnesota. In the next ten years, they have moved to Rosing, Morrison County, Minnesota, USA and had seven children,

Marie
Clarence
Marcelle
William
Bernice
Artie 
Baby (name not known)

Clyde & Alice Brown
Yvonne died in January 1932. 
The intervening years are a mystery.  I haven’t been successful finding him in the 1940 census nor any other records until 5 Dec 1942, when he married Susan Harman in Crow Wing County, Minnesota.
He married Alice Marie Tyson about 1957.
He may have lived for a period in California, but by 1961 he returned to Minnesota and he lived on Route 4, Brainerd.
He retired from the Northern Pacific Railway Company.
Clyde died on 4 Aug 1971 in Crow Wing County and was buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Block 10,  Lot 87, Section: SEC.
For my sources please see Ancestry Sources File
If you have photos or additional information regarding Clyde Leroy Brown, please leave comments or email me directly.
Actions for the future:

Confirm the baby, name, and story.
Find Clyde and his children in the 1940 Census.
Investigate Susan Harman
Investigate Alice Tyson
See if he shows in any Northern Pacific Railway documents.