Y-DNA Projects – 16 December 2014

Where I am at with my Y-DNA Projects, 16 December 2014

My Wife’s Y-DNA – Ancestry
My wife’s brother tested his Y-DNA with Ancestry.Com. Because they have quit supporting Y-DNA and because I haven’t done a transfer of the Ancestry results to Family Tree DNA, there are no new results. I’ve thought about transferring his results to Family Tree DNA however, it costs $58.00 and I’m feeling broke this month. Maybe next year. Also, I’m disillusioned by my Y-DNA results (see below), so maybe not next year either. We’ll see.

Family Tree DNA 

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My Surname

Begins with
Equals
Contains
Ends with
Sounds like

My closest hit to my DNA (89% likelihood a common ancestor in 8 generations) still hasn’t answered. So, I emailed him again last month. Still no answer. No new matches either. Sigh….

My Friend T-Roy
I’ve been helping a friend, T-Roy, with his genealogy. In particular, his paternal side is lost. We know precious little regarding his grandfather and nothing before that. Because of the many disappointments I have had with Y-DNA testing, I am reluctant to recommend that path any longer. Maybe an atDNA test will provide results. There is such a large base if atDNA test subjects.

Conclusion
I’ve decided to break my blogs regarding DNA testing into two groups threads. This one regarding Y-DNA and another thread regarding atDNA. That way I can track and report statuses on each of the project areas better.

————Disclaimer ————-

What I’m working on

I thought I’d revisit the status of my genealogical research and compare the four family trees I am pursuing — Darling, Howell, Brown, & (Roberts?) I figured defining the trees and the blanks clearly and consistently would help me determine where I should put my efforts.
I started with generation 2 on all the trees, so the home person for each of the trees is well into their 80’s or have passed over.

Gen – Darling – Howell – Brown – (Roberts)
1-3      7        7        7         0       
 4       4        7        6         0
 5       7        3        4         0
 6       4        1        6         0
 7       1        2        6         0
 8       2        0        5         0
 9       2        0        6         0
10       4        0        4         0
—    —–    —–    —–    —–
Tot %  3.03%    1.95%    4.30%       0%

From this chart is is pretty clear that the “Roberts Notional” tree should be my Number 1 priority.
Certainly, there is a massive brick wall but I haven’t exhausted all of my possible research areas.  I am sure that this will be my first genealogical research trip.  I still need to put in a clear list of tasks.  Luckily the trip would only be an overnight type of trip (about 6 hours each way), but I think it will be important to make the trip.  I’ve exhausted almost everything I can do on line.

The second most important tree is the Darling Line. Neither the Huber nor the Trumpii families are traceable back to Switzerland.  I still have a lot of on-line research I can do.  I’ve gotten caught up in following the Darling/Swayze line because there is lots of information available.  I’ll admit, I followed the path of least resistance.  Also I focused on that line because of presentation I was putting together for “The Aunties” who were interested in the Darlings most of all.  My wife also has a 2nd cousin who I’m in contact with that I found a marriage licence that indicates some ancestors that are completely different from the ancestors she thought she had.  She’s asked that I help her with sorting that out.  

The Brown line stops in generation 3 with John Montran. We have no idea who his parents were, of even if John Montran was really his name. This one looks like a brick wall, but is probably a metal  reinforced concrete wall with just a brick facade.

Lastly, on the Howell line, James Ashley Hobbs’s mothers name is lost. We know it begins with an “M” but that is about all.  I think this one will probably be the easiest to determine. When I work on the Howell line, that will be my focus.  Although, following the Howells back earlier would be very fruitful.  We have several people related via DNA that we could connect with if we can go back one or two more generations.  We have the right names in the right counties only about 20 years apart so we are close to finding that relationship.

There are a few other trees I’m looking at and helping with as well. One is for my best friend, one for a former step-daughter (who I raised from 6-16), and one for a former customer that has a particularly interesting (famous) ancestor.

So my brick walls that I’m working on are:
Roberts – TN, NC, SC, VA
Huber – MI, Switzerland
Trumphi(i) – MI, Switzerland
Montran – MI
Hobbs, NC, VA

When I want some successes, I work on:
Darling, MI, (NY before 1840)
Howell, NC (VA before 1820 & Civil War)
Manning, MN, KY (Civil War too)
Smith/Middleton

Y-DNA – Post2: The Test, Results, & Roberts Connection

I
was really excited to get the test. I did the cheek swabs and sent it back the
following day.  Then the long wait – It
seemed like months, but was probably only a few weeks.  I don’t recall when I sent the swab in, but
in November, 2008, I receive the results. 
They determined I am haplogroup R1b – who Ancestry calls “The
Artisans”.  Basically, they are the folks
from what is now the British Isles, France, and the Iberian Peninsula.  No surprise there, I always figured I was of
Northern European decent as I my skin is quite light, I was blond as a kid, and
had a lot of red in my beard as a young man. (It is grey now.)
Then
the click to see matches.  My closest
match was a person with whom I shared a common ancestor 10 generations ago. His
last name was “Roberts.”  Assuming there
weren’t any sideways name changes (like mine), it might be that I was fathered
by someone with the surname of Roberts. 
Now, I could tie my ancestry to a possible name.  Of course, in my excitement of finding a
possible connection I didn’t realize that over 10 generations there were likely
thousands of male offspring.  Although he
had 11 generations of male ancestors in his tree, if I started at that tenth
generation ancestor and each generation had two boys, then there would be over
2000 potential father candidates, assuming I could follow each of the
lines.  It became dejecting but I hoped
to persevere in the long rum.  I
connected with Mr. Roberts and exchange trees with him to this day.  Ancestry has updated their database and he
now shows as sharing a common ancestor with me 14 generations ago.
Another
two men with the surname Roberts have shown up as sharing a common ancestor
within 10 generations.  I haven’t
contacted them yet but probably will do so in the near future.    
Then
the most amazing thing occurred.  A
person popped into the DNA matches with whom our MRCA (most recent common
ancestor) is only 3 generations away. 
Wow!  He too is a Roberts.  Finally someone who’s tree I can work with to
determine a possible father.  I contacted
him and he agreed to share trees with me. Of course, Ancestry’s MRCA
determination isn’t quite a clean as you might think.  It is really complicated, but basically there
is a 50% chance that this person and I share a common ancestor within 3
generations.  I looked at his tree
closely, nothing jumped out at me, no one lived in the right city at the right
time.  More importantly, none of his
three ancestor generations could be candidates nor any of their offspring.  So, based upon his known tree, I’ve begun a
Roberts Notional tree wherein I’m going back to his fourth, fifth, and sixth
ancestral generations then following each of the male offspring looking for
someone who might be the right Roberts at the right place and time.  I’m afraid I might need to wait another 10
years until the 1950 census comes out to find out the answer.  Certainly, the family tree can wait a few
more years.
Next – My Brother-in-law’s DNA Test & Results

Genealogical Success Rating – 4%

Crista Cowan suggested on the Ancestry.com Aces Program group on Facebook that we do a simple math exercise about quantifying our successes in genealogy. I thought I had been doing pretty good, all things considered, but see I was only deluding myself.

I know that I’ve done a lot better on my wife’s tree and that not knowing my father cuts my possibility to 50% on all generations except 1-4 which is 53%.  (Figuring out who my natural father was is another project I’m working on).  When I can determine who that is, thanks to DNA Testing, it will open up the other side dramatically, probably double all numbers.

Anyway, here are my numbers.

Generations 1-4: 8 out of 15 (53.3%)
5th Generation: 6 out of 16 (37.5%)
6th Generation: 4 out of 32 (12.5%)
7th Generation: 6 out of 64 (9.3%)
8th Generation: 6 out of 128 (4.7%)
9th Generation: 5 out of 256 (2.0%)
10th Generation: 6 out of 512 (1.2%)

Total: 41 out of 1,023 (4.0%)

By the way, if I use my stepfather Generations 1-4 jump to 100% and the 5th generation jumps to 10 of 16 (62.5).

Wow, I have a lot of work to do on my tree, so you can expect to see I’ll be working on Brown/Montran and the “Roberts Notional” trees in the near future.  The Roberts Notional tree I’m working on is based upon DNA results which I’ll write more about later.